Plant Catalog for Mail Order: Spring 2022

Callistemon viridiflorus

Callistemon viridiflorusmountain bottlebrush
Small and compact evergreen bottlebrush, to 5 ft tall x 6 ft wide, this from cuttings of a specimen in Oregon's Willamette Valley. Arching branches carry small, glossy leaves and, in mid summer, soft, greenish yellow, "bottlebrush" flowers. Best in a hot, sunny position, well-drained with occasional summer water. Easily frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8, and very likely into zone 7 in optimum conditions.
Myrtaceae $16 3D

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Calycanthus occidentalis - Josephine Co. Oregon western spice bush
This represents the northern-most distribution of a lovely Oregon native deciduous shrub with the only other species residing in Florida and Asia. Growing along seasonally dry creeks, these plants can reach 6-8' height with equal spread. Deep red flowers in spring then, with this strain, throughout summer smelling of a rich red wine, sadly more like Elmer's glue with the afternoon heat... can't win them all! Attractive seed pods and lemon yellow fall color. Sun or shade, any drainage, dry in summer USDA zone 7
$15

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Camassia leichtlinii great camas
One of the most beautiful native bulbs of the Willamette and Umpqua valleys, very deep blue flowered. Plant in winter wet areas that dry out for the summer. Think a bakey summer spot without sprinklers or garden hoses...Parking strip? Grows to 2 feet or so in height and flowers in April and May. Frost hardy to well below 0F, into USDA zone 6. Very easy, colony-forming native wildflower for the garden border.
Liliaceae $12 3D

Camellia 'Night Rider'

Camellia 'Night Rider'
The "black" camellia has dark red, semi-double flowers that are darker on the undersides -- very dark and gorgeous in late winter, early spring. New foliage also has red overtones. An evergreen shrub, upright and somewhat compact to only 4-5 ft tall and wide, this is a must have plant for any garden in part shade with protection from the afternoon sun and rich soil with regular summer moisture. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7. (For those who love nomenclature, the parentage is a follows: a hybrid of C. x williamsii 'Ruby Bells' (= C. saluenensis x C. japonica 'Fuyajo') and C. japonica 'Kuro Tsubaki'.)
Theaceae $22 2D

Camellia japonica 'Unryu'

Camellia japonica 'Unryu'contorted japanese camellia
Stems twist and turn on this medium-sized Camellia, to 6 ft tall creating an interesting shape in the garden. "Unryu" means "dragon in the clouds" suggesting the twisting of a dragon as it climbs to the sky. Spring flowers are red-pink and single. Evergreen foliage is glossy in part to full shade with summer water. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 6.
Theaceae $18 4D

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Camellia sasanqua 'Lil Rose'

Theaceae $16 4D

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Cardamine trifolia trifoliate bittercress
One of our favorite small-scale groundcovers, first given to us by Jane Platt. To only about 4" in height by 18" wide, the evergreen, fine textured leaves support (winter through spring) delicate white flowers. Slowly spreading, in the light woodland or in container. Excellent for holding soil. Does not re-seed, we promise. Cold hardy to USDA Zone 6, if not colder.
Brassicaceae $14 4in

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Carex gregii

Cyperaceae $12 2D

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Carex lambertiana
Shiny bright green leaves and a vigorous clumping habit make this evergreen sedge a great addition to pair with other moisture loving plants. 2 x 2' an a little larger, sun to shade in moist soil, tolerant of even periodic standing water, so perfect near a pond edge or water feature. Lovely mixed with bold textures like Phormium or large-leaved Mahonia. Cold hardy 5 to 10F. USDA zone 7b
Cyperaceae $12 3D

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Carex pansa dune sedge
Often seen under the name "dune sedge" this native of the immediate west coast of North America spreads via short rhizomes eventually creating a carpet of lustrous green leaves. It'll withstand long periods of summer drought. excellent for container, tussock forming ground cover, or an exceedingly rough-and-tumble, low-water lawn substitute. USDA zone 7, even 6, but may not remain as winter green. Sun or Shade.
Poaceae $12 2D

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Carex secta makura grass
A large distinctive evergreen grass as it builds a trunk of dead roots which can raise the living tussock to 3 ft above ground giving the whole plant a height of 5 feet. Leaves are bright green with attractive bronze tones and 24" long, deeply grooved and strongly keeled. Will grow in wet ground as in its native habitat in New Zealand. Blooms mid spring thru midsummer. Sun to part shade, with regular summer water. Cold hardy to USDA zone 7.
Cyperaceae $14 2D

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Cassinia fulvida

Asteraceae $16 4in

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Casuarina glauca gray she-oak
A most attractive Australian "she-oak,” this from seed collected at some elevation. A medium tree, to 30 ft or more, with wispy, blue foliage, the "leaves" expressed as tiny scales on small, multi-branched stems and providing wispy blue foliage. Full sun is best for blueness. Very drought tolerant but accepts summer water as well. Evergreen in USDA zone 8 and up; surprisingly perennial in zone 7. Impressive. Very good container subject. Somewhat invasive in Florida and Hawaii.
Casuarinaceae $14 3D

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Ceanothus gloriosus 'Mendo Matic'

Rhamnaceae $16 4in

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Ceanothus gloriosus 'Sunshine' sunshine wild lilac
A Cistus introduction our own collection of this slightly larger than the standard form of the species with inch long holly-like leaves, an arching habit to 3 to 4 feet tall and spreading to about 5 to 6' with tons of violet-blue flowers in March and April for us. More tolerant of at least some summer water than other ceanothus; still enjoys bright light, sharp drainage and not too much love. USDA zone 7.
Rhamnaceae $14 2D

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Ceanothus thyrsiflorus 'Oregon Missed'
A chance seedling in the Cistus Nursery garden. Arising from a cross between a Paul Bonine/Greg Sheperd introduction, 'Oregon Mist', and the old selection 'Victoria', possessing full rounded leaves and rather dense growth of Victoria, but the quick upright form of 'Oregon Mist'. The seedling was noticed at the base of our original Oregon Mist specimen after it's untimely death at the age of over 10 years, at nearly 20' in height. Excellent screening plant, with dry position, where horizontal space is precious. Pleasing light blue flowers, early to midspring, sometimes repeated. USDA zone 7.
Rhamnaceae $15 2D

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Cephalotaxus harringtonia 'Mary Fleming' japanese plum yew

