Plant Catalog for Mail Order: Fall 2021

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Machilus thunbergii
Another favorite Avocado relative, this with a long history in elite gardens of the coastal Northwest and Southeast. To 20-25', with flattened sprays of branches, and an upright, humble form. The 3-5" shiny, green tinted blue and copper (especially in new growth) leaves can be seen from quite a distance. Superb small garden tree, if provided occasional deep watering, and sun to filtered shade. Southern China. USDA zone 7.
Lauraceae $14 4D

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Mahonia eurybracteata 'Cistus Silvers'
Fireworks for the shade! We've been playing around for some time selecting these platinum babies (now seen as M. eurybracteata). To 5' with few branches and rosettes of 2-3' leaves emerging bronze (lots of precious metals here). Easy for dappled shade to full sun in cooler climates, fall and winter flowers of bright yellow blushed.. um.. copper. Occasional summer watering, excellent focal point, USDA zone 7.
Berberidaceae $18 2D

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Mahonia fortunei chinese mahonia
This Chinese mahonia is elegant in its simplicity. Unbranched stems rise 3 to 4 feet with fern-like compound leaves, the leaflets narrow and green above, more yellow below. Clusters of lemony yellow flowers appear in late fall followed by purple black berries. Spreads slowly. Thrives in shade or sun, prefering more sun in colder climates, and prone to mildew in Pacific Northwest shade. Supplemental summer water in dry areas. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8; root hardy in zone 7 with protection.
Berberidaceae $16 3D

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Mahonia fortunei [DJHC]
From Plantsman Dan Hinkley, this fine selection displays leaves about half the size of typical species, with very narrow leaflets, often tinted red upon emergence. The leaves only to 5-6" in entirety, the plant a graceful 5-6' but can be kept smaller. But wait, there's more. Also, not prone to mildew as others of the species. Sun to dappled shade, summer water where applicable, upper USDA zone 7.
Berberidaceae $14 4in

Mahonia gracilipes

Mahonia gracilipes
Peek at the brilliant white leaf undersides and fall in love. This rare, Chinese evergreen mahonia, introduced into western horticulture in 1980 by Roy Lancaster, has graceful, blue-green, compound leaves with surprising white undersides, and, in summer, sprays of pretty, delicate flowers with purple-red petals and ivory interiors. Sturdy and choice. Native to shady limestone cliffs, though it’s quite happy in garden conditions in full sun with moist soil to nearly full shade. Can reach about 6 ft high x 5 ft wide eventually. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Berberidaceae $18 2D

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Mahonia leschenaultii
Large graceful shrub(even small tree if lifted into shape) reaching 8' or higher with nearly equal spread. 12" leaves with multiple soft-spined leaflets make contrasting background for the autumn trusses of cream/yellow flowers and subsequent purple blue fruit. The eventual trunks are adorned with a straw-colored lacework of bark. full sun to light shade, even summer water with decently drained soil. USDA zone 8a or slightly colder
Berberidaceae $14 2D

Mahonia pinnata ssp. insularis 'Shnilemoon'

Mahonia pinnata ssp. insularis 'Shnilemoon'
From the channel islands off southern California, this form named by the fabulous University of California Santa Cruz Arboretum. Makes a rounded shrub of upright branches with multiply-pinnate leaves, nearly round and the brightest spring green, held on very pretty, rather gracile, deep brown stems. All this adorned with cheery yellow flowers in late winter and spring and blue berries beyond. This is one of the most unique forms of a species native from southern Oregon to Baja. Prefers Mediterranean conditions....sorry Florida. Frost hardy to mid USDA zone 8. Tolerant and pleased with long periods of summer drought in either sun or shade.
Berberidaceae $15 4D

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Mahonia sheridaniana
Shared with us by plantsman Roy Lancaster, this rare and graceful shrub with leaflets of 12- 16'' the soft spines pointing forward and yellow flowers mid autumn leading to a typical purple blue fruit. Plants here have grown to 5 to 6 ft. and have added much beauty to shady to dappled sun gardens. prefers even summer moisture well drained soil and seem quite frost hardy to the bottom of USDA zone 8 possibly lower.
Berberidaceae $014 2D

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Maihuenia poeppigii
Dense clusters, up to 3 ft in diameter, of small, succulent nubbins with large thorns. This ground hugging cactus from high altitudes in southern Chile appreciates lots of heat in summer and, of course, very good drainage. Summer drought tolerant; prefers a bit of winter water along with protection from the deluge. USDA zone 5.
$13 4in

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Mammillaria gracilis thimble cactus
One of Sean’s childhood plants, this is a clustering, small cactus from central Mexico that eventually produces 8” mounds covered with crystalline white spines and, in summer, pinkish flowers. Any brightly lit situation is fine, especially those that dry out a bit in winter. A good small rock garden plant where temperatures remain above 20F, USDA zone 9.
Cactaceae $012 4in

Manfreda 'Macho Mocha'

Manfreda 'Macho Mocha'
Possibly a hybrid between Manfreda jaliscana and Agave scabra, this nearly 2 ft plant, from the semi-desert canyons just over the mountains from Monterey, Mexico, boasts deep purple leaves with, indeed, coffee-colored polka dots over the entire plant. For sun, good drainage, and average summer water. Evergreen to 20F and root hardy into the low teens, USDA zone 8.
Amaryllidaceae $14 2in

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Marrubium bourgaei 'All Hallows Green'
Drought tolerant mounding evergreen shrub stays compact and dense to 18" tall spreading to about 2 ft. Attractive quilted grey-green leaves and fuzzy spherical flowers in late spring are a nice bonus. Full sun and with sharp drainage and only occasional summer water once established. USDA zone 7
Lamiaceae $012 4D

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Melicytus angustifolius
From New Zealand, a slender shrub or tree, to 10 ft, that is, surprisingly, in the violet family. Leaves are small and narrow on stiff, angular branches with sharp spines. Summer flowers are yellow tinged with purple and fragrant followed by autumn berries that are white-stained-purple, hanging down in great abundance. Amaze your friends-- yes! a shrubby violet. Sun to part shade with at least occasional summer water. Frost hardy to USDA zone 8b.
Violaceae $14 4in

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Mimulus aurantiacus shrubby monkey flower
Of all the West Coast natives, the shrubby monkey flowers have some of the most to offer. Flowering from spring into summer with large cheery orange flowers, to about 4 ft or more in the wild but can be kept shorter with pruning. Able to withstand summer drought, it will happily go dormant until fall rains begin. Also tolerant of reasonable garden water if soil is well drained and light is bright, flowering year-round in mid USDA zone 8 or above, perennial into USDA zone 7
Phrymaceae / Scrophulariaceae $14 4in

Mimulus cardinalis

Mimulus cardinalisScarlet Monkeyflower
This herbaceous perennial west coast native features downy, semi-sticky, pale green obovate leaves on branching stems to 3' tall and wide. Bearing bright red 1-2" long tubular flowers, this scarlet monkeyflower attracts hummingbirds and other pollinators with its blooms, from early summer through frost. These spread by rhizomes, though also may self sow a bit in optimal conditions, prefering part shade to sun, with rich, moist to wet soil, even standing water for periods, and do not appreciate drying out. USDA zone 7.
Scrophulariaceae $12 4in

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Muehlenbeckia axillaris SBH ? - Steve Newell
low creeping evergreen groundcover
Polygonaceae $9 2D

