Plant Catalog for Mail Order: Spring 2020

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Mahonia eurybracteata 'Cistus Silvers'
Fireworks for the shade! We've been playing around for some time selecting these platinum babies (now seen as M. eurybracteata). To 5' with few branches and rosettes of 2-3' leaves emerging bronze (lots of precious metals here). Easy for dappled shade to full sun in cooler climates, fall and winter flowers of bright yellow blushed.. um.. copper. Occasional summer watering, excellent focal point, USDA zone 7.
Berberidaceae $18 2D

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Mahonia fortunei chinese mahonia
This Chinese mahonia is elegant in its simplicity. Unbranched stems rise 3 to 4 feet with fern-like compound leaves, the leaflets narrow and green above, more yellow below. Clusters of lemony yellow flowers appear in late fall followed by purple black berries. Spreads slowly. Thrives in shade or sun, prefering more sun in colder climates, and prone to mildew in Pacific Northwest shade. Supplemental summer water in dry areas. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8; root hardy in zone 7 with protection.
Berberidaceae $16 2D

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Mahonia sheridaniana 'Roy Lancaster'

Berberidaceae $14 2D

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Malephora crocea

$9 4in

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Mammillaria gracilis thimble cactus
One of Sean’s childhood plants, this is a clustering, small cactus from central Mexico that eventually produces 8” mounds covered with crystalline white spines and, in summer, pinkish flowers. Any brightly lit situation is fine, especially those that dry out a bit in winter. A good small rock garden plant where temperatures remain above 20F, USDA zone 9.
Cactaceae $012 4in

Manfreda undulata 'Chocolate Chip'

Manfreda undulata 'Chocolate Chip'
Brand new and rare cultivar with striking leaves, long and narrow with wavy edges and very densely spotted with ... well, chocolate chips. This form of a Mexican native, selected by Yucca Do Nursery, is small, to 4" tall x 15" wide with leaves about 12" long, and offsets very slowly. Flower spikes can reach up to 3' or more! Prefers good drainage, protection from the afternoon sun in the hottest places, and occasional summer water. Root hardy in USDA zone 8.
Agavaceae $014 4D

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Melianthus villosus

Melianthaceae $12 2D

Metapanax delavayi

Metapanax delavayidelavay false ginseng
A truly elegant, evergreen aralia relative from Southern China, a shrub to 8-10 ft tall and wide, with finely cut, compound leaves and, in maturity, clusters of white flowers in late summer turning to black berries, winter food for the birds. Best in dappled sun to partial shade in rich, moist soil. Our clone, from the University of Washington Arboretum in Seattle, is frost hardy and undamaged in upper USDA zone 7 and possibly lower. (Synonym: Nothopanax delavayi)
Araliaceae $16 2D

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Metrosideros umbellata [Wangaloa] southern rata
This collection from New Zealand's South Island is from one of the colder habitats of one of the most frost hardy of the New Zealand Christmas tree species -- hopefully making these wonderful creatures available to more gardeners. This shrub or small tree grows slowly, eventually reaching 10 or 15 ft or a bit more, with narrow, shiny, bright green leaves and a dense habit, making it a fine garden plant for formality or screen. Mature plants are topped in early summer with bright red, powder puff flowers, magic for bees and hummingbirds. Sun to part shade with regular summer water. As these prefer cooler soils, they are probably not a plant for the US South. We expect these to be fully frost hardy to 15F, mid USDA zone 8, and possibly lower -- let us know. We are very excited to offer this form as we've been looking for hardier southern rata for many years and we think we might have found it.
Myrtaceae $18 2D

Mitraria coccinea - David Mason’s Robust

Mitraria coccinea - David Mason’s Robustchilean mitre flower
South American gesneriad, an evergreen, scrambling shrub or small, interwoven mound with small, dark green leaves and flaming orange-red tubular flowers from late May-July. Requires protection from wind and moist, well-drained soil, rich in humus, in bright light or part shade where roots can remain cool. Easy in USDA zone 9 and tolerates temperatures to 10F, zone 8, in the best locations. Otherwise good in containers with winter protection.
Gesneriaceae $12 4D

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Monardella obispoensis

Lamiaceae $12 2D

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monardella sp. SBH 12298

Lamiaceae $12 3D

Monardella villosa 'Russian River'

Monardella villosa 'Russian River'coyote mint
Native to California, this form was selected by California Flora Nursery from plants found along the Russian River. A tough and vigorous, shrubby perennial, these grow to 1-2 ft tall in clumps to 2 ft wide, with rounded, minty, gray-green leaves on brittle stems. Spring to summer flowers are fragrant, lavendar-pink magnets for hummingbirds and bees. Full sun and well-drained soil are best where summer water is not provided. Said to be deer resistant AND makes a fine tea. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 7.
Lamiaceae $12 2D

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Monardella villosa var. obispoensis San Luis Obispo Coyote Mint
Fuzzy, compact, evergreen perennial with round, gray-green leaves and large, intensely fragrant, lavender flowers relished by butterflies and the occasional hummingbird in spring and summer. Height and width to 18". Shape is largely upright. Excellent plant in heavy, clay soils where drainage is poor. Best in full sun with occasional watering. Excellent in coastal areas. Frost hardy to upper USDA zone 7.
Lamiaceae $9 3D

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Muehlenbeckia axillaris
Often referred to as wire grass, this particularly useful, New Zealand ground cover or container plant grows to only 6" in height, spreading slowly. Dark, wiry stems with shiny, evergreen leaves. Sun to part shade in almost any soil but needing some summer water where particularly dry. Very good around steps or larger specimens such as New Zealand flax. Frost hardy to 8F, upper edge of USDA zone 7.
Polygonaceae $9 3D

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Muehlenbeckia axillaris SBH ? - Steve Newell
low creeping evergreen groundcover
Polygonaceae $9 2D

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Muehlenbeckia complexa 'Texture Big Leaf'
A straightforward cultivar name for a robust form, shared by Texture Plants of Christchurch, New Zealand, collected quite probably from Three Kings Island. The large leaves, on the same dark stems as others in the genus, can exceed 1" in diameter. Forms a vigorous vine, to 10 ft or more, or a formidable ground cover / spiller. Can root along the stems and could be a bit energetic for the small garden. It can definitely be useful in urban spaces, or where good coverage is wanted in sun to part shade. Spreads slowly or not at all away from summer water, a good control in the American west. Though its origins suggest tenderness, all indications suggest frost hardiness to the single digits F, USDA zone 7b. Wonderful hanging basket or container filler.
Polygonaceae $9 3D