Cephalotaxaceae $18 2D

Cercis occidentalis

Cercis occidentalis western redbud
Lovely small tree or large shrub from the Southwest, to 10-15 ft tall x 12 ft wide, with rounded leathery leaves, green above and paler green below. Deciduous, they produce wonderful autumn colors in yellows and reds. Pea-like red-pink flowers appear along the limbs in spring before the leaves appear. Full sun to part shade with little summer water once established. Cold hardy in USDA zone 5-9.
Fabaceae $16 3D

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Cercocarpus intricatus desert mahogany
Dense form of the desert mahogany from the mountains of the southwest -- northwest Mexico into the Great Basin. Dense shrubs, eventually to 10 ft or so of tufted, deep-green, rice-grain sized leaves angled to show the pale undersides. Small spring flowers give way to clematis-like seed heads. Most attractive when backlit. Sun and well-drained soil. Good drought tolerance. USDA zone 5. Can be pruned into the most delicate, small evergreen tree for desert climates.
Rosaceae $16 2D

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Chiastophyllum oppositifolia
Unusual sedum relative, a hardy succulent for the shady, woodland garden! Evergreen, with thick emerald green, scalloped leaves on mounding/trailing plants 4 inches tall. In May and June chains of light yellow flowers dangle from 8 inch upright stems. Likes rich, well-drained soil with occasional summer moisture. Morning sun to dappled shade. Good in containers as well. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6.
$15 3D

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Chionochloa flavicans broad-leaved snow tussock
Lovely and graceful New Zealand grass, arching with summer flowers in pale tassels that stand out against the finely textured, bright evergreen leaves. Forms clumps to 30" tall x 40" wide in sun and well-drained soil. Best with regular water in sun to part shade where soil is well-drained. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Poaceae $12 4in

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Chionochloa rubra red tussock grass
Lovely, dense tussock grass from New Zealand, to 3-5 ft tall, with long, lax leaves and an over all reddish cast making a fine textured presence. Best in sun with adequate summer water, but tolerates both wet and dry conditions. Remains evergreen in winter. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Poaceae $14 2D

Chlorophytum 'Gold Nugget'

Chlorophytum 'Gold Nugget'gold nugget spider plant
From the Drakensburgs of eastern South Africa and shared with us by plantsman Gary Hammer, this is essentially a dwarf, variegated, ground-covery spider plant -- with no macramé hangers needed. (Does anyone remember macramé?) Has been a wonderful addition to container plantings for us with its 6", light cream and green striped leaves and has been hardy in the ground, frosting back only when temperatures drop to 20F, USDA zone 9, though we would recommend a mulch with such temperatures. Even summer moisture; bright light to fairly deep shade. Decent drainage best.
Asparagaceae $9 3D

Chrysanthemum x rubellum 'Clara Curtis'

Chrysanthemum x rubellum 'Clara Curtis'
Terrific perennial for ground cover, garden accent, or pot specimen in full sun to light shade with regular summer water. Foliage is a very respectable blue-green that is completely covered in late summer/early autumn by profuse daisy-like flowers, wonderfully warm pink with yellow centers -- a pink everyone can love. Forms clumps 2-3 ft tall by 2 ft wide, spreading underground. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.
Asteraceae $11 4in

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Chusquea gigantea giant chilean clumping bamboo
A connoisseurs’ dream plant. Erect solid canes blushed claret red, purple, green and white maturing to chartreuse yellow. Branches in whorls with pendulous dominant branch offering a weeping willow canopy. Forms open groves requiring space for this Brobdingnagian clumper. Reaches 30 ft in time (typically 15-20 ft); full sun to partial shade; cold hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Poaceae $16 3D

Cistus 'Little Gem'

Cistus 'Little Gem'rockrose
A small rockrose, one of Eric Sammons hybrids, with narrow green foliage on reddish stems and, best of all, spring flowers of pure white. Very striking. To 3 ft tall x 4 ft wide. Happy in sun and well-drained soil. Drought tolerant once established but accepts occasional summer water. Cold hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Cistaceae $14

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Cistus laurifolius laurel-leaved rockrose
The laurel-leaved rock rose, found naturally in southwestern Europe has lovely, leathery leaves, dark green above, and gray to brown and furry beneath. A handsome, evergreen shrub, to 5 ft tall and wide. Spring flowers have overlapping petals of white, suffused with yellow at base and dark yellow stamens. More frost hardy that some Cistus, to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Cistaceae $14 2D

Clematis x cartmanii 'Joe'

Clematis x cartmanii 'Joe'
Tough evergreen clematis, spectacularly floriferous with white, cup-shaped flowers that nearly hide the foliage in early spring. This cross between New Zealand species C. marmoraria and C. paniculata is a non-climber, to 5-6 ft tall, happy spilling its fern-like, cut foliage over walls or containers or tied upright to display the gorgeous flowers. Full sun with good drainage, regular summer water, and protection to keep the roots cool. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Ranunculaceae $15 2D

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Clivia miniata kaffir lily
Patio or container plant with huge umbels of bright orange flowers. These are seedlings from a superior flowering form and may take two years to flower. Evergreen leaves. Will take shade. Tender.
Amaryllidaceae $28 4in

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Coniogramme emeiensis
This evergreen leathery fern native to western China makes a great addition to the woodland garden and also does well as a house plant. To about 18" tall and spreading 2' wide, graceful dissected fronds add bold texture planted with finer woodland dwellers like Oxalis or maiden hair fern. Evenly moist well drained soil(not saturated) in bright indirect light. USDA zone 7.
Pteridaceae $18 4D

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Coniogramme gracilis Japanese Bamboo Fern
A useful, narrow-leaved fern that deserves more attention. Unlike its cousin, Coniogramme japonica, this fern (recently elevated to species level) remains smaller and tighter in formation, reaching about 3' in width and 15-18" in height. Truthfully, it doesn't look much like a fern but closer to a dwarf bamboo. Excellent for hillsides and thicket plantings beneath high-canopied trees where rich, moist soil is guaranteed. Part sun to light shade best. Hardy to USDA zone 7.
$16 4D

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Convallaria majalis 'Albostriata'
Very cool pinstriped lily-of-the-valley that grows to 9" tall in colonies. One of the most useful groundcovers for shade, this one adds a distinctive contrast to the green of shade gardens by its delicate, variegated appearance. Spreads easily but will need to be divided over time to maintain flowering. Plant in a woodsy soil in filtered sun or deep shade, underneath trees or among other woodland plants, such as ferns and crinums. USDA zone 3-8.
$11 4in