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Muehlenbeckia complexa 'Nana'
Sweet, evergreen goundcover with tiny, shiny leaves, bonze-tinted when new. 2” tall but spreading into dense patches in full sun or light shade (less dense, perhaps) with regular water. Hardy to 5F and happy along paths or as a filler. USDA Zone 7b.
Polygonaceae $9 4in

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Muehlenbeckia complexa 'Texture Big Leaf'
A straightforward cultivar name for a robust form, shared by Texture Plants of Christchurch, New Zealand, collected quite probably from Three Kings Island. The large leaves, on the same dark stems as others in the genus, can exceed 1" in diameter. Forms a vigorous vine, to 10 ft or more, or a formidable ground cover / spiller. Can root along the stems and could be a bit energetic for the small garden. It can definitely be useful in urban spaces, or where good coverage is wanted in sun to part shade. Spreads slowly or not at all away from summer water, a good control in the American west. Though its origins suggest tenderness, all indications suggest frost hardiness to the single digits F, USDA zone 7b. Wonderful hanging basket or container filler.
Polygonaceae $9 2D

Muehlenbeckia complexa 'Tricolor'

Muehlenbeckia complexa 'Tricolor'tricolor wire grass
A variegated version of the useful, ground-covering wire grass, the leaves splashed with green, white, and pink on dark, wiry stems to only 6" in height, spreading slowly. Evergreen, forming dense mats in sun to part shade in almost any soil but needing some summer water where particularly dry. Very good around steps or larger specimens such as New Zealand flax. Also successful in containers. Frost hardy to 8F, upper edge of USDA zone 7. Sometimes sold as M. axillaris.
Polygonaceae $9 2D

Mukdenia rossii

Mukdenia rossii
Ground-covering perennial, a Heuchera relative from China discovered by the late plantsman, Steve Doonan. Slowly clumping, to 1 ft x 1 ft, in well-drained soil with generous water until established. Quite drought tolerant thereafer. Leaves are a bright, shiny green and the white spring flowers make a nice contrast. Sun to part shade. Frost hardy in USDA zone 4.
Saxifragaceae $9 4D

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Myrtus communis - upright red
This, a result of our hybridizing over the years, forms a most fragrant shrub to 4-6 ft with red stems and upturned leaves, also tinted red especially in new growth. Charming, white spring flowers lead to blue fruit. Otherwise the same as other Myrtus, loving mineral soil, bright light and tolerating of summer drought. Frost hardy to the bottoms of USDA zone 8.
Myrtaceae $14 2D

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Myrtus communis ssp. tarentina
Neat, compact shrub with narrow, glossy green leaves, aromatic of course, and pink-tinged, white flowers followed by white berries -- all rather tiny. Flowers are fragrant and attractive to bees. To 3 ft x 3 ft in 10 years. Best in full sun with very little supplemental water once established. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Myrtaceae $12 2D

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Narcissus cantabricus var. foliosus Daffodil

$14 3D

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Nassella tenuissima

Poaceae $14 4in

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Nectandra salicifolia

Lauraceae $14 3D

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Neolepisorus fortunei fortune's ribbon fern
A fabulous evergreen fern with a very different look than its other fern relatives. Long narrow leaves to about 18 inches form clumps up to about 3 feet wide arising from creeping rhizomes. A woodland creature it perfers rich moist well drained soils in light to deep shade. Very attractive in the understory where its glossy leaves shine in dappled light. Evergreen in USDA zone 8 possibly re-growing from the roots in zone 7
Polypodiaceae $18 4D

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Nerine bowdenii cape flower, guernsey lily
Delightful deep pink flowered amaryllis relative from eastern South Africa, adapted to dry or wet summers provided good drainage and sun. Summer dormant; flowers emerge "nekked" in September to November while leaves appear beginning in December and January. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8; a bit colder with mulch.
Amaryllidaceae $12 4D

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Nerine bowdenii 'Isabel'

Amaryllidaceae $12 3D

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Nerine bowdenii 'Wayne's Rose'
Delightful shell-pink to salmon flowered amaryllis relative from eastern South Africa, adapted to dry summers, or wet, provided good drainage and sun. Summer dormant with flowers emerging "nekked" from September through November with leaves beginning in December and January. This form was selected by the late Wayne Roderick from the collections of the University of California Botanical Garden at Berkeley and is one of the best. USDA zone 7; possibly a wee bit colder with mulch.
Amaryllidaceae $12 4D

Nerine filifolia

Nerine filifolia

Amaryllidaceae $12 4in

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Nerine flexuosa 'Alba'

Amaryllidaceae $12 3D

Nerine humilis - deep pink

Nerine humilis - deep pink
Fabulous floriferous bulbs, these amaryllis relatives from South Africa have masses of rather frilly, deep pink flowers, somewhat more finely textured leaves than others. To 12-14" tall. Summer dormant, the flowers emerging "nekked" September-November after which the leaves appear in December and January, remaining through spring. Adapted to dry or wet summers, provided good drainage and sun. Should be planted with bulb necks slightly above the ground. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 but may lose leaves in the upper teens F. Add mulch for winter protection. A fine container plant.
Amaryllidaceae $8 3D

Nerine x pudica 'Strawberry Sorbet'

Nerine x pudica 'Strawberry Sorbet'
Another nerine cross, this between the coral-pink flowered N. sarniensis and the white N. pudica creating a delicious flower in cheery strawberry pink with a white center. As with others in the genus, these are summer dormant, the flowers emerging "nekked" September - November after which the leaves appear in December and January, remaining through spring. Adapted to dry or wet summers provided good drainage and sun. Should be planted with bulb necks slightly above the ground. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8, but may lose leaves in the upper teens F. Add mulch for winter protection.
Amaryllidaceae $14 3D

Nerium oleander 'Mrs. Roeding'

Nerium oleander 'Mrs. Roeding'mrs. roeding oleander
Classic shrub of the Mediterranean, this one with fabulous and fragrant double flowers in salmon pink. To 4 ft or so with a dense, upright habit in full baking sun and well-drained soil. Drought tolerant, requiring very little summer water, but appreciates an occasional shower. Tolerates coastal conditions as well as urban pollution. Easy. Frost hardy to 15 to 20F, mid to upper USDA zone 8.
Apocynaceae $12 3D

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Olea europaea - 11th Avenue
From a mix of olives planted on Sean's old NE Portland street or at least along side, this has sustained no winter damage over the last 20 years or so. The fruit resembles very much the selection Piqual. To 12' in 5 years and half as wide. Average olive conditions, sun, mineral soil, and drought toward the end of the dry season will increase hardiness. USDA Zone 8a.
Oleaceae $14 4in

Olea europaea 'Frantoio' - Dole 181
Attractive, large, vigorous plant, to 20 ft+; easily kept smaller. Long weeping shoots & medium to large leaves with sage to silver reflective undersides. The late fruit produces some of the best flavored oil. Best in sun in lean, well-drained soil. Supplemental water to establish; withhold in late summer to harden. Hardy to 0ºF, USDA zone 7, if well ripened.
Oleaceae $18 3D