Mukdenia rossii

Mukdenia rossii
Ground-covering perennial, a Heuchera relative from China discovered by the late plantsman, Steve Doonan. Slowly clumping, to 1 ft x 1 ft, in well-drained soil with generous water until established. Quite drought tolerant thereafer. Leaves are a bright, shiny green and the white spring flowers make a nice contrast. Sun to part shade. Frost hardy in USDA zone 4.
Saxifragaceae $9 4D

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Myrtus 'Redside'
A Cistus introduction, a hybrid, between Myrtus communis ‘Compacta’ and M. communis ‘Anne McDonald’, showing compact growth, to only about 20” tall, with attractive, red-tinted stems and densely held leaves, also red-tinted on the undersides. Most useful for small hedges, specimens or topiary. Drought tolerant and free flowering in mid to late spring with white, 1/2 “ flowers. Prefers well-drained, lean soil in full sun. Frost hardy in sun to about 15F, mid USDA zone 8.
Myrtaceae $15 3D

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Myrtus communis - upright red
This, a result of our hybridizing over the years, forms a most fragrant shrub to 4-6 ft with red stems and upturned leaves, also tinted red especially in new growth. Charming, white spring flowers lead to blue fruit. Otherwise the same as other Myrtus, loving mineral soil, bright light and tolerating of summer drought. Frost hardy to the bottoms of USDA zone 8.
Myrtaceae $14 2D

Myrtus communis 'Variegata'

Myrtus communis 'Variegata'variegated sweet myrtle
Pretty selection of a popular myrtle, the fragrant leaves, glossy green with creamy white margins, creating a lovely background for the abundant, small, white summer flowers -- also fragrant. A medium sized, bushy shrub, reaching 8-10 ft tall and wide, these are easily trimmed or sheared. Useful as a hedge or specimen in the sunny garden. Drought tolerant once established and frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Myrtaceae $12 3D

Nerine 'After Hours'

Nerine 'After Hours'cape flower, guernsey lily
A lovely amaryllis relative the flowers soft pink with a blue center line and hints of blue throughout, the parents including N. sarniensis, N. bowdenii, and N. pudica. Summer dormant, the flowers emerging "nekked" from September to November; leaves appearing in December and January. Adapted to dry or wet summers provided good drainage and sun. Plant with bulb necks slightly above the ground. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8, with mulch for winter protection.
Amaryllidaceae $14 3D

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Nerine bowdenii cape flower, guernsey lily
Delightful deep pink flowered amaryllis relative from eastern South Africa, adapted to dry or wet summers provided good drainage and sun. Summer dormant; flowers emerge "nekked" in September to November while leaves appear beginning in December and January. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8; a bit colder with mulch.
Amaryllidaceae $12 4D

Nerine filifolia

Nerine filifolia

Amaryllidaceae $12 4in

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Nerine sarniensis var. corusca 'Major'
Shared with us years ago by plantmans Nevin Smith, this robust nerine stands as tall as 18" with 5 or more inch heads of eyecrossing orange flowers that become scarlet tinted with age. Autumn flowering at about the same time the leaves begin to emerge for their winter, as the Mediterranean portion of South Africa. Easy going in cultivation, either in the ground where temperatures don't linger below 20F, USDA zone 9, or in pots that can be pulled into a cool, bright damp place for the winter. In containers, keeping them every so slightly rootbound encourages flowering.
Amaryllidaceae $11 6in

Nerine x pudica 'Strawberry Sorbet'

Nerine x pudica 'Strawberry Sorbet'
Another nerine cross, this between the coral-pink flowered N. sarniensis and the white N. pudica creating a delicious flower in cheery strawberry pink with a white center. As with others in the genus, these are summer dormant, the flowers emerging "nekked" September - November after which the leaves appear in December and January, remaining through spring. Adapted to dry or wet summers provided good drainage and sun. Should be planted with bulb necks slightly above the ground. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8, but may lose leaves in the upper teens F. Add mulch for winter protection.
Amaryllidaceae $14 4D

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Olea europaea 'Skylark Dwarf'
This selection seems to top out at about 6-8 ft. Few fruits since it is self sterile and has somewhat (how do I say this?) distorted anthers. Shrubby and ornamental. Full sun in lean, well-drained soil. Water to establish but withhold in late summer to harden. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Oleaceae $14 2D

Olearia - white form

Olearia - white formdaisy bush
This is a serious "double-take" plant, an evergreen shrub with silver foliage that is completely covered with white daisy flowers in late spring. To 4 ft tall at maturity with stiff, upright stems and a compact form, these are tough and easy in the garden, tolerating drought and coastal conditions. Best in hot sun with little supplemental water once established. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.
Asteraceae $14 2D

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Olearia fimbriata

Asteraceae $15 2D

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Olearia oleifolia 'Waikariensis'
Our cuttings from the New Zealand garden at U of Washington Arboretum. Hardy daisy-on-a-stick to 3 ft tall with gold-infused olive-like leaves. White flowers in summer. Excellent foliage foil. Sun to part shade, regular water and fast good drainage. USDA zone 8.
Asteraceae $15 3D

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Olearia x haastii daisy bush
This stiff leaved New Zealand ‘daisy on a stick’ is a handsome addition to your sunny border. A shrub to 4 ft tall x 4 ft wide, easily pruned, with fragrant, long-lasting, white flowers in summer and excellent evergreen leaves. Tolerates coastal conditions and summer drought, though accepts regular water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Asteraceae $12 3D

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Ophiopogon 'Golden Zebra'

Liliaceae / Asparagaceae $12 3D

Ophiopogon japonicus 'Silver Comet'

Ophiopogon japonicus 'Silver Comet'snake beard
Cheerful, evergreen mondo grass with tallish, grassy leaves, to 8" tall or so, green with fine white stripes. Summer flowers are white, echoing the variegation, and followed by blue berries. Spreads slowly by underground rhizomes, making small, bright clumps in part sun with regular summer water. Frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 6.
Liliaceae / Asparagaceae $14 4D

Opuntia 'Achy Breaky'

Opuntia 'Achy Breaky'
This complex undoubtedly three way hybrid (O. polyacantha x O. erinaceae v. columbiana x O. fragilis) from the mountains of eastern Oregon (where everyone know things get a little wild) grows only to 6" or so in height and about 3 ft wide, sporting white rust and deep brown spines along with chartreuse and yellow, late spring flowers, and provides interest in both texture and compactness. As is true for one of its parents, O. fragilis, the pads easily detach and connect to anyone or thing walking by. Good for sharing with friends; not so great in regions prone to violent shaking. Cactus requirements -- lean soil, good drainage, and little to no summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $14 3D

Opuntia 'Baby Rita'

Opuntia 'Baby Rita'baby rita prickly pear
One of the most beautifully colored forms of the frost hardy cacti, a compact prickly pear to 2 ft, with pads to 3-4" that emerge blue-green often aging to greenish yellow tinted pink -- in this case a natural occurrence that doesn't indicate a lack of fertilizer. Late spring, ruffled flowers add to the palette. A hybrid cross between O. santa-rita and O. basilaris, this has all the charm of O. santa-rita in a much smaller plant. Full sun with sharp drainage. Frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 6. Great in containers.
Cactaceae $16 3D