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Coprosma acerosa ssp. brunnea opal berry
Tangled, sprawling, ever-brown shrub from New Zealand, forming springy, weed-supressing shrub to 3 ft tall and wide - one of those New Zealand plants that looks dead but isn't. A striking shrub with the best color in full sun where soil is lean and the best growth in well-drained soil with occasional summer water. Insignificant flower are followed by brilliant blue berries, nice with the brownish foliage. Expand your color palette! Cold hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8. (Also known as Coprosma brunnea and C. acerosa.)
Rubiaceae $14 3D

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Cornus wilsoniana ghost dogwood
A small tree to about 30 ft in time with a rounded crown to 15 to 20 ft wide. Attractive grey-green semi-evergreen leaves with pale undersides and foamy clusters of small white flowers in abundance in spring followed by small black fruit in fall. Smooth white bark (the ghostly source of the common name) develops as trees mature. Sun to afternoon shade with consistent summer moisture. Stunning specimen year round for irrigated street side or garden. USDA zone 6
Cornaceae $15 2D

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Corokia x virgata 'Frosted Chocolate'
New from New Zealand where a genus with only 4 species has produced amazing forms and colors, this dazzling shrub, to about 6 ft tall x 4 ft wide, has chocolate-maroon leaves with silvery undersides on silvery stems. Small, yellow flowers lead to fruit that is a light purple aging to nearly maroon. Sun or part shade in hottest climates with even summer moisture. A good small-scale background plant or pot specimen planted with contrasting colors. Frost hardy to the upper end of zone 8.
Argophyllaceae $16 2D

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Corokia x virgata 'Orangerie'
A Cistus introduction. Though we would like to say this lovely plant is a result of years of careful hybridization under tightly controlled circumstances, we actually found it growing on the floor of one of the greenhouses as a tiny seedling. This grows as other C. x virgata forms, to a 6-8 ft shrub, but with a more upright form and butter-yellow-aging-copper-orange leaves with reflective, nearly white, undersides. In the garden, some summer water, the foliage showing warm yellow in light shade to deeper orange in sun. Very good container specimen. Great when planted with burgundies or other dark foliage plants. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Argophyllaceae $16 2D

Corokia x virgata 'Sunsprite'

Corokia x virgata 'Sunsprite'variegated wire netting bush
A Cistus introduction, this is one of two all-yellow seedlings that have occurred in our nursery -- we wish we could say through great effort and hybridization, but no....we just found it in the pathway. For an all-golden plant it is quite vigorous with nearly black stems and sunny yellow leaves that, with bright light, turn a bit orange bronze at the base. Cheery yellow flowers in spring with reddish fruit late in the season if another Corokia happens to be nearby. Might protect from the harshest light in hot summer areas. Wonderful sculptural garden or container plant especially when paired with silver or tangerine colors. Bottom of USDA zone 8 with leanish soil.
Argophyllaceae $16 2D

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Cotoneaster glaucophyllus bright bead cotoneaster
Orange winter berries feed the birds while this small, evergreen shrub provides texture in the garden, the tiny leaves, dark gray-green with lighter undersides, on upright stems that arch with age. To 4 ft tall and spreading to 4-5 ft wide, but easily trimmed to any size. Pinkish-white flowers appear in early summer. Good as a small hedge or ground cover in sun to part shade. Drought tolerant once established but accepts summer water. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 7.
Rosaceae $14 2D

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Cotoneaster rhytidophyllus

Rosaceae $12 4in

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Cupressus gigantea - silver select
From seed shared with us by the UCSC arboretum this beautiful form of a rare Himalayan giant grows to some 30 to 50', eventually reaching much greater size. Deep rooted, durable, this should make a fine garden or street tree where space is allowed, if given some summer water, especially in youth. USDA Zone 7.
Cupressaceae $14 4D

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Cyclamen coum
Native to Bulgaria, Turkey and Iran this classic winter bloomer is an excellent performer in Mediterranean climates. Low growing with rosettes of 1 in rounded leaves form a perfect back drop for the bright flowers held on short stalks. A wonderful plant for dry shade where soil is well-drained, providing foliage pattern all winter and pale pink to magenta flowers from fall to spring. Forms lovely colonies under shrubs and anywhere color is wanted. To 5" tall forming small colonies. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.
Primulaceae $12 2D

Cyclamen hederifolium - silver shades

Cyclamen hederifolium - silver shades
Our seedlings of these fall flowering beauties, taken from isolated plants of entirely silver-leaved forms. The same warm pink flowers appear early, at the end of August, and often continue into October and November giving way to way to sheets of silver leaves. Wonderful when interplanted with black mondo grass (Ophiopogon planiscarpus’Nigrescens’). Easy in USDA zone 6 or above in open areas of light shade and little disturbance. Has been grown successfully as low as zone 4 with culms mulched or planted a bit deep.
Primulaceae $11 4in

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Cyclamen hederifolium [mix from John Weagle]

Primulaceae $11 4in

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Cymbidium ensifolium 'Green Top'

Orchidaceae $24 4in

Cymbidium sinense - Yucca Do Clone

Cymbidium sinense - Yucca Do Clone
Native from Queensland, Australia to Japan, a slowly spreading perennial, to 12-18" tall, with green, strappy leaves from a pseudo bulb. Yellow and green flowers often have a maroonish blush at the base and always the intense fragrance of lemons in late winter to mid spring, occasionally in autumn. This vigorous garden clone shared with us years ago by the great Yucca Do Nursery. For damp but well-drained light shade. Frost hardy to brief periods in upper USDA zone 7. However, we recommend protection during long periods below 15 to 20 F, mid to upper zone 8. Superb pot plant to bring indoors while in flower.
Orchidaceae $22 4D

Cyrtanthus brachyscyphus

Cyrtanthus brachyscyphusdobo lily
Orange-red, bell-shaped flowers rise above grass-like foliage for a long season in spring and summer. This South African bulb, a tender amaryllis relation, was shared with us by Nevin Smith of Watsonville. Foliage is semi-evergreen in mid USDA zone 9. Best in bright shade with well-drained soil and average summer water. A great container plant for the patio or in a plunge bed where it can be put away for the hard winter. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Amaryllidaceae $12 4D

Cyrtanthus breviflorus - bright yellow

Cyrtanthus breviflorus - bright yellow
A robust form from the Drakensburg Mountains of South Africa, collected by plantsman Panayoti Kelaidis, with strap-like leaves emerging in spring followed by yellow trumpets that first look a bit like daffodils. Best in bright conditions and well-drained but summer-damp soil. Frost hardy to at least 0 and 10F, USDA zone 7. Have proven hardy in the ground in Colorada. Stunning pot specimen.
Amaryllidaceae $14 2D