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Olea europaea 'Fruitless Endeavor' fruitless olive
Small olive tree, to only 4-6 ft tall in five years with a rounded form, a size suitable to the small, sunny and dry garden or as a low, evergreen hedge. This was given to us as cuttings from a many-year-old seedling with long, blue-green weeping foliage.Easily trimmed to shape. Grown only for their ornamental value, they do best in full sun and well-drained soil with very little summer water once established. Can also be grown indoors in a sunny location in a pot that drains well with regular water in summer water (allowing for a bit of drying out) and less frequent water in winter. Frost hardy in the ground to 10F, USDA zone 8. Though shared with us and propagated under the name O. europaea 'Fruitless Dwarf', we have given it what we hope is a more interesting moniker.
Oleaceae $14 3D

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Olea europaea 'Grignan'
Ancient Italian cultivar. Self-sterile so requires a friend for fruit production. Sun, well-drained soil and occasional summer water in hot dry places for best fruiting. Quite drought tolerant once well established. For increased hardiness to cold, best to withhold water in the late season for hardening off new growth. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Oleaceae $18 3D

Olearia - white form

Olearia - white formdaisy bush
This is a serious "double-take" plant, an evergreen shrub with silver foliage that is completely covered with white daisy flowers in late spring. To 4 ft tall at maturity with stiff, upright stems and a compact form, these are tough and easy in the garden, tolerating drought and coastal conditions. Best in hot sun with little supplemental water once established. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.
Asteraceae $14 2D

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Olearia 'Henry Travers'

Asteraceae $15 4D

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Olearia hectorii

Asteraceae $16 2D

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Olearia ilicifolia
An absolute favorite of the daisy shrubs this New Zealander makes a shrub 3 to 5ft. evergreen shrub. Silvery bark and narrow, stupendously silver undulating leaves with small harmless spines. These are complimented by the nearly black petioles and young stems, white flowers late spring to mid summer. Reasonably well drained soils not lovers of extended drought, bright light. USDA zone 7b.
$15 4in

Olearia macrodonta var. minor

Olearia macrodonta var. minornew zealand holly
A shrubby daisy-on-a-stick from New Zealand, this one smaller than the species, reaching only 3 ft tall and as wide with soft green, crinkle-textured leaves and corymbs of white flowers in the summer. Like the species, aging bark peels in graceful strips. Full sun is best with well-drained soil and average summer water. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Asteraceae $12 3D

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Olearia x haastii daisy bush
This stiff leaved New Zealand ‘daisy on a stick’ is a handsome addition to your sunny border. A shrub to 4 ft tall x 4 ft wide, easily pruned, with fragrant, long-lasting, white flowers in summer and excellent evergreen leaves. Tolerates coastal conditions and summer drought, though accepts regular water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Asteraceae $16 2D

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Ophiopogon 'Golden Zebra'

Liliaceae / Asparagaceae $12 3D

Ophiopogon japonicus 'Silver Comet'

Ophiopogon japonicus 'Silver Comet'snake beard
Cheerful, evergreen mondo grass with tallish, grassy leaves, to 8" tall or so, green with fine white stripes. Summer flowers are white, echoing the variegation, and followed by blue berries. Spreads slowly by underground rhizomes, making small, bright clumps in part sun with regular summer water. Frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 6.
Liliaceae / Asparagaceae $14 4D

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Ophiopogon planiscapus mondo grass
This small lily relative grows only to about 10" in height, spreading to form luxuriant clumps by underground runners if given plenty of summer moisture. The glossy, evergreen leaves and small lilac flowers make any brightly colored object stand out and look wonderful with your. Full sun to deep shade; a bit slow growing either way. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 6.
Asparagaceae $14 3D

Ophiopogon planiscapus 'Nigrescens'

Ophiopogon planiscapus 'Nigrescens'black mondo grass
In the garden, purple and black have become the new beige, dark colors being the perfect contrast and background for just about anything. This small lily relative grows only to about 6" in height, spreading contentedly if given plenty of moisture. The black, evergreen leaves and small lilac flowers make any brightly colored object stand out and look wonderful with your new Goth look -- white powdered makeup not included. Full sun to deep shade; a bit slow growing either way. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 6.
Liliaceae / Asparagaceae $12 4D

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Ophiopogon planiscapus 'Way Good Variegated'
A Cistus Introduction. Ultra fine selection of mondo grass with olive green leaves evenly pinstriped a creamy white. Vigorous, spreading at least as fast as more common versions in damp soil. Fine in nearly full sun to fairly dense shade with regular summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6.
$14 4in

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Ophiopogon sp.
This evergreen lily relative grows to about 10" in height, a particularly vigorous clone spreading to form luxuriant clumps by underground runners if given plenty of summer moisture. The glossy, leaves and small lilac flowers make any brightly colored object stand out and look wonderful as an evergreen background. Full sun to deep shade. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 6.
Liliaceae / Asparagaceae $012 4in

Opuntia 'Candelaria Flame'

Opuntia 'Candelaria Flame'
A Cistus introduction, from a most variable population in south central Nevada, where these shaggy creatures can vary from gold to white to silver to red. Named for both the nearby small town and the color of its sign, this form of Opuntia erinacea var. ursina 'Candelaria' stood out after an October rain with its brilliant auburn spines, exquisitely back-lit in the autumn sun. Slow to reproduce, adding only a pad or two at a time. These enjoy sharp drainage in full sun avoiding overly saturated winter soil. A very long lasting pot specimen. Frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 5.
Cactaceae $16 3D

Opuntia 'Dark Knight'

Opuntia 'Dark Knight'hedgehog prickly pear
This striking opuntia, a Claude Barr selection, has long white spines on distinctive pads of purple green, becoming more purple in winter cold. Colorful and even more so in late spring to early summer when the bright, lavender-pink flowers with golden stamens first appear. To 10" tall x 4 ft wide in sun and lean, well-drained soil. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $15 2D

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Opuntia 'Golden Globe' prickly pear
A Cistus introduction. From one of our favorite cactus habitats not far north of the aptly named Cactus Mountain Oregon, we believe actually named for particularly large specimens of pediocactus growing on its flanks. This selection from an obviously hybrid colony (parents = Opuntia polyacantha x erinacea var. columbiana) has shaggy upright pads to about 5" creating clumps 8-10" high by 3-4 ft wide with densely petalled flowers of undulating gold yellow, the orange stamens combining to create quite a show. Careful drainage is a must with these cliff dwellers and full sun. More summer drought tolerant than other prickly pears. Probably frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $15 4D

Opuntia 'Sunset'

Opuntia 'Sunset'
A most attractive variegated prickly pear with but few spines and striking green, cream, and yellow stripes on each pad. The plant often tinted orange in sun or with winter frost. To about 3 x 3 feet in as many years. The mexican origin dictates hardiness only to the bottom of zone 9, possibly 8 if super duper dry. Excellent container plant and not particularly water sensitive.
Cactaceae $16 3D

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Opuntia basilaris var. aurea 'Red Rocks'

Cactaceae $15 3D

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Opuntia basilaris var. brachyclada 'Wrightwood'
From a most interesting valley in the eastern San Bernardino mountains of SoCal, this miniature beavertail grows to only about 6" in height by 12" in width. The blue-green stems polka dotted with orange glochids (don't touch), and magenta flowers mid spring. Excellent in containers or a very well drained garden situation. Full sun USDA Zone 5.
Cactaceae $12 4in