Opuntia 'Cyclops'

Opuntia 'Cyclops'cyclops prickly pear
Though the name has been around a long time, this plant's origins are unclear We do know this is a cute little prickly pear to 1 ft or 18" in height, probably having O. macrorhiza in its ancestry, with rounded pads of 4-6" forming tight clusters with dark bunches of spines appearing as polka dots from a distance. Cheery yellow flowers appear in mid to late spring. Good for container or sunny garden. And, as one would expect, very drought tolerant though west of the Sierra or Cascades would like a drink from the hose once in a while to spur growth. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $15 4D

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Opuntia 'Golden Globe' prickly pear
A Cistus introduction. From one of our favorite cactus habitats not far north of the aptly named Cactus Mountain Oregon, we believe actually named for particularly large specimens of pediocactus growing on its flanks. This selection from an obviously hybrid colony (parents = Opuntia polyacantha x erinacea var. columbiana) has shaggy upright pads to about 5" creating clumps 8-10" high by 3-4 ft wide with densely petalled flowers of undulating gold yellow, the orange stamens combining to create quite a show. Careful drainage is a must with these cliff dwellers and full sun. More summer drought tolerant than other prickly pears. Probably frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $15 4D

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Opuntia 'Paradox'
From a mini expedition with plantsmen Kelly Grummons and Panayoti Kelaidis, this our selection of a plant bearing very round pads to 5 to 6 inches accross with evenly-spaced golden spines. After clear golden springtime flowers, this selection is known for particularly voluptuous crops of red fruit perfect for prickly pear margaritas. The whole plant to about 10 inches in height by a couple of feet or so. Excellent in rock gardens and containers. full sun, sharp drainage. USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $15 3D

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Opuntia 'Peach Chiffon' prickly pear
A wonderful new strain of prickly pear with a profusion of silky, peach colored flowers in June on very compact plants, to under 6" tall forming clumps to 30” wide. n extremely prickly creature for full sun to light shade in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant but happily accepts occasional water. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $15 3D

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Opuntia basilaris 'Isabella Blue'
A Cistus Introduction: This particularly attractive beavertail with a very light golden pattern of glochids and powdery blue stems comes from a unique spot near Lake Isabella growing among oaks and pines in more typical California oak woodland (rather than in the Mojave Desert). That makes this plant capable of withstanding long periods of summer drought AND a good winter soaking. Strawberry colored flowers in mid spring. To 12-18" in height and 2-3 feet wide (wider if kicked around by cattle as in its native habitat). Careful drainage, bright light. Zone 5.
Cactaceae $15 4D

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Opuntia basilaris ssp. whitneyana SBH 7775a beavertail cactus
Plants from these colonies close to 8700 ft elevation near Mt. Whitney in the eastern Sierra Nevada received some of my first collection numbers during a hike just after high school. This more recent collection from the same area forms a rather dense clump of blue-green pads, to about 4", with neatly spaced, orange glochids and abundant purple-pink flowers in late spring. Has been easy in cultivation though seems to like a well-drained mix whether in the garden or in container, the granite scree in which it grows naturally being a good indicator. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4, or lower.
Cactaceae $15 4D

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Opuntia basilaris var. brachyclada 'Wrightwood'
From a most interesting valley in the eastern San Bernardino mountains of SoCal, this miniature beavertail grows to only about 6" in height by 12" in width. The blue-green stems polka dotted with orange glochids (don't touch), and magenta flowers mid spring. Excellent in containers or a very well drained garden situation. Full sun USDA Zone 5.
Cactaceae $12 4in

Opuntia cacanapa 'Ellisiana'tigertongue, spineless prickly pear
Hurray for this nearly spineless, not-to-prickly, prickly pear with blue-green pads, to 6" in diameter, in clumps to as much as 3 ft tall x 4 ft wide. Late spring flowers are bright yellow. Of probable Mexican origin, found in cultivation in Alpine Texas, these are beautiful, architectural, fast-growing and safe to have around curious children. Loves summer water but can fare well without. Frost hardy into the bottom of USDA zone 7. A plant with many synonyms including O. lindheimeri var. ellisiana and O. cacanapa 'Ellisiana'.
Cactaceae $15 4D

Opuntia echinocarpa SBH 7777

Opuntia echinocarpa SBH 7777wiggin's cholla
A Cistus introduction. This collection originally made in 1981 from the eastern Sierra Nevada at the base of Mt. Whitney is of compact form, making a small "tree" cholla adorned with golden spines and greenish flowers mid spring. This one likes particularly well drained soils and is excellent in containers with bright light, especially where it can be back lit. USDA Zone 5 if not colder.
Cactaceae $14 2D

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Opuntia erinacea x 'Pink n' White' - Emory County, UT [TH]
USDA Zone 4, pink flowers
Cactaceae $14 4in

Opuntia fragilis - Sequim, Washington

Opuntia fragilis - Sequim, Washingtonbrittle pricklypear
From a collection by Ian Barclay near his wonderful nursery in Sequim Washington, this rainshadow population growing on rocks near the Puget Sound might not be the most beautiful form in the world but it certainly is interesting! A rather sparsely spined creature, forming open clumps with occasional light yellow flowers. It is always a surprise to come across a prickly pear west of the Cascades Mountains and these have surprised many a beachcomber taking a break on nearby rocks. Sun for sure. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $12 3D

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Opuntia fragilis 'Neon Gold'
A Cistus introduction. Our southern Utah collection of this probable hybrid with fragilis, golden spines, and clumping 4 to 6" in height by 2' across in a couple of years. The most striking feature ,brightly salmon to coral colored pads as they emerge in the spring. Excellent container plant, or rock garden subject, for bright light, well drained soil. USDA zone 4 at least.
Cactaceae $12 3D

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Opuntia fragilis 'Red N Black'
Very nice version of our native Opuntia, this with striking red and black spines growing to 4-6" tall by 3 ft wide and showing off yellow flowers in late spring. Handsome in the sunny well-drained garden, with occasional, monsoon-like summer water for best appearance. Frost hardy in USDA zone 3.
Cactaceae $12 2D

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Opuntia fragilis (debreczyi) 'Nearly Famous'

Cactaceae $12 3D

Opuntia fragilis (debreczyi) var. denuda 'Potato'