Cyrtanthus mackenii - yellow

Cyrtanthus mackenii - yellowifafa lily
From a beautiful genus -- akin to a red agapanthus -- springing forth with leaves emerging in late spring and dangly flowers, usually orange, but dazzlingly golden yellow in this form. To 12-18" for bright conditions and well drained but summer damp soil. As its high, Drakensburg Mtn., South Africa, habitat suggests, hardy to between 0 and 10F, USDA zone 7, if well mulched. Stunning pot specimen.
Amaryllidaceae $12 2D

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Cyrtanthus sanguineus
One of the boldest and brightest of this South African genus, but wouldn't you know, not the hardiest. Gray-green leaves from 12-18", with spikes of warm orange flowers to over 2" in length, at any time, but particularly late summer and autumn. Fairly rapidly clumping to 18" or more, has been evergreen for us most years in the garden, but temperatures in the low to mid-20's will "deciduify" it quickly, and we consider it hardy to only a bit below, 20F. Superb in containers. Bright light and occasional summer monsoons for best performance. USDA zone 9.
Amaryllidaceae $14 4D

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Cyrtanthus sanguineus - large flowered form Fire lily

Amaryllidaceae $14 4D

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Cyrtomium fortunei japanese holly fern
Leaves are dark green on this Japanese species, to 2 ft tall, forming 2-3 ft wide clumps of substantial dull green evergreen fronds. Handsome in part to full shade planted in rich, well-drained soil that is watered regularly in summer. Mulch to maintain consistent moisture. A beautiful addition to the woodland garden Frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 6. A fine and frost hardy container specimen.
Dryopteridaceae $018 4D

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Danae racemosa poet's laurel
Out of the Middle East comes a slow-to-propagate and hard-to-find evergreen shrub for the shade garden. Handsome AND drought tolerant, this 3 ft shrub has arching stems with waxy green leaves once used to crown athelets and poets. A nobel history as well! White summer flowers are not showy but produce large red-ornage berries that last through autumn and winter. Part shade to shade with water to establish. Frost hardy to at least 0F, USDA zone 7.
Marattiaceae $18 2D

Dasylirion leiophyllum

Dasylirion leiophyllumsotol

Asparagaceae $16

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Davallia trichomanoides squirrel's foot fern
A fern just as cute as its name, fine glossy foliage springs from the top of creeping rhizomes covered in petable tawny fur. Mature foliage can be up to about a foot tall and can spread to form 2 ft wide colonies in time. An epiphyte, they are great in small containers hanging or mounted where the fuzzy feet can cascade down. An easy attractive houseplant, it likes good drainage and to dry out a bit between waterings (do not overwater) for bright indirect light. USDA zone 9.
Davalliaceae $16 4in

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Delosperma 'Pizzink Dizzle-Izzle'
A Cistus introduction from our own ice-king, Tim Hanis. This 3-4" tall, 14-16" wide, densely-clumping little ice plant with olive-green leaves that supports very cheery, purple-pink flowers over a very long season, from early spring to late autumn in mild climates, somewhat shorter in cold. Particularly dizzling when viewed spilling over walls or out of containers, but also useful as as a small-scale groundcover in any well-drained soil with bright light. Responds well to summer watering, though dry in late season to increase hardiness. Zone 5, at least.
Aizoaceae $11 4in

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Delosperma napiforme

Aizoaceae $8 4in

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Delosperma x 'Anzac' [x. 21.001]

AIZoaceae $8

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Dendrobium kingianum - cl. 2 Rock Orchid
Epiphytic orchid that handles cool temperatures and extended drought like a charm. A tough and variable species from E. Australia with flowers from white-pink to magenta-red and leaves from spring-green to winter-purple. Withstands temperatures down into the 20s F and sunny droughts for months at a time -- Mediterranean coastal climate stuff. Outstanding container plant. Beginners (probably) won't kill it, greenthumbs will make it thrive.
Orchidaceae $16

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Dendrobium kingianum [cerise]
Epiphytic orchid that handles cool temperatures and extended drought like a charm. A tough and variable species from E. Australia with magenta-red flowers and leaves from spring-green to winter-purple. Withstands temperatures down into the 20s F and sunny droughts for months at a time -- Mediterranean coastal climate stuff. Outstanding container plant. Beginners (probably) won't kill it, greenthumbs will make it thrive.
Orchidaceae $16 4in

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Dianella tasmanica 'Ellen Smart'
From friend and superb gardener Ellen Smart, grown in her Ridgefield WA garden for decades, this Australian native forms spreading clumps of strappy green leaves 2 to 3' tall by a similar width in a about 5 years. With clusters of small nodding flowers robbins-egg blue with yellow stamens, but wait there's more! Cobalt blue fruit forms on long stalks held near the top of the leaves in summer and autumn for much added interest. Has remained evergreen to 10 degrees or so. For 3/4 sun to dappled shade USDA zone 7b/8a How about that?
Asphodelaceae $14 4D

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Dichelostemma congestum fork toothed ookow
One of our most ubiquitous and beautiful interior western Oregon and California native bulbs -- related to Brodiaea pulchella but flowering later, often as late as May and June -- found in varied habitats from open grasslands to cliffs. Fully spreading colonies of chive-like leaves emerging in winter and deepest blue flowers bunched closely together that nod in the lightest breeze. One of the most garden tolerant of our native borodias. Full sun to light shade, prefer little if any summer water. USDA zone 6.
Asparagaceae $12 2D

Dichelostemma ida-maia

Dichelostemma ida-maiacalifornia firecracker plant
Clusters of green-tipped, dark red flowers in early summer on 18-24” long stems brighten any garden. Grassy foliage sprouts in late winter and goes dormant just as late spring flowers are opening. This West Coast native hybrid prefers sun to part shade and dry summers, accepting moisture only when actively growing. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.
Asparagaceae $12 3D

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Dichroa febrifuga 'UBC' evergreen chinese hydrangea
Possibly the most exquisite form yet of this delightful genus, shared with us by the University of British Columbia Botanical Garden, one of the best public gardens in North America. This southern Chinese collection grows only to about 3 ft with 3-4" leaves lightly encased by silver hairs. The generous clusters of fertile blue flowers produce pea sized clusters of cobalt colored fruit in fall through spring, held exquisitely above the foliage. Another plant for shade - or at least protection from hot afternoon sun - with even moisture. It has withstood aboot 0F, USDA zone 7, at UBC in their protected woodlands.
Hydrangeaceae $16 4D

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Dierama x 'Tomato Red'