Opuntia cacanapa 'Ellisiana'tigertongue, spineless prickly pear
Hurray for this nearly spineless, not-to-prickly, prickly pear with blue-green pads, to 6" in diameter, in clumps to as much as 3 ft tall x 4 ft wide. Late spring flowers are bright yellow. Of probable Mexican origin, found in cultivation in Alpine Texas, these are beautiful, architectural, fast-growing and safe to have around curious children. Loves summer water but can fare well without. Frost hardy into the bottom of USDA zone 7. A plant with many synonyms including O. lindheimeri var. ellisiana and O. cacanapa 'Ellisiana'.
Cactaceae $15 3D

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Opuntia erinacea v. ursina 'White Lightning'
This from an interesting colony of alluvial fans west of Hawthorne NV, where these shaggy plants illuminate for miles when backlit. This all white spined creature grows to about 18" in height to about 2' in width and adorns itself with light yellow flowers in late Spring. Excellent pot plant or outdoors in very well drained soil and a little artificial lightning storm or two, if not naturally occurring. Full sun for best spines. USDA Zone 5 if not colder.
Cactaceae $14 3D

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Opuntia erinacea x 'Pink n' White' - Emory County, UT [TH]
USDA Zone 4, pink flowers
Cactaceae $14 4in

Opuntia fragilis - Michigan tiny form

Opuntia fragilis - Michigan tiny formbrittle pricklypear
This form, from a population in its far northeastern range, indeed Michigan, was found in wind-exposed outcrops or in mats in the mosses and lichens. Each pad is under 1/2" in length and width, often under 1/4", with a slightly blue cap and not many spines. This little prickly pear is best in bright light and quite water tolerant. Has been frost hardy into USDA zone 3. Good container plant for your artic condo.
Cactaceae $11 3D

Opuntia fragilis - Sequim, Washington

Opuntia fragilis - Sequim, Washingtonbrittle pricklypear
From a collection by Ian Barclay near his wonderful nursery in Sequim Washington, this rainshadow population growing on rocks near the Puget Sound might not be the most beautiful form in the world but it certainly is interesting! A rather sparsely spined creature, forming open clumps with occasional light yellow flowers. It is always a surprise to come across a prickly pear west of the Cascades Mountains and these have surprised many a beachcomber taking a break on nearby rocks. Sun for sure. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $12 3D

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Opuntia fragilis 'Alberta Sunset'
A Claude Barr introduction many years ago, this diminutive plant from the northern Great Plains grows only to 4-5" to height forming colonies of dense clumps to 18" in diameter over time. With nearly spineless pads and colors beginning warm yellow and aging through colors of the sunset. Fantastic for the rock garden or a small container. Zone 3
Cactaceae $11 3D

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Opuntia fragilis 'Neon Gold'
A Cistus introduction. Our southern Utah collection of this probable hybrid with fragilis, golden spines, and clumping 4 to 6" in height by 2' across in a couple of years. The most striking feature ,brightly salmon to coral colored pads as they emerge in the spring. Excellent container plant, or rock garden subject, for bright light, well drained soil. USDA zone 4 at least.
Cactaceae $12 3D

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Opuntia fragilis (debreczyi) 'Nearly Famous'
Our collection form SE Utah, this doubtless a love child with O. polyacantha grows to about 6" in height by 3ft. Densly held grey-green pads of only a couple of inches, slightly flattened with short spines a pleasing light straw color. light pink flowers in some abundance mid spring. Full sun with occasional summer water and sharp drainage, easy in rock garden or trough. USDA zone 4 if not colder.
Cactaceae $12 3D

Opuntia fragilis (debreczyi) var. denuda 'Potato'

Opuntia fragilis (debreczyi) var. denuda 'Potato'potato cactus
This variety of the fragile prickly pear from the western Colorado plateau tends to be almost entirely nekkid, not even having the tiny glochids we've come to enjoy. A favorite of rock and trough gardeners, these have round pads, to under 2", that clump to at least 3 ft wide but only a few inches in height, turning purplish in winter and producing occasional lemon-yellow flowers in mid spring. This clone shared with us by Western Colorado's Don Campbell. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA Zone 4, possibly lower.
Cactaceae $12 2D

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Opuntia fragilis th.073 [Salinas Creek] brittle prickly pear
Another find from southern Utah by plantsman Tim Hanis, these small, round, padded clumps, to 4-5" tall and 18" wide, are adorned with cream and white spines and gold glochids. Occasional yellow flowers appear in mid spring. Cute little pot, container, or rock garden creature for full sun. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4, possibly colder.
Cactaceae $11 4D

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Opuntia fragilis x erinacea 'San Juan Grey'
A Cistus Introduction. From a diverse hybrid cluster southeast of Moab UT comes this 6" by 18" mound former, distinctly greenish grey pads adorned with short black and grey spines, warm yellow flowers mid spring. Happy in any well drained soil, including rock garden or container if provided full sun. USDA zone 3.
$14 3D

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Opuntia gilvescens 'Oklahoma Pancake'
As the name implies, from a distance this little prickly pear does indeed look like a stack of pancakes. At most, growing to about 3 feet, with yellow flowers and a halo of small golden spines. Native to the Oklahoma panhandle and environs. Good for garden specimen or a container. For bright light and well drained soil. Zone 4.
Cactaceae $12 4in

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Opuntia humifusa - From Bob Johnston [Missouri] Eastern Prickly Pear

Cactaceae $14 4in

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Opuntia imbricata - Tim's purple Cholla
Though it may never make anyone's list of street trees, this mighty little cholla collected by Tim Hanis, can eventually reach 4-6 ft tall, rounded stem segments, or joints, to 14" long, with numerous pink-red spines. Striking purple flowers appear in late spring to early summer followed by spineless yellow fruit that is edible. These natives of semi-arid areas of the southwest prefer full sun, good drainage, and only occasional summer water. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $14 4D

Opuntia imbricata 'Guadalupe'

Opuntia imbricata 'Guadalupe'chain cholla
A Cistus introduction, our collection from the Guadalupe Mountains, skirting the Texas-New Mexico boarder at about 6500 ft. This a particularly rounded, small tree, to about 6 ft tall, with bright green stems and plum colored flowered, abundant in June and producing yellow fruit. Easy and tolerant of many conditions provided decent drainage. Frost hardy to at least -10F, USDA zone 6, probably zone 5.
Cactaceae $14 3D

Opuntia microdasys - Monstrose form

Opuntia microdasys - Monstrose formbunny ears cactus
This form of the bunnie ears opuntia has been in cultivation for a long time but has never become common. Looks like something from the Flintstones; each lumpy pad is covered with golden spots of tiny glochids, the plant occasionally to about 18” and flowering in golden yellow. Best in well-drained soil where it is dryish outside. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8. Otherwise an excellent container plant.
Cactaceae $15 4in

Opuntia microdasys 'Albuquerque'bunny ears cactus
Another of Sean’s favorite, early childhood succulents, one that still entrances him (until violently shaken) and can only be described as “cute” -- the opuntia that is -- with nearly perfectly round pads dressed in tiny clusters of pale glochids -- which, by the way, are not cute, as they get in ones clothing – and yellow flowers in summer. Though most often grown as a container plant, the species is hardy outdoors in USDA zone 8 or above. This came from a decidedly zone 7 place, an old garden in Albuquerque, NM. Full sun or brightest windowsill for best appearance.
Cactaceae $014 3D

Opuntia polyacantha

Opuntia polyacanthaplains pricklypear
These common natives of western dry lands in have round to oval pads, from 1-4" long with dense spines ("polyacantha" means "many thorns") up to 2" long, and form spreading mats to 4-12" tall and up to several feet wide. Early summer flowers are pale yellow and abundant. Cold hardy to USDA zone 4
Cactaceae $14 4in