Opuntia fragilis (debreczyi) var. denuda 'Potato'potato cactus
This variety of the fragile prickly pear from the western Colorado plateau tends to be almost entirely nekkid, not even having the tiny glochids we've come to enjoy. A favorite of rock and trough gardeners, these have round pads, to under 2", that clump to at least 3 ft wide but only a few inches in height, turning purplish in winter and producing occasional lemon-yellow flowers in mid spring. This clone shared with us by Western Colorado's Don Campbell. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA Zone 4, possibly lower.
Cactaceae $12 2D

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Opuntia fragilis th.073 [Salinas Creek] brittle prickly pear
Another find from southern Utah by plantsman Tim Hanis, these small, round, padded clumps, to 4-5" tall and 18" wide, are adorned with cream and white spines and gold glochids. Occasional yellow flowers appear in mid spring. Cute little pot, container, or rock garden creature for full sun. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4, possibly colder.
Cactaceae $11 4D

Opuntia fragilis x 'Duchesne Red'
This probable hybrid from the county of the same name, has chubby little pads about 1 by 2", forming 8 to 10" compact clusters with gray and black spines, prominant red glouchids and light yellow flowers. Easy to grow if given bright light and summer moisture along with well drained soil, excellent in containers. USDA zone 4 at least.
Cactaceae $12 4in

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Opuntia fragilis x erinacea 'San Juan Grey'
A Cistus Introduction. From a diverse hybrid cluster southeast of Moab UT comes this 6" by 18" mound former, distinctly greenish grey pads adorned with short black and grey spines, warm yellow flowers mid spring. Happy in any well drained soil, including rock garden or container if provided full sun. USDA zone 3.
$14 3D

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Opuntia imbricata - Tim's purple

Cactaceae $14 4D

Opuntia imbricata 'Guadalupe'

Opuntia imbricata 'Guadalupe'chain cholla
A Cistus introduction, our collection from the Guadalupe Mountains, skirting the Texas-New Mexico boarder at about 6500 ft. This a particularly rounded, small tree, to about 6 ft tall, with bright green stems and plum colored flowered, abundant in June and producing yellow fruit. Easy and tolerant of many conditions provided decent drainage. Frost hardy to at least -10F, USDA zone 6, probably zone 5.
Cactaceae $14 3D

Opuntia microdasys - Monstrose form

Opuntia microdasys - Monstrose formbunny ears cactus
This form of the bunnie ears opuntia has been in cultivation for a long time but has never become common. Looks like something from the Flintstones; each lumpy pad is covered with golden spots of tiny glochids, the plant occasionally to about 18” and flowering in golden yellow. Best in well-drained soil where it is dryish outside. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8. Otherwise an excellent container plant.
Cactaceae $15 4in

Opuntia microdasys 'Albuquerque'

Opuntia microdasys 'Albuquerque'
Given to us long ago and found in an old Albuquerque garden in a rather chilly climate where the species often comes to winter...These bunny's ears grow to about 18" tall and spreading to 3' or more over time. The polka dot yellow pattern of the glochids is attractive... Beware though - their soft appearance is misleading as those glochids can be annoying if brushed. Small yellow flowers in mid spring. Zone 7 with good drainage. A good container specimen.
Cactaceae $12 3D

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Opuntia phaeacantha 'Little Millard'
A Cistus introduction. One of the best opuntias for fruit, shared with us by keen-eyed plantsman Tim Hanis. This low grower, to only about 12-18" but spreading to 4-5' has bluish pads, rusty spines, yellow flowers with a hint of orange, and abundant dark red fruit from mid-summer through autumn. Beautiful in the garden, even if you don't make jelly. Full sun, reasonably well-drained soil, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $15 3D

Opuntia polyacantha

Opuntia polyacanthaplains pricklypear
These common natives of western dry lands in have round to oval pads, from 1-4" long with dense spines ("polyacantha" means "many thorns") up to 2" long, and form spreading mats to 4-12" tall and up to several feet wide. Early summer flowers are pale yellow and abundant. Cold hardy to USDA zone 4
Cactaceae $14 4in

Opuntia polyacantha 'Crystal Tide'

Opuntia polyacantha 'Crystal Tide'
This Claude Barr introduction forms dense clumps to 18" tall and spreading to 3 feet. The olive green pads are covered with golden and white spines. Silver pink flowers occur in mid spring. Very good container or landscape plant for well-drained soil and bright light. To zone 3.
Cactaceae $15 3D

Opuntia polyacantha 'Imnaha Blue'

Opuntia polyacantha 'Imnaha Blue'
A Cistus introduction. A common native of western dry lands, this clone, from northeastern Oregon's Imnaha Canyon, was found weeping several feet off a cliff of red ryolite, the nearly spineless, gray-blue pads appearing almost as if hanging in chains. Assuming not everyone has a cliff, these will form spreading mats to 4-12" tall and up to several feet wide. Early summer flowers are a warm, soft yellow. Ordinary cactus requirements -- sun, lean and well-drained soil, and little or no summer water. Undoubtedly frost hardy into USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $14 3D

Opuntia polyacantha SBH 7505b

Opuntia polyacantha SBH 7505b
A Cistus introduction and a vigorous plant, growing to 15-18" tall x about 3 ft wide, with shaggy white to straw colored spines completely obscuring the pads. In mid to late spring saturated yellow flowers appear, each aging tangerine in time, giving a bi-colored effect. Seems to flower best when allowed to grow as it pleases, so be lenient. Needs full sun, good drainage. Good in rock gardens, troughs, or containers. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $14 4D

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Opuntia polyacantha var. utahensis 'Pioche'
A Cistus introduction. Named for the small mining town in Eastern Nevada, this little stunner grows to about 12" in height and 2 to 3' in width in but a few years. The spines on this plant are a warm gold, and very dense, providing a great display, especially when back lit. The flowers are a satiny raspberry in color, usually in May. Easy care, if provided bright light, good drainage, and not soggy conditions in Winter. Excellent container plant, USDA Zone 4.
cactaceae $15 4D

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Opuntia polyacantha x erinacea var. columbiana SBH 7524
A Cistus introduction. Our selection/collection from NE Oregon's Imnaha Canyon growing to 18" in height by 3' in width in a short amount of time, with gray green pads adorned with twisted gold and white spines giving it an interestingly shaggy appearance. The semi double 3 to 4" flowers open a warm apricot to yellow, fading on the 2nd day, and centered with bright red stamens. Give excellent drainage, bright light, in container or in the ground, USDA Zone 4.
Cactaceae $14 4in

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Opuntia polycantha x 'Grey Ghost'
A Cistus introduction, this from the lower reaches of Northeastern Oregon Imnaha Canyon where several opuntia species merge. To 18" by 3' clumps of blue-grey pads adorned with white spines and warm yellow flowers in mid Spring. Excellent in containers or rock gardens especially where spines can be backlit. Full sun, sharp drainage, USDA Zone 5 if not lower.
$15 4in