IRidaceae $14 2D

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Disporopsis fuscopicta soloman deal
Wonderful small group of evergreen Solomon seals, this one spreading to small patches of 1 ft tall, unbranched stalks with shiny rounded leaflets and chartreuse flowers in mid spring. A terrific evergreen element for the woodland or subtropical garden and appreciative of even summer moisture and shade in dry places. Has been root hardy, recovering in the spring especially with snow cover in areas as far north as USDA zone 4. Who'da thunk it of this plant from far southern China?
Asparagaceae $16 4D

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Disporopsis pernyi
Another of the increasingly abundant evergreen Solomon seals from southern China, this 1 ft tall - or a little more -- dark green leaved perennial spreads slowly to clumps of 3-4 ft and produces green tipped chartreuse to cream flowers in mid spring. Similar in habit to A. fuscopicta but with much narrower leaflets. Prefers summer moisture and capable of growing in amazingly dark places. Frost hardy and evergreen to USDA zone 7; colder with protection.
Liliaceae $14 4in

Disporopsis pernyi 'Bill Baker'

Disporopsis pernyi 'Bill Baker'evergreen solomon's seal
Neatly compact, evergreen solomon's seal, spreading into clusters of dark green stems to only 18" tall with shiny green, 5" leaves and, in late spring to early summer, tiny white, sweetly aromatic bell-flowers hanging from the leaf undersides. A perfect size to fit under larger shrubs or small trees in the shaded garden or set amongst ferns. Drought tolerant once established but enjoys summer water especially in very dry periods. Frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 6.
Liliaceae $12 3D

Disporum cantoniense 'Shina-No-Buki'

Disporum cantoniense 'Shina-No-Buki'fairy bells
We thought we had a wonderful form of evergreen fairy bells ‘til plantsman Ted Stephens shared this lovely creature with its branching stems and leaves centered light gold. Having arrived here from Japan only a couple of years ago, ours has been a “doer” in our shade garden and has led to the retiring of other variegated clones. Gorgeous underplanted with black mondo grass. Dappled sun is best with even summer moisture. Stems that look tattered in spring can be easily cut to the ground. Evergreen to the mid teens F and root hardy in USDA zone 7, possibly into zone 6.
Liliaceae $22 4in

Dorycnium hirsutum

Dorycnium hirsutum
This grey-leaved, pea shrub is a workhorse in the garden. The leaves gleam in the sun; the flowers, pink and white, are subtle and attractive; and the red seeds in star-shaped pods provide a long season of interest. To 3 ft tall x 2.5 ft. wide in full to part sun, they need lean, well-drained soil and little supplemental summer water once established. Easy. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.
Fabaceae $14 2D

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Dryopteris labordei Golden Mist Fern
Great for the shady or woodland garden, the wonderful golden yellow new fronds of this fern stand out in the shade, maturing to a deep glossy green. To about 2' tall by 15” wide, and even larger in time. Prefers part to full shade, with regular moisture. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5 and evergreen through most winters in the Pacific Northwest.
Dryopteridaceae $15 4D

Dryopteris pseudofilix-mas

Dryopteris pseudofilix-masmexican male fern
Handsome, vase-shaped fern found in Mexico's high, alpine forests, in clumps to 4 ft tall and wide that produce sturdy, upright fronds throughout the growing season, an unusual habit in this genus. Prefers a sheltered location in part to full shade, and rich, hummusy soil with consistent moisture for best appearance. Cutting back old fronds in late winter allows for a fresh new appearance in spring. Evergreen in warmer zones and frost hardy to -20F, USDA zone 5.
Dryopteridaceae $11 4D

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Dudleya cymosa - Bowland Lake Road canyon live forever
One of the more attractive "live-forevers," this genus is a winter rainfall loving echeveria from west of the mountains from Baja to Oregon from 500 to 8000 ft. Rosettes to 5" of purple-gray leaves cling to shady boulders and produce spring flowers of coral-orange atop tall, red stems. Wonderful rock garden plant or pot specimen for VERY well-drained soil, a bit of summer water, and dry winters. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 lower if kept winter dry, e.g. in a moveable pot.
Crassulaceae $14 4in

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Echeveria 'Aquarius'
Graceful evergreen succulent with large 8" rosettes of delicately ruffled soft blue leaves, adorned with pink edges. Loves hot sunny spots in the garden, excellent in containers. Sun to light dappled shade and well drained soil. USDA Zone 9.
Crassulaceae $12 4in

Echeveria 'Black Prince'

Echeveria 'Black Prince'
Lovely and attractive succulent, the small rosettes, to 3" wide, having chocolatey, triangular leaves with the sharp tips edged in yellow. Leaves emerge green and darken with age, a nice contrast to the red flowers on short stalks that appear in late fall to early winter. Best in full sun to light shade for good color. Well-drained soil suits with occasional summer water for plants in the ground, a bit more for plants in pots. Frost hardy to 20F, USDA zone 9 so best in pots with winter protection.
Crassulaceae $014 4in

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Echeveria 'Lipstick' lipstick echeveria
Ready for a night on the town with their favorite lipstick! Larger than normal rosettes of pointed, fleshy leaves, waxy green marked dark red on the tips and edges, accentuated by drought stress. 1 ft tall x up to 10" wide, larger than most. Summer flowers are pink on nodding stems. Sun is best with occasional water, allowing pots to dry out some before adding moisture. Frost hardy to 20F, USDA zone 9, so best in container where temperatures drop below.
Crassulaceae $012 4in

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Echeveria 'Scarlett' scarlet echeveria
Large 10 - 12 inch rosettes of pointed, fleshy leaves, waxy green centered and blushed with red, the whole rosette turning red with more light and drought stress. Summer flowers are pink on nodding stems. Sun is best with occasional water, allowing pots to dry out some before adding moisture. Frost hardy to 20F, USDA zone 9, so best in container where temperatures drop below.
Crassulaceae $9 4in

Echeveria agavoides 'Red Tip'

Echeveria agavoides 'Red Tip'carpet echeveria
Sweet and very cold hardy echeveria with fleshy leaves, light green blushed red on the tips and edges. Round rosettes can reach 6" tall x 1 ft side, topped by red flowers with a yellow tip in spring through early summer. Tolerant of sun or shade preferring lean, well-drained soil and only occasional summer water. Frost hardy to 15F, or so, mid USDA zone 8 so possible in the ground. Also fine in containers.
Crassulaceae $9 4in