Opuntia polyacantha 'Crystal Tide'

Opuntia polyacantha 'Crystal Tide'
This Claude Barr introduction forms dense clumps to 18" tall and spreading to 3 feet. The olive green pads are covered with golden and white spines. Silver pink flowers occur in mid spring. Very good container or landscape plant for well-drained soil and bright light. To zone 3.
Cactaceae $15 3D

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Opuntia polyacantha SBH 9991 - Large White Flowers Plains Prickly pear

Cactaceae $14 2D

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Opuntia polyacantha x erinacea var. columbiana SBH 7524
A Cistus introduction. Our selection/collection from NE Oregon's Imnaha Canyon growing to 18" in height by 3' in width in a short amount of time, with gray green pads adorned with twisted gold and white spines giving it an interestingly shaggy appearance. The semi double 3 to 4" flowers open a warm apricot to yellow, fading on the 2nd day, and centered with bright red stamens. Give excellent drainage, bright light, in container or in the ground, USDA Zone 4.
Cactaceae $14 4in

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Opuntia polyacantha x fragilis - Duchesne, CO

Cactaceae $14 4D

Opuntia potsii var. montana

Opuntia potsii var. montana
A wonderful little cactus from Santa Fe, New Mexico, to only 4" tall x 30" wide, with green pads and very short spines. Summer flowers are lemon yellow, single and simple. Best in lean soil, good drainage, and bright light, though these are more shade tolerant than most opuntias. Needs little to no summer water. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA Zone 4.
Cactaceae $14 3D

Opuntia pusilla - gold spined form

Opuntia pusilla - gold spined formcockspur prickly pear
Diminutive, mat-forming prickly pear from the Gulf Coast to the lower Carolinas, found most often in coastal sand dunes with 2" flattened pads, yellow flowers, and, in this form, golden spines, making a most attractive, fast-growing garden or container plant. Pads easily detach and can be shared purposely or not. Frost hardy in low USDA zone 7, possibly zone 6. Quite moisture tolerant as well.
Cactaceae $14 2D

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Opuntia ramosissima 'Sara's Robust' Cholla
This pretty selection found by Desert Way nursery near phoenix, grows 18" to 2' by about the same, with multiple branches, pink tinted in winter and tipped with a halo of golden spines. This little cholla prefers excellent drainage and bright light, very sculptural container plant as well. USDA Zone 6.
Cactaceae $14 2D

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Opuntia ramosissima 'Semi Freddie' pencil cholla, diamond cholla
A Cistus introduction. This from an area straddling the Arizona/Nevada border, where the forms tend to make 3 to 4' wide, fairly dense clumps of about 18" in height, looking of under sea creatures with but a few small spines atop rose tinted stems. These plants have been subject to much less passive recreation and botanizing, and have been run over a number of times by off-road vehicles......too bad the spines aren't sharper. USDA Zone 6.
Cactaceae $12 2D

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Opuntia sp. SBH 9116b - mini pad
A Cistus introduction. Our collection from San Juan County Utah from a variable hybrid swarm, to only about 6" in height, slowly clumping, with 2" rounded flattened pads of a pleasing gray green, adorned by orange glochids and small gold and gray spines. Excellent trough or container plant given gritty soil and decent drainage. Bright light, USDA Zone 4.
Cactaceae $12 2D

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Opuntia wigginsii 'Silver Spine'

Cactaceae $15 3D

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Oryzopsis hymenoides indian rice grass

Poaceae $12 4in

Oscularia caulescens

Oscularia caulescens
Seriously cute ice plant from South Africa, this one evergreen with succulent, fleshy leaves: light blue-green and somewhat 3-sided with toothed edges on dark stems! What’s not to love? Add the fragrant, deep pink, daisy-like flowers with yellow centers for more fun in spring and summer. Full sun to a bit of shade and good drainage. Drought tolerant but fatter and fuller with regular water. Frost hardy to 15-20F, upper USDA zone 8.
Rubiaceae $11 4in

Osmanthus fragrans var. aurantiacus - Nanjing selection

Osmanthus fragrans var. aurantiacus - Nanjing selectionSweet Olive
Imagine warm ripe apricots on a summer evening, the scent of this ancient and extremely popular, Chinese selection. Evergreen shrub to 12 ft or so. Fall blooming with bright orange, highly scented flowers. Best in sun with normal water, though can tolerate quite a bit of shade. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.
Oleaceae $16 4in

Osmanthus heterophyllus 'Rotundifolius'

Osmanthus heterophyllus 'Rotundifolius'
Slow growing and quite showy evergreen shrub with rounded, shiny, dark green foliage -- a very unlikely sweet olive. White flowers in winter, small but intensely fragrant. Reaches 5 x 5 ft or so at maturity in sun to part shade where the soil is rich and receives regular summer water. Can be used for a low hedge. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.
Oleaceae $16 4in

Osmanthus x fortunei 'Ninth & Polk'

Osmanthus x fortunei 'Ninth & Polk'fortune's osmanthus
Possibly a very mature Osmanthus x ‘San Jose’ but appears to have a more rounded form and much wider leaves,scalloped and gently toothed. Ours are from a plant appearing to be at least 100 years old in Corvallis, Oregon. The lovely form and quite abundant flowers in late October led us to ask permission (yes, really!) for cuttings several years ago. A wonderful creature for small specimen tree to 12-15 ft eventually, or hedging or screen. Drought tolerant once established. Frost hardy in upper zone 7 in bright light to dappled shade.
Oleaceae $16 4in

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Oxalis articulata f. crassipes 'Alba'

Oxalidaceae $12 4D

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Oxalis crassipes 'White Pearl'

Oxalidaceae $9 3D

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Oxalis hirta tropical woodsorrel
Sweet and well-behaved woodsorrel from South Africa, making low mats of bluish green leaves on 5” stems topped, in late fall to early winter, with yellow-centered, rose-pink star flowers, a cheerful addition to a winter day. Easily enjoying a Mediterranean climate, these are drought tolerant, dormant in summer and returning with fall rains. For sun to part shade. Frost hardy in the upper teens F, USDA zone 8b; lower in a protected garden spot. Can also be grown indoors in bright light where they are more floriferous if pot bound.
Oxalidaceae $011 4in

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Pachyphytum hookeri
An adorable, tight-growing succulent, similar to echeveria, that forms a small 4-6" rosette with fat, cylindrical leaves. Leaf color is the lightest blue-green that often appear as if dusted lightly with flour. Excellent in containers where they can be brought inside during the winter months. Full sun is okay, but part is probably sufficient. Slow to offset. USDA zone 9b.
Crassulaceae $12 4in

Paris polyphylla - Heronswood form

Paris polyphylla - Heronswood formmulti-leaf paris
A fabulous plant for the shade garden, a Nepalese trillium relation collected by intrepid plantsman, Dan Hinkley. These have surprising flowers, green sepals in a star shape and thready golden petals, followed by late summer fruit in shades of red-orange. The whorled leaves are handsome and provide a nice statement. To see it is to covet it. For shade and rich soil with summer moisture. Frost hardy to -20F, USDA zone 5.
Melanthiaceae $22 4D