Opuntia pusilla - gold spined form

Opuntia pusilla - gold spined formcockspur prickly pear
Diminutive, mat-forming prickly pear from the Gulf Coast to the lower Carolinas, found most often in coastal sand dunes with 2" flattened pads, yellow flowers, and, in this form, golden spines, making a most attractive, fast-growing garden or container plant. Pads easily detach and can be shared purposely or not. Frost hardy in low USDA zone 7, possibly zone 6. Quite moisture tolerant as well.
Cactaceae $14 2D

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Opuntia ramosissima 'Sara's Robust'
This pretty selection found by Desert Way nursery near phoenix, grows 18" to 2' by about the same, with multiple branches, pink tinted in winter and tipped with a halo of golden spines. This little cholla prefers excellent drainage and bright light, very sculptural container plant as well. USDA Zone 6.
Cactaceae $9 2D

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Opuntia ramosissima 'Semi Freddie' pencil cholla, diamond cholla
A Cistus introduction. This from an area straddling the Arizona/Nevada border, where the forms tend to make 3 to 4' wide, fairly dense clumps of about 18" in height, looking of under sea creatures with but a few small spines atop rose tinted stems. These plants have been subject to much less passive recreation and botanizing, and have been run over a number of times by off-road vehicles......too bad the spines aren't sharper. USDA Zone 6.
Cactaceae $12 2D

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Opuntia sp. SBH 9116b - mini pad
A Cistus introduction. Our collection from San Juan County Utah from a variable hybrid swarm, to only about 6" in height, slowly clumping, with 2" rounded flattened pads of a pleasing gray green, adorned by orange glochids and small gold and gray spines. Excellent trough or container plant given gritty soil and decent drainage. Bright light, USDA Zone 4.
Cactaceae $12 3D

Opuntia spinosior - highest elevation form

Opuntia spinosior - highest elevation formcane cholla
Classic and most attractive cholla, from elevations over 8100 ft in southeastern Arizona's Pinaleño mountains, with tightly held, silver-tinted-pink spines on rounded branches and cherry red flowers in late spring on “shrubs” to about 4 ft -- the entire plant a luscious purple in the colder months of winter with the branchlets handing downward. A beautiful contrast to the greeny yellow fruit. Full sun, good drainage, and, where dry, occasional summer water to boost growth. Frost hardy to -20F, zone 5, possibly a bit lower.
Cactaceae $14 4D

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Oxalis articulata f. crassipes 'Alba'

Oxalidaceae $12 4D

Parahebe catarractae - blue form

Parahebe catarractae - blue form
Versatile hebe relative, a shrubby, multi-stemmed, perennial with medium green foliage and purple-blue flowers in late summer. Can be sheared after blooming to lengthen bloom time. Usually remains under 3 ft tall. Sun to part shade in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant once established but accepts summer water. Useful as a groundcover in dry places, a low border, or in containers. Evergreen in USDA zone 9 and frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Plantaginaceae $9 2D

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Parahebe olsenii gypsyweed
One of the tiniest and most unusual of the parahebes with leaves of under 1/4” densely held on mats of no more than 4 or 5“ in height. Little clusters of light blue flowers adorn this off and on for much of the year, especially in spring. This is an evergreen “steppable,” particularly nice for small border edges or between pavers and is more durable and less easily crowded out than thyme and its kin; but would like more regular summer water. Sun to dappled shade with reasonable drainage. Not fussy about fertilizer. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Plantaginaceae $009 2D

Parahebe perfoliata

Parahebe perfoliata
Light purple pendant bells all summer carried above handsome grey-green foliage. Tough and dependable in the perennial border or draping over a wall. Sun to part shade, regular water.
Plantaginaceae $12 3D

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Penstemon 10095

Plantaginaceae $14 2D

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Penstemon serrulatus cascades penstemon
Unusual and hard to find, this stunning, native perennial penstemon has gorgeous purple-blue flowers in mid-summer standing on 30" stems above rosettes of green, with lance-shaped foliage. Found in open with good drainage in sun to part shade and tolerates some summer water though drought tolerant once established. Lovely herbaceous groundcover, frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 6.
Plantaginaceae $9 4in

Persicaria 'Brushstrokes'

Persicaria 'Brushstrokes'brushstrokes fleece flower
New and handsome persicaria, more upright than some, to 2 ft tall in sun and 3 ft in shade, with striking, velvety green leaves, and, in late fall, spikes of tiny red flowers, late enough to minimize reseeding. Perennial, dying back each winter. Enjoys average soil in sun to part shade with some summer water. Frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 6. Said to be deer resistant.
Polygonaceae $9 3D

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Persicaria microcephala 'Red Dragon' PP 12062 red dragon fleece flower
Colorful perennial with burgundy stems adorned with purple leaves marked with darker chevrons. To 3-4 ft tall x 4-5 ft wide, these are great fillers in the garden or in containers especially in late summer into fall when tiny white flowers dress the stem tips. Well-behaved, these don't spread by runners but may root at tips that touch the ground. Otherwise, rich soil and regular summer water. Frost hardy to -20F, USDA zone 5.
Polygonaceae $14 4D

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Philadelphus lewisii Lewis' mock orange

Hydrangeaceae $12 3D

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Philadelphus madrensis desert mountain mock orange
Sweet little mock orange, native to the US Southwest and extremely drought tolerant, with highly fragrant, small white flowers, sometimes rose-centered, and small leaves, to only 1/2". A deciduous shrub, to 4 ft tall, for bright light and lean, well-drained soil. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7 and possibly into upper zone 6.
Hydrangeaceae $014 3D

Philadelphus mexicanus 'Rosemary Brown'

Philadelphus mexicanus 'Rosemary Brown'
A Cistus introduction from a wild collection in the highlands of northeastern Mexico. Evergreen, silvery arching shrub to 4 ft weighted down with squared, pure white, intensely fragrant flowers displayed upright & overlapping. Very desirable. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.
Hydrangeaceae $14 3D

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Philadelphus microphyllus

Hydrangeaceae $14 2D

Philadelphus microphyllus 'Desert Snow'
This diminutive, western native was selected by Nevin Smith from seed collected desert traveller Sally Walker. and shared with us by Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Gardens, one of the best native gardens anywhere. This small shrub -- to about 4', maybe a little taller. though as RSABG they have remained under 2' -- has 1", pointed leaves with darkened stems and 1" clusters of very fragrant, densely held, white flowers, larger than the typical species, from mid spring to early summer. Tolerant of great drought but responds to garden water. A plant that should be much used in dry areas of the West. Full to part sun. USDA zone 6, maybe even 5.
Hydrangeaceae $15 2D