Echeveria runyonii 'Topsy Turvy'
A plant with a sense of humor, this fasciated sport has cupped and undulated blue leaves on small rosettes, under about 6", with pink to salmon flowers in spring and summer. Prefers mineral soil. A great plant for dish gardens, containers, or planting out where temperatures fall to 20F, USDA zone 9. Fun for the whole family.
Crassulaceae $9 4in

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Echeveria setosa
This clumping echeveria features fuzzy green foliage with pointed red tips. Prefers full to part sun in well-drained soil with occasional summer water. In spring through early summer, this lovely gem rewards you with red and yellow flowers held above the rosettes. Great trough or container plant. Hardy to USDA zone 9.
Crassulaceae $8 4in

Echinopsis oxygona

Echinopsis oxygonaeaster lily cactus
Fast-growing, round little cactus, quickly offsetting to form large, handsome clumps that produce beautiful, trumpet-shaped, fragrant flowers on long, tubular stems: flowers that open at night and last only one day. Blooms from late spring through summer in colors from white tinted pink to lavender-pink. Thrives in sun to half-shade in porous and lean, well-drained soil with judicious summer water. Frost hardy to 15F, mid USDA zone 8 if kept dry in winter. Otherwise a successful indoor plant in good light.
Cactaceae $14 4in

Echium russicum

Echium russicum
This extremely hardy European echium is smaller than most of its kin, to only 2 ft tall with tall spikes of saturated dark red flowers. To 2 ft tall in clumps to 18" wide. Though considered biennial, these are perennial in well-drained soil that is very lean. Also seeds itself in undisturbed gravel mulch. Sun is best. Tolerant of drought but intolerant of transplanting. Frost hardy and perennial in USDA zone 7.
Boraginaceae $14 4D

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Echium tuberculatum
Prickly leaves with polka dots and little hairs -- yea! --on this bushy plant to 18” in compact clumps. Lilac to purple red flowers all summer. Full sun and well-drained, humusy soil are best. Frost hardy in zone 8.
Boraginaceae $12 4D

Echium wildpretii

Echium wildpretiitower of jewels
An extraordinary addition to the dry garden, one of the plants in our garden that receives the most comment when in bloom with its huge column of dark red-pink flowers, to 4-8 ft tall, rising out of the low-growing rosette of narrow, silvery leaves. This native of the Canary Islands is a biennial, forming a handsome, 2 ft rosette in the first year and blooming spectacularly beginning in spring of the second year. Produces abundant seed to perpetuate itself, especially if surrounding soil is loose and undisturbed. Best in full sun, very well-drained soil, and little or no summer water once established. Frost hardy in USDA zone 9.
Boraginaceae $16 4D

Embothrium coccineum

Embothrium coccineumchilean flametree
The Chilean flametree is stunning in late spring/early summer when it covers itself with bright scarlet flowers, tiny red ribbons. This protea relation is an excellent garden plant, evergreen in mild winters, deciduous when the temperature spends any time in the teens F. A slender tree, to 25 ft eventually in full to part sun, with regular water. Loves cool ground so best in a north aspect and/or with ground covering plants to protect the roots. No phosphorous fertilizer! Cold hardy to USDA zone 7b.
Proteaceae $18 2D

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Epimedium pinnatum 'Thunderbolt'
The cheeriest of the evergreen epimediums, this with 18" clumps of glossy green, streaked purple and bronzy orange in the winter produces early to mid-Spring creamy yellow and white flowers in some abundance. A very good year-round plant for shade or morning sun, somewhat drought tolerant, though regular summer water boosts growth. We cut ours back every couple of years in mid-Winter to renew foliage. USDA Zone 5 or 6.
Berberidaceae $16 4D

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Epimedium sagittatum horny goat weed
A deciduous epimedium from China reputed to have aphrodisiac effects -- only if ingested, we assume but we don't know for sure. To 20" tall in clumps of upright stems topped with heart-shaped leaves of pale green that turn yellow, bronze and red in autumn before winter dormancy. Pale pink flowers stand above the foliage in spring. Good groundcover for shady areas in rich soil with consistent moisture, though willing to accept periods of drought. Frost hardy to -20F, USDA zone 5.
Berberidaceae $18 4D

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Erigeron glaucus 'Blanco Blanc' beach daisy
A wonderful native coastal fleabane to 6" high by 2'. Full sun, scant summer water and well drained soil. Great for pollinators. Flower is blanco! USDA zone 8 to (hardy to 10F).
Asteraceae $11 4in

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Eryngium pandanifolium false screw pine
From Brazil into northern Argentina and the largest Eryngium we offer, this is literally a carrot-on-a-stick. Fast growing, evergreen perennial creating stunning rosettes of long, strap-shaped, blue-gray leaves -- to 8 ft or more by only a couple of inches wide. The single rosettes clump after the first year, making an impressive statement. We divide ours every couple of years as single or few rosettes are the most striking. The flowers spikes can reach 3-4 ft above the rosette with sputnik-like florets of cream tinted red. The bees love 'em. Best in bright light and happiest with dense soil and poor drainage -- See, told ya -- though free draining soil is satisfactory if provided even moisture. A great candidate for continuing the dry or rosette look into damper places. USDA zone 8, 7 with mulch.
Apiaceae $14 4in

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Eryngium paniculatum sea holly
Yet another graceful evergreen sea holly, this from south central Chile and growing to about 18” with arching, shiny, spring green leaves, often faintly marked silver. The flowers in spring and summer are decorated with sputnik florets, small white flowers, and are particularly attractive at a distance. Drought tolerant, though summer water is appreciated. Sun to light dappled shade and tolerant of poorly drained soil. Frost hardy to 10 to 12F – USDA zone 8, or even a bit lower.
Apiaceae $12

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Eryngium sp.