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Passiflora 'Susan Brigham'
Fast-growing passion flower with large deep pink flowers. Plant in full sun to part shade and provide summer water for passionate entertainment. Best to overwinter a cutting or two just in case. Created by Patrick Worley and very similar to 'Donna Brigham.'
Passifloraceae $14 3D

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Passiflora manicata - Venezuela Red passion flower
Vigorous perennial vine from Venezuela. While some P. manicata specimens are native to the cooler cloud forests of South America, this selection can tolerate up to 104F as long as night temps drop 10-20F. Selected by horticulturist Rick McCain from seeds collected by Passiflora botanist Linda Escobar in the 1970s. Have a fence? We've got you covered... er... this guy does. This red and blue Passiflora will consume everything... including your dog, growing 25ft or more every season. Prune in spring as the vine begins to leaf out. Make sure soil is well-draining or somewhat protected. Lots o' sun, lots o' food, lots o' water. Self-fruitful but tastes like corn... and not in a good way. USDA Zone 8b/9a.
Passifloraceae $10 4in

Pelargonium sidoides

Pelargonium sidoides
We wouldn’t care if this small evergreen pelargonium never bloomed, but gosh darn it, its dark maroon/black flowers are fabulous. Silver, velvety foliage is scented to touch. Compact, to about 1' tall and wide. Sun or shade. Occasional summer water. Excellent in pots. Frost hardy to USDA zone 8.
Geraniaceae $14 4in

Pellaea bridgesii [Wallowas]bridges cliff-brake
From plant buddy Greg Tyler, this from granite rock in Oregon's Wallowa Mountains has been a particularly vigorous clumper producing 3 to 4 inch fronds of once divided slightly rolled and very blue fronds atop a thick succulent rhizome. Excellent small rock garden or trough plant occasional summer water in sharp drainage and brightish light for best color. USDA zone 4
Pteridaceae $16 4in

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Penstemon 'Riding HoodTM Red' 18950
Eye-catching beardtongue, a selection of the native Western species, with neon-red blooms atop long, slender stems that, you guessed it, sway delicately in the summer breeze. To 24" tall and 18" wide. Plant in the perennial border and watch them like a good movie. One of the longest blooming Penstemons around, too, from late spring to early fall. Full sun. Well-drained soil. Extremely drought tolerant. Frost hardy to USDA zone 5.
Plantaginaceae $11 4in

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Penstemon davidsonii davidson's penstemon
Low-growing, native, evergreen penstemon, forming a dense mat of small, dark green leaves topped in spring with clusters of tubular, lavender to purple flowers. To only 2-5" tall and spreading easily in lean and well-drained soil in sun to part shade. A wonderful rock or scree garden plant and perfect running over wall. Drought tolerant once established and frost hardy to -20F, USDA zone 6.
Plantaginaceae $9 4in

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Penstemon rupicola

Plantaginaceae $12 4in

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Persicaria microcephala 'Red Dragon' PP 12062 red dragon fleece flower
Colorful perennial with burgundy stems adorned with purple leaves marked with darker chevrons. To 3-4 ft tall x 4-5 ft wide, these are great fillers in the garden or in containers especially in late summer into fall when tiny white flowers dress the stem tips. Well-behaved, these don't spread by runners but may root at tips that touch the ground. Otherwise, rich soil and regular summer water. Frost hardy to -20F, USDA zone 5.
Polygonaceae $14 4D

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Philodendron 'Xanandu'
Luxuriant glossy green foliage is the hallmark of this beauty. Large (12x8 inch) deeply incised leaves with a sturdy midrib give a tropical feel to anywhere they are growing. Fast growing to about 2ft tall spreading up to 4ft. Excellent house plant or summer container plant outdoors. Regular water and rich well drained soil. Full sun to bright indirect light and good drainage. Be sure to transition indoor plants if moving outdoors during summer with shade to begin with. USDA zone 9b.
Arecaceae $18 4in

Phlebodium pseudoaureum

Phlebodium pseudoaureumblue rabbit's foot fern
Once part of a more familiar genus and known as Polypodium areolatum, these ferns are handsome by any name with their evergreen, glaucous gray-blue, deeply lobed fronds to only 12" tall emerging from fuzzy red rhizomes that lie close to the surface. Wonderful in the garden in well-drained, consistently moist soil in part sun to dappled shade. Striking as cut foliage. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Polypodiaceae $16

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Phlomis angustiflolia 'Toob'
Shared with us by UK plantsman Nick Macer, this one of his wild collections, forms a roughly 24'-30" rounded evergreen shrub, with silvery green leaves, folded especially with drought into an almost tube-like structure. The lemon yellow spring flowers complement the foliage beautifully. A with other Mediterranean plants, its best with lean soil, summer drought, bright light. USDA zone 7b.
Lamiaceae $14 4in

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Phlomis angustifolia jerusalum sage
Wooly leaved evergreen shrub - to 4 x 4 ft -- the leaves a soft gray on top and white underneath. Whorls of yellow, drapey, slightly fuzzy flowers -- very cheerful -- on upright stems from spring through summer. Full sun to light shade with little summer water for these natives of Mediterranean Europe. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Lamiaceae $12 4D

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Phlomis fruticosa - compact form
Drought tolerant shrub, with furry, wooly leaves gray-blue on top and lighter and brighter beneath. This form smaller and more compact, to only 2-3 ft tall and wide, but with the same cheerful flowers, whorls of yellow, drapey, slightly fuzzy blossoms, on upright stems from spring through summer. Full sun to light shade with little summer water for these natives of Mediterranean Europe. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Lamiaceae $12 2D

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Phlomis grandiflora - NWRES Garden Jerusalem Sage

Lamiaceae $12 4D

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Phlomis margaritae
A most pleasing evergreen shrub in the Cistus Nursery garden with rounded silver/white leaves to about 3 inches on plants usually about 3 by 3 ft. In spring and occasionally throughout the year, small towers of lavender flowers float like pom poms on upright stalks. Particularly attractive given little summer water full sun and sharp drainage. We prune old seed heads once a year to tidy. This clone from French plantsman Olivier Filippi USDA zone 8a.
Lamiaceae $12 4in

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Phlomis monocephala jerusalem sage
Wooly leaved shrub, from Turkey and very much like its close relative P. fruticosa. To 4 ft tall and wide with pale, blue-green, slight fuzzy leaves that take on a coppery fuzz over time and, in spring to early summer, two-lipped, yellow flowers appear on upright stems. Full sun to light shade and well-drained soil with little summer water for these natives of Mediterranean Europe. Evergreen and frost hardy to 15F, mid USDA zone 8.
Lamiaceae $14 4in

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Phlomis purpurea - white form white jerusalem sage
Medium, sprawling shrub native to Spain, Portugal, and Morocco, to 5-6' tall and wide with wooly, gray-green leaves and crisp white, whorled flowers that sit just atop the foliage throughout the year, with the heaviest bloom in late spring. Best in full sun with well-drained soil, but can adapt to semi-shade areas, too. Requires very little summer watering once established. Frost hardy to upper USDA zone 7. Deer tolerant. Cut back spent flower stems after blooming to encourage more flowers.
Lamiaceae $12 4in

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Phormium 'Yellow Wave' New zealand flax
The broad, arching leaves of this classic New Zealand selection emerge with a wide, creamy yellow central band darkening to a warm gold over the summer. To 3-4 ft tall and wide in full to half sun with regular summer water. Great for a tropical vibe to the garden or large containers. Frost hardy into the upper teens F, upper USDA zone 8, but should be wrapped or lifted when temperatures dip below 18F. Occasional leaves that emerge green should be trimmed away to maintain color.
Xanthorrhoeaceae $16 4in