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Phlomis 'Sunningdale Gold' jerusalem sage
Always interested in fuzzy plants, we are captivated by the warm, golden indumentum that covers leaf and stem of this evergreen shrublet. Shared with us by British plantsman John Grimshaw, it is our new favorite phlomis. Early summer brings cheerful yellow and fuzzy flowers that lead to fuzzy seed capsules in summer and autumn. To about 3 ft tall with a broad pyramidal growth habit. Perfect for the Mediterranean border in any spot with sun, well-drained soil and limited summer water. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Lamiaceae $14 2D

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Phlomis anatolica 'Lloyd's Variety' Jerusalem Sage
Rugged and useful shrubby perennial with fuzzy stems and on velvety light green, almost gray, leaves. Evergreen. Blooms on this selection are brighter, a flag-yellow, and lightly fragrant reminiscent of cloves. Indeed, all of the Jerusalem sages are proven in dry, sunny spaces and on hot, exposed slopes where other plants suffer from winds and drought. Height 3-4' and width often more (give them space), creating a soft, mounding appearance. Well-drained soil and light summer watering. Frost hardy to USDA zone 7.
Lamiaceae $12 3D

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Phlomis fruticosa - compact form
Drought tolerant shrub, with furry, wooly leaves gray-blue on top and lighter and brighter beneath. This form smaller and more compact, to only 2-3 ft tall and wide, but with the same cheerful flowers, whorls of yellow, drapey, slightly fuzzy blossoms, on upright stems from spring through summer. Full sun to light shade with little summer water for these natives of Mediterranean Europe. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Lamiaceae $12 3D

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Phormium cookianum 'Blondie' New Zealand Flax
A short-growing, weeping New Zealand Flax with green margins and cream-yellow stripes. Height to 2' and width slightly more. Due to its long slender leaves, this cultivar will often swallow its container by reaching way past the soil level. It's a bit like Rod Stewart's hair. Plant in part to full sun; in hot areas, it may appreciate a location in afternoon shade to avoid leaf burn. Regular summer watering. Protect from hard frost, USDA zone 8b.
Xanthorrhoeaceae $18 4D

Pileostegia viburnoides

Pileostegia viburnoidesclimbing hydrangea
Self-clinging evergreen vine with terminal white flowers in large clusters in late summer to early autumn. Foliage is handsome, the leaves dark green and leathery. For half sun to full shade in fertile, well-drained soil. An excellent candidate to run up that Douglas fir out back, as long as it gets a bit of summer water. (Not recommended on brick as it clings a bit too tightly.) From China and cold hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Hydrangeaceae $12 2D

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Pimelea prostrata new zealand daphne
Spreading, evergreen groundcover, to only a few inches tall and spreading to 2-3 ft wide, slowly forming a mat of tiny, very bright, pale blue leaves with, in summer, clusters of tiny, fragrant, white flowers atop the foliage. A charming plant for spilling over walls or along walkways in full sun to part shade and well-drained soil where roots can be kept cool. Appreciates summer water but tolerates some summer drought once established. Frost hardy to 20F, USDA zone 9, in a protected spot, and possibly lower with good drainage.
Thymelaeaceae $11 2D

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Pittosporum divaricatum
This plant, on our lust list for years, is in many ways a typical New Zealand citizen, with tiny, 1/4 inch, narrow, toothed leaves of nearly jet black, providing difficult grazing for beaky animals….all this on a densely upright, divaricating shrub. Eventually to 8 ft or more, but easily kept at 3-4 ft, producing small, dark red flowers and, with age, larger leaves. Striking pot or garden specimen. We suggest planting with silver foliage plants so youngsters don’t get lost or stepped on. Prefers some summer water. Has proven hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Pittosporaceae $14 2D

Pittosporum heterophyllum

Pittosporum heterophyllumchinese mock orange
This evergreen "mock orange" should be in every shopping center parking lot– it’s that tough. Sadly, it’s not well represented anywhere. Medium shrub to small tree,12 to 15 ft, with glossy, narrow foliage and, in spring, pale yellow, intoxicatingly scented flowers. Delicious! Sun to part shade with regular water. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 7.
Pittosporaceae $14 2D

Pittosporum heterophyllum 'Winter Frost'

Pittosporum heterophyllum 'Winter Frost'variegated chinese mock orange
One of the most frost hardy of the Chinese mock oranges, this form, introduced only a few years ago from Japan, grows to 4 ft or so with 2” leaves margined and streaked most attractively in white and cream. Creamy flowers are scented of orange blossoms in mid spring to early summer. Can be shorn as hedge or used as specimen plants in decently drained soil. Prefers sun to half shade and supplemental summer water where very dry. Easy. Frost hardy to 5F, mid USDA zone 7.
Pittosporaceae $14 3D

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Pittosporum illiciodes 'Fine Green'
Another selection by Sean Hogan from Taiwanese collections by Dan Hinkley - P. illicioides DJHT 99079, this one chosen for its denser form, to only 5 ft or so, and ever-so-slightly smaller, narrow leaves that present a fine texture in the garden. An evergreen shrub with the same fragrant, white flowers in spring and, in autumn, very small, blue-black fruit in orange capsules. Best in light shade with regular summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 and expected in zone 7.
Pittosporaceae $16 3D

Pittosporum illicioides 'Strappy'

Pittosporum illicioides 'Strappy'
Too rare in horiticulture. Selected by Sean Hogan from Taiwanese collections by Dan Hinkley - P. illicioides DJHT 99079, chosen for the extremely narrow leaves that present a fine texture in the garden. A tall, evergreen shrub, to 12-15 ft, with fragrant, white flowers in spring and, in autumn, very small, blue-black fruit in orange capsules. Best in light shade with regular summer water. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8, and expected in zone 7.
Pittosporaceae $16 3D

Pittosporum parvilimbum

Pittosporum parvilimbum
A Pittosporum for USDA zone 7! one known to have survived many harsh winters at the JC Raulston Arboretum in North Carolina. Having been introduced there as the completely unrelated Phillyrea, it was only after many years the plant was noticed and properly identified as this recently described and excellent species. From China, a tall, evergreen shrub, to 10-12 ft, densely branched and adorned with small, narrow leaves. Blooms in spring with small, white fragrant flowers followed by tiny, black fruits in orange capsules. Sun to part shade with regular water. A treasure for the Pittosporum-lover’s garden!
Pittosporaceae $16 2D

Pittosporum patulum

Pittosporum patulum
A most unusual member of the genus from New Zealand southern South Island, endemic to only a couple of spots along the Bellcloutha River. Growth is narrow and upright to 8-15' with black, spidery leaves in youth, enlarging only somewhat in adulthood, with more rounded bright green leaves and a multitude of deep maroon flowers said to be the most fragrant of the genus, reminiscent of carnations. This should make a fine new addition to the garden, especially the Goth garden. We have surmised hardiness to zone 8 that has been verified by surviving 12F in winter 2014 in the garden of our super friend Loree, where she and the plant survived the winter unscathed.
Pittosporaceae $14 2D