Apiaceae $12 2D

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Eucalyptus perriniana [tall form] spinning gum
This is the eucalyptus most often seen as cut foliage at the florist, with the juvenile leaves that encircle the stem. This from a high elevation collection that is upright and stately, quickly reaching 30 ft, with flaking bark and long, narrow adult leaves to 6" with juvenile foliage showing as well. Requires full sun, lean and well-drained soil, and little summer water once established. Easy and very frost hardy, to 0F, USDA zone 7, or lower.
Myrtaceae $018 3" tree

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Eucomis pallidiflora ssp. pole-evansii giant pineapple lily
From South Africa, a wonderful and hard-to-find perennial with rosettes of bright, pale-green leaves, to 3 ft tall and 4-5" wide, appearing in late spring and topped in late summer by creamy, green-center florets in a long cone with tufts of green leaves at the top. An impressive presence in sun to partial light shade. Tolerates poor drainage but prefers well-drained soil, especially in winter wet, and performs best with average summer water. Mulch and drainage improve winter cold hardiness to 0F, USDA zone 7. A fine container plant.
Asparagaceae $14 2D

Eucomis vandermerwei

Eucomis vandermerwei dwarf spotted pineapple lily
A rare pineapple lily and one of the most graceful, this form has prolific rosettes, to 6" tall in clumps to 15" wide, of ruffled leaves tinted purple with darker polka dots and a pinkish flower spike of only 6-8" in height. Native to the Drakensberg Mtns in rocky crevices, they need very good drainage for winter survival. A lovely perennial bulb and easy with summer water anywhere the ground does not freeze deeply, e.g., mid to upper USDA zone 7. Otherwise a very nice container specimen.
Liliaceae $11 3D

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Euonymus japonica 'Rykujo'
Tiny, tiny, tiny dwarf version of this evergreen shrublet, rising to only 6". The rounded dark leaves are tightly arranged into a pagoda-like effect. Need I say bonsai? Sun to shade with regular summer water. USDA zone 8.
Celastraceae $17 3D

Euphorbia mauritanicapencil milkbush
The common name, pencil milkbush, describes the round, green branches that exude white sap when injured. A many branched shrub from South Africa, to 3-4 ft tall, with tiny evergreen leaves, silver-gray and succulent, appearing only on young stems. Midwinter flowers are yellow on stem ends. Drought tolerant. Sun and good drainage. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 with protection.
Euphorbiaceae $16 2D

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Farfugium japonicum 'Argenteum'
An evergreen form in cultivation for many years though never common, this slow grower for dappled shade and moist soil produces 6-8" delicately rounded leaves streaked dark green and white. Great plant for containers or to add brightness to a shady spot. Frost hardy and evergreen to mid USDA zone 8; regrows in spring with mulch in zone 7.
Asteraceae $18 4D

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Fatsia japonica 'Shiny Happy'
Bold foliage for a shady spot. This garden workhorse is perfect for the hard to maintain area. Evergreen, multi-stemmed shrub to 10 ft with glossy green, palmate leaves, often over 10” across. Whitish flowers are clustered in spherical globes held above the leaves and attractive to pollinators, followed by black berries. A staple of area dentist office landscapes that can be transformed and transforming in the garden. Regular summer water. Fully frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Araliaceae $18 2D

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Ferula communis 'Gigantea' giant carrot
A giant carrot from the Mediterranean that reaches 4-6 ft tall in its early years, displaying its lacy, fern-like leaves, silvery blue on white stems. When mature, in 2 or several years, plants bloom and reach further upward, producing stunning yellow flowers in umbels 1 ft or more across on branched stems that rise above the foliage to 10-12 ft! Ooo... Then, being monocarpic, the mother plant dies, having produced seeds for more giants and more fun. Requires well-drained soil and summer sun. Goes dormant in summer dryness and reappears with the rain. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Apiaceae $14 4D

Ferula communis ssp. glauca

Ferula communis ssp. glaucagiant black-leaf fennel
A giant fennel from the Mediterranean that reaches 4-6 ft tall in its early years, displaying its lacy, fern-like leaves, silvery blue on white stems. When mature, in 2 or several years, plants bloom and reach further upward, producing stunning yellow flowers in umbels 1 ft or more across on branched stems that rise above the foliage to 10-12 ft! Ooo... Then, being monocarpic, the mother plant dies, having produced seeds for more giants and more fun. Requires well-drained soil and summer sun. Goes dormant in summer dryness and reappears with the rain. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Apiaceae $12 3D

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Festuca californica - Hull Mountain California fescue
A Cistus introduction, one of our fav western native grasses, this northern CA collection has particularly dense 18x18 in. clumps of upright wide bluish leaves and abundant upheld flowering stems to about 4 ft. Particularly striking are the stems, aging flaxen gold in contrast to the blue leaves. excellent for gardens with summer drought and especially good under large shrubs or trees, their evergreen leaves maintaining a presence in the winter. Sun to dappled shade fairly good drainage, USDA zone 6
Poaceae $14 4in

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Festuca californica 'Blue Meadow'
A Cistus Nursery introduction, widespread and beautiful clumping evergreen grass native throughout the oak woodlands of California and western Oregon. This with particularly wide bicolor green and light blue leaves, inhabits a high meadow in Oregon's Siskiyous mountains. This selection, to 18 to 24in height is happy in sun or shade and particularly happy under oh-say...Manzanitas. 4' flowering stalks mid to late season. Low water, but can take some garden watering. USDA zone 6
Poaceae $14 4in

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Festuca californica SBH 13187.1 C
A Cistus Nursery introduction, widespread and beautiful clumping evergreen grass native throughout the oak woodlands of California and western Oregon. This inhabits a high meadow in Oregon's Siskiyous mountains. This selection, to 18 to 24in height is happy in sun or shade and particularly happy under oh-say...Manzanitas. 4' flowering stalks mid to late season. Low water, but can take some garden watering. USDA zone 6
Poaceae $14 4in

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Festuca glauca 'Beyond Blue' beyond blue fescue
A selection of the classic blue fescue that retains its intense powder blue color throughout the summer. Compact mounds to 9 to 12 inches high and 18 inches wide are topped in summer by upright flower stalks aging in late summer to an attractive buff tan. Drought tolerant once established but occasional summer water is beneficial. Full sun to light or afternoon shade in well drained soil. Great planted with other summer drought plants and in containers. Divide periodically to maintain vigor. USDA zone 4
Poaceae $12 4in

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Festuca roemeri
This west coast bunch grass is a native of upland prairie and oak savanna A particularly blue selection from Oregon's Willamette valley. A cool season grower forming tufts of fine textured leaves to 8" tall, it is well adapted to our mediterranean climate of dry summers and wetter winters. One foot spikes of loose buff-tan flowers appear in late spring. Cold hardy to USDA zone 6 possibly 5.
Poaceae $12 2D

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Ficus tikoua 'Tony Reznicek'
Shared with us by the superb plantsman of the same name (not Ficus but Tony), from his collection from the mountains of Yunnan nearly 3000' higher than the plant generally grows. A pleasant surprise to see this as a foundation planting in his Michigan garden. Spreading groundcover to only 6" in height covering boulders wall (slow moving pets) but actually only a moderate growth rate to 4' across in a few years. Three inch leaves and small reddish "figs" more for the birds than for consumption. Evergreen into the mid 20's F, wood hardy as low as USDA zone 6. Sun to dappled shade, summer water in dry climates.
Moraceae $16 4in