Phormium cookianum

Phormium cookianummountain flax
Green phormium, lushly green with no stripes or color interruptions on the gracefully arching leaves, to 2.5" wide in clumps to 4-5 ft tall. Stalks of yellow-orange flowers stand above the foliage in late spring/ early summer, followed by fruit in the form of attractive, long, black pods. Good in sun or shade -- in sun with regularly summer water in the inland garden, or shade with lower water requirements as in coastal sun. Not often offered, the are lovely and gracious plants. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8 with mulch for protection against freezing.
Xanthorrhoeaceae $15 4in

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Phormium cookianum 'Blondie' New Zealand Flax
A short-growing, weeping New Zealand Flax with green margins and cream-yellow stripes. Height to 2' and width slightly more. Due to its long slender leaves, this cultivar will often swallow its container by reaching way past the soil level. It's a bit like Rod Stewart's hair. Plant in part to full sun; in hot areas, it may appreciate a location in afternoon shade to avoid leaf burn. Regular summer watering. Protect from hard frost, USDA zone 8b.
Xanthorrhoeaceae $18 4D

Pileostegia viburnoides

Pileostegia viburnoidesclimbing hydrangea
Self-clinging evergreen vine with terminal white flowers in large clusters in late summer to early autumn. Foliage is handsome, the leaves dark green and leathery. For half sun to full shade in fertile, well-drained soil. An excellent candidate to run up that Douglas fir out back, as long as it gets a bit of summer water. (Not recommended on brick as it clings a bit too tightly.) From China and cold hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Hydrangeaceae $12 2D

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Pimelea prostrata new zealand daphne
Spreading, evergreen groundcover, to only a few inches tall and spreading to 2-3 ft wide, slowly forming a mat of tiny, very bright, pale blue leaves with, in summer, clusters of tiny, fragrant, white flowers atop the foliage. A charming plant for spilling over walls or along walkways in full sun to part shade and well-drained soil where roots can be kept cool. Appreciates summer water but tolerates some summer drought once established. Frost hardy to 20F, USDA zone 9, in a protected spot, and possibly lower with good drainage.
Thymelaeaceae $11 2D

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Pitcairnia ringens

Bromeliaceae $18 3D

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Pittosporum divaricatum
This plant, on our lust list for years, is in many ways a typical New Zealand citizen, with tiny, 1/4 inch, narrow, toothed leaves of nearly jet black, providing difficult grazing for beaky animals….all this on a densely upright, divaricating shrub. Eventually to 8 ft or more, but easily kept at 3-4 ft, producing small, dark red flowers and, with age, larger leaves. Striking pot or garden specimen. We suggest planting with silver foliage plants so youngsters don’t get lost or stepped on. Prefers some summer water. Has proven hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Pittosporaceae $14 2D

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Pittosporum eugenoides - South Island collection
Our interior South island New Zealand collection, this 15-18' shrub to small tree with an upright habit. Pleasing evergreen leaves mottled somewhat purple especially in the cool season. Extends the usefulness as hedge or garden specimen into cooler regions than previously grown. Excellent hedge. Plant where passersby can smell the cinnamon scented flowers in late winter or early spring. Water periodically in summer when dry. Full sun to dappled shade, medium to well drained soil. USDA zone 7b.
Pittosporaceae $14 3D

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Pittosporum heterophyllum [Head of House]

Pittosporaceae $14 4in

Pittosporum sahnianum (illicoides)
A hardy pittosporum, the hardiest we know, having withstood winter rigors of -8F, lower USDA zone 6, in North Carolina. And it's handsome, too, an evergreen shrub, to 6-8 ft tall x 4-6 ft wide, with fragrant, pale yellow flowers in spring. Although now placed by some within P. illicioides, we know that our plant, from the JC Raulston Arboretum, is smaller with wider leaves. Summer water in full sun to medium dappled shade and well-drained soil. A pittosporum to enjoy with no worries about weather.
Pittosporaceae $16 4in

Pittosporum tenuifolium

Pittosporum tenuifoliumkohuhu, black matipo
Fabulous unnamed selection of this well behaved, evergreen, New Zealand shrub that can reach 15-20 ft tall x 10-15 ft wide in time. Full to half sun with occasional summer water once established. Shiny, medium green leaves with wavy, undulating edges are held on dark, nearly black stems, with tiny, dark purple, sweetly fragrant flowers adding magic in spring. Excellent hedge or small specimen tree. Fine in coastal sun, enjoying a bit of afternoon shade inland with regular summer water for best appearance. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8, possibly colder.
Pittosporaceae $12 2D

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Argentea Nana'

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Argentea Nana'
Of the often jewel-like members of this highly selected species from New Zealand, P.t. 'Argentea Nana' is indeed one of the most exquisite. Young plants form mounds, 18" to 2 ft , of densely held, 1/4" leaves on black stems. As plants emerge into their adult phase, the leaves grow farther apart and the plants become more open. This too is attractive but if one misses the old days, a little shearing can never hurt. On older plants late spring flowers are under 1/3", maroon to nearly black with the fragrance of dianthus. Dappled shade to full sun with regular summer water preferred. Exquisite container plant. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Pittosporaceae $16 2D

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Victoria'

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Victoria'victoria kohuhu
Another new Pittosporum for us and, we believe, for the United States as a whole, this one having the reputation of one of the most frost hardy in New Zealand. Compact plants with upright dense form, to 6-8 ft, with 1/4", nearly round leaves, splashed pink and silver -- reminiscent of P. tenuifolium ''Silver Magic' but to our eyes darker in color and more compact. Same culture as for others: well-drained soil, bright light, and even summer moisture. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8; possibly 7 with protection.
Pittosporaceae $16 4in

Pittosporum tobira 'Tall n Tough'

Pittosporum tobira 'Tall n Tough'mock orange
The hardiest of P. tobira clones, this selection is from JC Raulston Arboretum has survived temperatures to 0F without blinking. Large, evergreen shrub to small tree, to 8 ft tall x 6 ft wide, has shiny, dark green, rounded leaves and, in early summer, intensely fragrant, citrus-like, white flowers. Appreciates full sun to part shade, with regular summer water until established. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Pittosporaceae $16 2D

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Platycerium veitchii 'Lemoinei' French staghorn fern

Polypodiaceae $018 4in

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Poa astonii

Poaceae $12 4in

Podocarpus lawrencei 'Purple King'

Podocarpus lawrencei 'Purple King'
Spreading shrub to small tree from New Zealand with foliage that turns a very dark purple in winter, lightening a bit in summer. Has very nice red berries. Can be easily hedged, making it a nice alternative to yew or other more commonly used conifers. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 7.
Podocarpaceae $14 4in

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Podocarpus macrophyllus 'Golden Crown'

Podocarpaceae $16 3D

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Podocarpus nivalis UCSC 75.44

$14 3D

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Podocarpus parlatorei - cl 1 [Cistus plant] pine of the mountains
A beautiful and surprisingly hardy Andean podocarp shared with us by Woodlanders Nursery, reaching 15-20' in a reasonable time with a fine scaled, somewhat weeping habit in our garden, the foliage a cheerful green against silvery bark. Evergreen and happy in dappled shade to full sun and fairly well-drained soil with summer water in dry climates. Seems fine as low as USDA zone 8.
Podocarpaceae $18 3D