Pittosporum tenuifolium

Pittosporum tenuifoliumkohuhu, black matipo
Fabulous unnamed selection of this well behaved, evergreen, New Zealand shrub that can reach 15-20 ft tall x 10-15 ft wide in time. Full to half sun with occasional summer water. once established. Shiny, medium green leaves with wavy, undulating edges are held on dark, nearly black stems, with tiny, dark purple, sweetly fragrant flowers adding magic in spring. Makes a love hedge, easily trimmed to size. Fine in coastal sun, enjoying a bit of afternoon shade inland with regular summer water for best appearance. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Pittosporaceae $12 2D

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Argentea Nana'

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Argentea Nana'
Of the often jewel-like members of this highly selected species from New Zealand, P.t. 'Argentea Nana' is indeed one of the most exquisite. Young plants form mounds, 18" to 2 ft , of densely held, 1/4" leaves on black stems. As plants emerge into their adult phase, the leaves grow farther apart and the plants become more open. This too is attractive but if one misses the old days, a little shearing can never hurt. On older plants late spring flowers are under 1/3", maroon to nearly black with the fragrance of dianthus. Dappled shade to full sun with regular summer water preferred. Exquisite container plant. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Pittosporaceae $16 2D

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Atropurpureum'

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Atropurpureum'purple kohuhu
Though doubtless many purple-leaved forms have been introduced under the name Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Atropurpureum', this one is ours, grown from cuttings of the lovely 12 ft tall x 4 ft wide specimen in the garden of Western Hills Nursery in Northern California. The 1", rounded leaves, yes purple and held among black stems, and carnation-scented, nearly black flowers, might possibly sound morbid but are, in fact, dazzlingly beautiful. Plants, easily kept as a formal element or background hedge in the garden, are easily shorn to maintain even tighter shape. Prefers bright light or only dappled shade with regular summer water in dry climates. This has proven to be one of the frost hardiest cultivars, surviving 7F briefly in the garden at Western Hills in 1990 and having turned not a leaf with a windy 20F in our garden. Frost hardy to at least 10F, USDA zone 8; a container plant or an experiment in zone 7.
Pittosporaceae $16 4D

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Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Ebony Giant'
Visually striking and very difficult to find pittosporum cultivar with curly, deep purple-black leaves and a taller growth habit. New growth emerges light green, for a nice contrasting effect. Height to at least 15' and width of 4-6'. Evergreen. Moderate to fast grower, especially with added fertilizer. Excellent against walls or planted as a tall hedge. Frost hardy to USDA zone 8.
Pittosporaceae $15 2D

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Elizabeth'

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Elizabeth'
A southern hemisphere pittosporum from New Zealand, this is a vigorous male cultivar. Small, nearly black flowers provide deliciously fragrant inspiration in spring and the shiny, wavy edged, light blue-green leaves -- variegated with white edges, pink flushed especially in winter -- contrasting with purplish stems provide a nice texture year round. A large shrub to small tree, possibly to 25 ft, but more probably remaining 10-12 ft x 6-8 ft, it can be easily trimmed as a hedge. Enjoying regular summer water, they are best in well-drained soil in sun or part shade, perhaps with extra protection of a south wall or overstory where temperatures dip into the teens regularly. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8, with good protection.
Pittosporaceae $14 2D

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Grey Ghost'

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Grey Ghost'kohuhu
New on the scene, this plant, shared with us by plantsman Luen Miller, has all the terrific attributes of the species and, even better, a very narrow profile, to about 3-4 ft wide to 10 ft or more without pruning. Leaves are narrow and silvery gray (grey…) and early spring flowers are tiny, nearly black bells that look enchanting amonst the silvery foliage. A very nice specimen and a good addition to the hedge or privacy screen possibilities. Bright light for best color and occasional summer water where dry. Also makes a very good pot specimen. Frost hardy to 15F, mid USDA zone 8.
Pittosporaceae $14 2D

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'James Stirling'

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'James Stirling'silver kohuhu
One of the parents of the ever-popular Pittosporum tenuifolium ‘Silver Sheen’, 'James Stirling' is also appealing with a much more platinum coloration and a denser habit. Tiny black flowers in spring come and go quickly but are a sweet surprise and lovely against the silvery foliage. Happy in full to part sun with regular summer water, James will get to 10 ft tall or so and half as wide. Can be pruned to increase density and maintain shape. One of the hardier forms, accepting temperatures in the single digits, upper USDA zone 7.
Pittosporaceae $16 2D

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Nutty Leprechaun'

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Nutty Leprechaun'dwarf purple kohuhu
This selection originated in Ireland though its parentage is, of course, from New Zealand. A good addition to the purple-leaved pittosporums, growing only to about 3 ft tall with small, deep burgundy leaves, under 1/2”, a striking contrast with the florescent chartreuse of the new spring growth. These are not only compact, they have an almost creeping quality, separating P. t. ‘Nutty Leprechaun’ from other small, purple cultivars. Also one of the tougher of the purple group, these have been frost hardy so far into the low teens F with no noticeable damage. Full sun for best color. At home on the West Coast of North America, but not happy in the hot, humid southeast. Frost hardy in lower USDA zone 8.
Pittosporaceae $16 2D

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Silver Ruffles'

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Silver Ruffles'ruffled kohuhu
Small, gray-green, wavy leaves float above black stems on this delicately textured shrub, possibly reaching 12 ft in time. Tiny black flowers appear in spring, stunning against the foliage and highly fragrant as well. Best when backed by darker foliage. Site out of wind and close to a path to be admired. Sun to part sun in hottest climates with some summer water. Frost hardy to at least 10F, USDA zone 8.
Pittosporaceae $16 2D

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Tandarra Gold'

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Tandarra Gold'
A most refined P. tenuifolium, said to be a sport of P. tenuifolium ‘Silver Sheen’ with its ever-so slightly silver tinted leaves. Most importantly though, leaves of under 1/2” carry the same silvery coloring, in this form a yellow blotch takes up nearly the whole leaf, creating a wonderful color contrast with the typical black stems. Without pruning, becomes upright to 8-10 ft or more with an almost cloudlike texture … yellow clouds, of course. Provide summer water and, for the most dainty appearance, keep out of the hottest afternoon sun. Makes a suburb pot plant, luckily for, alas, it is one of the more tender with possible damage in the upper teens F, upper USDA zone 8. Otherwise easy care.
Pittosporaceae $15 2D

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Victoria'

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Victoria'victoria kohuhu
Another new Pittosporum for us and, we believe, for the United States as a whole, this one having the reputation of one of the most frost hardy in New Zealand. Compact plants with upright dense form, to 6-8 ft, with 1/4", nearly round leaves, splashed pink and silver -- reminiscent of P. tenuifolium ''Silver Magic' but to our eyes darker in color and more compact. Same culture as for others: well-drained soil, bright light, and even summer moisture. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8; possibly 7 with protection.
Pittosporaceae $16 3D