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Filipendula ulmaria 'Aurea' queen of the meadows
Interesting rose relation with bright chartreuse foliage and plumes of creamy flowers from June through August. An herbaceous perennial that forms a clump to about 2 ft wide and high, dying back in the fall and returning in the spring. Best with at least afternoon shade or dappled shade in rich, well-drained soil with some summer water. Easy, tough and frost hardy to -40F, USDA zone 3.
Rosaceae $14 4D

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Fragaria sp. - yellow fruit from Afghanistan yellow afghan strawberry
From a wild collection in the mountains of Afghanistan, this drought tolerant ground covering strawberry produces small, pleasing berries colored an ochre yellow. The flavor is almost like...Hmmmm...Bananas! Treat like other strawberries and grow in part shade to full sun with occasional summer water where dry. Frost hardy to USDA zone 7, possibly lower.
Rosaceae $11

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Fraxinus anomala - Mountain Pass, CA desert ash
This indeed un-ash like little tree comes from the rough and tumble mountains of the Southwest, this collection from the eastern Mojave at about 7000 feet. To only 15 to 20 feet tall, rounded form with round blue green leaves turning yellow in late autumn before falling. Actually an easy garden plant if given well drained soil and bright exposure. Enjoys an occasional monsoon from the garden hose during summer, otherwise exceedingly drough tolerant. USDA zone 5.
Oleaceae $16 4D

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Fuchsia lycioides

Onagraceae $16 4in

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Galanthus nivalis f. pleniflorus 'Blewbury Tart' Double Snowdrop
Rare and quite beautiful small bulb selection from a plant found in Blewbury, Oxfordshire. Height to 10". This double Snowdrop has small green and white, streaked, outward-facing flowers with the lightest pink-purple edges. Leaves are narrow and grass-like, growing in tufts. Best in part-sun or light shade and planted in rich, organic soil. Excellent in the woodland garden. Spreads slowly. Frost hardy to USDA zone 6.
Amaryllidaceae $12

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Galanthus reginae-olgae ssp. reginae-olgae queen olga's snowdrop
This old favorite and one of the earlier flowering for us often December in to January. An easy doer; grey-green leaves 4-5" in height and typical (sorry snowdrop people), delicate white nodding flowers a green chevron within. With effort these can be "naturalized" into attractive winter patches in the garden. Place in bright winter light and not too soggy soil. USDA zone 4.
$9 2D

Gardenia jasminoides 'Chuck Hayes' PP8755

Gardenia jasminoides 'Chuck Hayes' PP8755hardy double gardenia
Tough, hardy, and lovely gardenia for USDA zone 7, down to 0F, really! Wonderfully fragrant, double white flowers in June and July, and occasionally in autumn when temperatures cool down. Compact evergreen shrub, to 3 ft, blooms in full to half sun with normal garden water. Developed by the late Chuck Hayes and Dan Milbocker at the Virginia Beach Research Station, VA.
Rubiaceae $18 3D

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Gasteraloe - hybrid
As the name might suggest, these intergeneric hybrids have intriguing characteristics of both. This producing rosettes to 8" of blunted leaves of deep emerald green, of course adorned with white polka dots. Believe it. Light orange flowers produced throughout summer. Slowly spreads via rhizomes and can fill a container quite handily in well-drained soil. Keep dryish in winter. Can take some frost. Alas, only hardy to USDA zone 9a. A most striking container specimen.
Aloeaceae $014 4in

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Gasteria baylissiana 'Variegata'
Very small (and adorable) component of the South African Aloe family, this the variegated sport of the species. Each rosette to only 4 inches silvery green streaked and dotted with deep green markings spreading to form tight colonies. Orange and green flowers shaped, indeed, like cute little stomachs held on upright stems. Frost hardy to low to mid 20’s, mid USDA zone 9. Otherwise, a fabulous container plant.
$11 4in

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Gasteria glomerata
This long time favorite South African succulent rapidly grows into a clumping umm... glom of chubby gray leaves in multiple rosettes. One of the more rewarding of the genus, it's topped by orange, globular flowers rising up to 1' in height, for which it's named. Excellent small container plant, well drained soil, bright light, USDA zone 9.
Liliaceae $12 2D

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Gasteria sp. - variegated
Given to us long ago by a Japanese collector, this beautiful member of the South Arican genus grows to 6” with gray-green leaves brushed pearly white. Slow growing but special. Frost hardy to the low 20s of upper teens, but best as a protected pot plant. For sun, greety soil and winter dry.
Liliaceae $11 4in

Genista aetnensis

Genista aetnensismt. etna broom
Graceful and elegant, small tree with sparse, silky leaves and stems that act like leaves. Nearly invisible to the eye until it covers itself in yellow, fragrant pea flowers in mid summer to early fall. Can reach 12-15 ft tall or so with a narrow, weeping habit. This native of Sicily takes full sun, lean soil that drains well, and little summer water once established. Does not reseed! Frost hardy to 5F, USDA zone 7b.
Fabaceae $16 2D

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Genista lydia

Fabaceae $12 4in

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Gladiolus flanaganii
Stunning, red gladiola, one of many species of South African bulbs, these seductive creatures found growing on cliffs in the Drakensberg mountains in places with extremely difficult access, hence the common name, suicide lily. Not dangerous in the garden, needing well-drained soil in sun to produce spikes of red flowers in summer before becoming dormant. Grassy leaves return in late fall and winter. Somewhat drought tolerant but accepting of moderate summer water. Frost hardy to 15F, mid USDA zone 8.
Liliaceae $12 3D

Graptopetalum paraguayense

Graptopetalum paraguayensemother of pearl plant
Surprisingly tough, silvery purple succulent from the state of Tamaulipas in NE Mexico (not Paraguay as one might guess), with rosettes to 6" across. Very attractive spilling over pots or planters. Quite drought tolerant, but grows quickly with summer moisture. Full sun to part shade. This clone has been hardy for many years in Portland and can be planted out where temperatures seldom drop below 15F, mid USDA zone 8.
Crassulaceae $12

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Grindelia stricta ssp. platyphylla 'Mendocino' Gumweed

Asteraceae $12 4D

Gunnera perpensa

Gunnera perpensariver pumpkin
A "dinosaur" plant for the smaller lizards, this South African native perennial growing up to 2 ft tall with rounded 6" wavy, green leaves and conical spikes of green flowers to 18-24 inches in summer. They love moisture, swampy moisture, in sun to part shade, dying back in the colder months to reappear in spring. Perfect at the edge of a pond or water feature. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Gunneraceae $14 4in

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