Podocarpus salignus

Podocarpus salignuswillowleaf podocarp
One of a number of exquisite and rare conifers from southern Chile, this upright, forest dweller with weeping branches and gracefully hanging foliage looks for all the world like the bamboo you always wanted. Particularly beguiling as it grows in several places with the Chilean native Chusquea culeou, a combination we observed during our first collections in Chile some years ago. Nothofagus and luma are other associates in this moist cool maritime environment. Unlike some other rarities, it has become quite at home in cultivation, adding a graceful subtropical effect in our courtyard and having remained undamaged in temperatures in the low teens F in several gardens. A plant for reasonably moist soil and average fertility, bright light to dappled shade (weeps a bit more in dappled shade). Eventually to 25-30 ft, more reasonably to 15 ft in the garden. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Podocarpaceae $16 2D

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Polygonatum biflorum Soloman's seal
A wonderful wildflower, native to the eastern US, with unbranched, upright stems, handsome leaves, and in spring, the great treat -- white flowers dangling down from the arching stems. Spreads by rhizomes to form clusters. To 1-3 ft tall in clumps to 3 ft wide in part shade to full shade with summer water for best appearance. Dies back in winter and returns in all its glory with spring temperatures. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Liliaceae / Asparagaceae $14 4D

Polygonatum kingianum [red flowered form]
Exquisite, upright or clamoring perennial with narrow leaves and red-tinted flowers to 3' or more, spreading to form small colonies. Flowering throughout late spring and summer. Winter deciduous. Dappled shade to full sun in coastal climates. Rich soil with summer moist conditions, hearkening to its Asian origins. Zone 6.
$16 4D

Polygonatum odoratum var. pluriflorum 'Jinguji Form'

Polygonatum odoratum var. pluriflorum 'Jinguji Form'red stem solomon's seal
Upright perennial, a Japanese form of the traditional Solomon's seal, this with red stems that create a sharp contrast with the green leaves and white spring flowers that dangle from the stem followed by black berry-like fruit. Best in dappled to full shade, reaching 20-24" tall in clumps to 2-3 ft wide. Moist, fertile soil is best for beautiful plants standing over a long period. Frost hardy to -30F, at least, USDA zone 4.
Liliaceae / Asparagaceae $15 4D

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Polygonatum odoratum var. pluriflorum 'Jinguji'
Upright perennial, a Japanese form of the traditional Solomon's seal, this with red stems that create a sharp contrast with the green leaves and white spring flowers that dangle from the stem followed by black berry-like fruit. Best in dappled to full shade, reaching 20-24" tall in clumps to 2-3 ft wide. Moist, fertile soil is best for beautiful plants standing over a long period. Frost hardy to -30F, at least, USDA zone 4.
Liliaceae / Asparagaceae $15

Polygonatum verticillatum

Polygonatum verticillatumWhorled Solomon's Seal
Very cool Solomon's Seal known for its arching, narrow, whorled leaves and upright, stately architectural appearance, reminiscent of bamboo or equisetum, white-pink, bell-shaped flowers appearing in late spring that dangle handsomely from the leaf axils, followed by clusters of adorable red fruit in fall. Excellent mass planting among hostas or other large-leaved perennials, or next to large boulders, where they are allowed to shoot up to a majestic 6-7' in height. Part sun is ideal with occasional summer watering to keep from drying out completely. Frost hardy to USDA zone 5.
Liliaceae / Asparagaceae $12 4in

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Polylepis australis

Rosaceae $13 2D

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Polypodium sp. - narrow pinnae

Polypodiaceae $12 4D

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Poncirus trifoliata trifoliage orange
Bitter orange, very architectural with green stems and wicked thorns. Extremely hardy, deciduous citrus, best in winter when the green stems and thorns are exposed and large orange fruits hang on. In spring, there are white flowers with a sweet fragrance. Plant in containers for more drama; in the ground for easiest care. 10 ft in time... a long time. Extremely frost hardy, to USDA zone 5.
Rutaceae $16 3D

Prostanthera lasianthos

Prostanthera lasianthosvictorian christmas bush
Tall and lush evergreen shrub, the largest of the Australian mint bushes, to 15 ft tall x 7-8 ft wide though easily kept smaller, with dark green, slightly toothed leaves, very minty when brushed or crushed. Lovely fat sprays, of white bell-flowers with purple and orange markings hang from the branches in late spring. Best in full to part sun, protected from winds and difficult winter weather, with regular summer water in driest climates at least until well-established. Frost hardy to the mid teens F, USDA zone 8b.
Lamiaceae $11 4in

Prunus ilicifolia

Prunus ilicifoliaholly leaf cherry
A cherry for the dry garden with dark-green, holly like leaves and attractive, white flowers in July followed by late autumn fruit (more pit than cherry). A chaparral plant from Oregon's Siskiyou Mountains and southward, this dense, evergreen shrub or small tree, to 5-10 ft, is an important wildlife habitat and food source. Best in full sun with little summer water. Undamaged into the mid teens F, mid USDA zone 8.
Rosaceae $11 4D

Prunus lusitanica 'Variegata'

Prunus lusitanica 'Variegata'Variegated portuguese laurel
A very useful garden accent and an enduring evergreen in a variegated form, the shiny green foliage splashed cream with pink winter highlights. Reddish purple new shoots add to the excitement. Early summer flowers are white and fragrant, producing red fruit that ripens to black. Slow growing, eventually reaching 12 ft or so, this large shrub can easily be pruned to tree form or used as a hedge. Does well in sun to part shade and prefers regular summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.
Rosaceae $14 4in

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Punica granatum 'Nana Plena' dwarf pomegranate
Dwarf, double-flowered pomegranate, to only 3 ft tall or so, with leaves smaller than the species and small, but spectacular, double flowers. USDA Zone 8a.
Lythraceae $12 3D

Pyrrosia hastata

Pyrrosia hastatafelt fern
An evergreen fern, quite rare in cultivation as it spreads very slowly, but attractive with thick, three lobed leaves, up to 16" long x 6-8" wide, green above and stippled with coppery felt below, on black stems to 6-12” tall and slowly expanding into larger clumps. Found clinging to rocks and tree trunks in China, Japan, and Korea, these are best in part shade to shade in well-drained, even rocky soil with summer water. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8, and into zone 7 with winter protection. Also does well in pots and as an indoor plant.
Polypodiaceae $18 4D

Pyrrosia lingua 'Eboshi' [Contorta]

Pyrrosia lingua 'Eboshi' [Contorta]contorted tongue fern
Intriguing, sloooooow-growing, tongue fern from Japan with evergreen, contorted, (possibly convulsing) fronds, glossy above, pale brown and furry beneath. A plant for a shade rockery or special container. Keep damp. Root hardy in upper USDA zone 7.
Polypodiaceae $16 4in

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Pyrrossia lingua 'Nokogiri-ba' Tongue Fern
This slow growing, undemanding fern has crinkled, leathery fronds presented on slender, darkly colored stalks. Fronds are covered with tan-to rust-colored felt on the undersides. Sun or part shade near the coast, part shade inland, reasonably well drained soil, moderate watering. Useful for containers and shady spots in the open garden. USDA Zone 8.
Polypodiaceae $18 4D

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