Pittosporum tobira 'Tall n Tough'

Pittosporum tobira 'Tall n Tough'mock orange
The hardiest of P. tobira clones, this selection is from JC Raulston Arboretum has survived temperatures to 0F without blinking. Large, evergreen shrub to small tree, to 8 ft tall x 6 ft wide, has shiny, dark green, rounded leaves and, in early summer, intensely fragrant, citrus-like, white flowers. Appreciates full sun to part shade, with regular summer water until established. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Pittosporaceae $16 2D

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Pittosporum x 'Sappy'
A Cistus introduction from a series of inter-specific hybrids this 15 ft tall plus by 6-8ft wide large shrub or possibly better yet small tree. Evergreen blue-green leaves, and creamy light yellow flowers in spring and early summer, ever so fragrant. Excellent small street tree, garden or screen. Full sun to dappled shade, some summer water where dry and fairly well drained soil. Hardy well into USDA zone 7.
Pittosporaceae $16 3D

Podocarpus alpinus 'County Park Fire'

Podocarpus alpinus 'County Park Fire'alpine plum yew
OoooH! We think we are becoming quite enamored with these little podocarps. Another down-under plant selected by famed County Park Nursery in the United Kingdom, this jewel-like little conifer, reaches only about 3 ft with densely held, shiny, rounded needles of deepest green/maroon in summer, taking on fiery purple-orange tints in winter, especially in new growth. A fabulous addition to container or garden. The P. alpinus group is one of the most hardy of the genus, this plant having been hardy to close to 0F in several gardens. Stunning when planted with other party goers such as Uncinia rubra and, maybe our favorite, Libertia peregrinans for a rusty contrast. Average soil conditions; bright light best; not appreciative of prolonged drought. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Podocarpaceae $16 4D

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Podocarpus chingianus UCSC 95-97
Related to P. chinensis, these rare podocarps grow to an eventual 20 ft tall x 6-8 ft wide. A striking architectural feature for the garden, with "needles" of 1/2" held against the stem giving an almost tufted appearance. Best in full sun or the light understory. Though drought tolerant, growth can be boosted by light summer watering. Frost hardy to 10F or so, USDA zone 8, and possibly lower.
Podocarpaceae $15 2D

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Podocarpus nivalis UCSC 75.44

$14 3D

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Podocarpus nivalis x totara UCSC 90.569

Podocarpaceae $14 2D

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Podocarpus parlatorei - cl 1 [Cistus plant] pine of the mountains
A beautiful and surprisingly hardy Andean podocarp shared with us by Woodlanders Nursery, reaching 15-20' in a reasonable time with a fine scaled, somewhat weeping habit in our garden, the foliage a cheerful green against silvery bark. Evergreen and happy in dappled shade to full sun and fairly well-drained soil with summer water in dry climates. Seems fine as low as USDA zone 8.
Podocarpaceae $18 3D

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Podocarpus totara 'Pendula' weeping totara
Large, gracefully weeping shrub, easily trained to small tree size, to 8-12 ft tall or so, with yellow-green, densely held needles and dense weeping branches as well, though these can be thinned to enhance the fine, graceful appearance. Easy care, requiring regular but infrequent water in dry summer places and sun for best needle color, though perfectly happy in dappled shade. This New Zealand native seems adaptable to both east and west. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7. Excellent container plants.
Podocarpaceae $15 3D

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Polygonatum odoratum - Suncrest

$15 3D

Polypodium scouleri

Polypodium scoulerievergreen licorice fern
Native to the coastal forest along the immediate Pacific Coast, growing on rocks and atop and among the gnarled branches of ancient redwoods. Our only evergreen licorice fern and an attractive plant in the garden -- even without the ancient trees -- to about 12" tall and slowly spreading. Very good for container, rooftop, or evergreen groundcover. Best where soil is rich and well-drained, in shade inland or sun along the immediate coast. Enjoys some summer moisture but dislikes being too wet. Frost hardy to 10F, zone 8.
Polypodiaceae $12 6in

Prostanthera lasianthos

Prostanthera lasianthosvictorian christmas bush
Tall and lush evergreen shrub, the largest of the Australian mint bushes, to 15 ft tall x 7-8 ft wide though easily kept smaller, with dark green, slightly toothed leaves, very minty when brushed or crushed. Lovely fat sprays, of white bell-flowers with purple and orange markings hang from the branches in late spring. Best in full to part sun, protected from winds and difficult winter weather, with regular summer water in driest climates at least until well-established. Frost hardy to the mid teens F, USDA zone 8b.
Lamiaceae $11 3D

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Prostanthera ovalifolia 'Variegata' Variegated mint bush
Aromatic, minty leaves, green with white margins, adorn this erect evergreen shrub from Australia. Grows quickly, to 8-12 ft tall x 6-8 ft wide. Blooms profusely in spring with abundant purple flowers on branched stalks above the foliage. Prefers sun or part shade with average summer water for best performance. Frost hardy to 20F, USDA zone 9.
Lamiaceae $14 2D

Prostanthera rotundifolia

Prostanthera rotundifoliaAustralian mint bush
From the wonderful group of Australian, shrubby mints. Brush past this mint bush and you are enveloped in a cloud of cool fragrance. Abundant pale purple flowers in spring and early summer. Shear lightly for repeat bloom. Sun and moist, fertile, well-drained soil. To 4-6 ft tall and nearly as wide. Plant in a protected spot away from harsh elements for winter survival in upper USDA zone 8. Easy in zone 9 and well worth a try below.
Lamiaceae $12 3D

Prunus laurocerasus 'Marble Queen'

Prunus laurocerasus 'Marble Queen'
Large very tough shrub for full sun to half shade. White flowers. Handsome evergreen foliage. You might even use it as a large hedging plant. Dependable and easy. 10 ft.
Rosaceae $16 3D

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Punica granatum 'Nana Plena' dwarf pomegranate
Dwarf, double-flowered pomegranate, to only 3 ft tall or so, with leaves smaller than the species and small, but spectacular, double flowers. USDA Zone 8a.
Lythraceae $12 3D

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Puya berteroniana - Mike Remmick
This southern high elevation collection from the Bio Bio drainage, bears rosettes to about 18", but clusters to 3-4'. This, collected within sight of snow lingering into early autumn is one of the tougher of it's species. 4' or higher flower stalks arise from the silvery rosettes, with inky blue flowers, attracting purple-polka-dotted hummingbirds... okay, maybe not. USDA zone 8, 7 if drier. Excellent container plant.
Bromeliaceae $14 2D

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