Plant Catalog for Mail Order: Fall 2018

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Machilus thunbergii
Another favorite Avocado relative, this with a long history in elite gardens of the coastal Northwest and Southeast. To 20-25', with flattened sprays of branches, and an upright, humble form. The 3-5" shiny, green tinted blue and copper (especially in new growth) leaves can be seen from quite a distance. Superb small garden tree, if provided occasional deep watering, and sun to filtered shade. Southern China. USDA zone 7.
Lauraceae $14 3D

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Magnolia laevifolia 'Free Spirit'
New for 2013. A most lovely small evergreen, a spreading to strongly weeping form of M. laevifolia with satiny copper colored indumentum on the leaves, stems, and flower buds. Very fragrant white flowers appear from early to late spring and occasionally again in autumn. To 3-4 ft tall and particularly useful planted atop walls, slopes or in containers. Best in sun to part shade with regular summer. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Magnoliaceae $16 3D

Magnolia virginiana

Magnolia virginiana
The ‘other’ evergreen southern magnolia, this much more graceful species has sweetly scented single white flowers midsummer borne above light green foliage. Small tree to 20 ft or so. Good as a street tree.
Magnoliaceae $22 3D

Mahonia eurybracteata 'Soft Caress' PP 20183

Mahonia eurybracteata 'Soft Caress' PP 20183
Selected by plantsman Ozzie Johnson as a particularly silver and more frost hardy form of a most lovely species, this plant to about 4 ft tall with finely divided leaves appearing almost as a delicate palm. For dappled shade to full sun with at least occasional summer water where dry. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8a, though known to have come through an Atlanta, zone 7 winter with only scorching.
Berberidaceae $19 3XD

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Mahonia fortunei [DJHC]
From Plantsman Dan Hinkley, this fine selection displays leaves about half the size of typical species, with very narrow leaflets, often tinted red upon emergence. The leaves only to 5-6" in entirety, the plant a graceful 5-6' but can be kept smaller. But wait, there's more. Also, not prone to mildew as others of the species. Sun to dappled shade, summer water where applicable, upper USDA zone 7.
Berberidaceae $14 3D

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Mahonia moranensis (druckerei)
Given to us by the late plantsman Peter Schick, from a collection in southern Mexico at about 7400'. The lone plant was in the Mendocino Botanic Garden, and has now disappeared. We're still working on the nomenclature, but we do know it's a compact, matte-leaved little Oregon grape (Oaxacan grape?) that thrives in gardens, produces abundant late winter yellow flowers, blue fruit that look most attractive around the red-tinted leaves and the upright form of the plant. Most soils, sun to shade, USDA zone 7.
Berberidaceae $18 2D

Mahonia pinnata ssp. insularis 'Shnilemoon'

Mahonia pinnata ssp. insularis 'Shnilemoon'
From the channel islands off southern California, this form named by the fabulous University of California Santa Cruz Arboretum. Makes a rounded shrub of upright branches with multiply-pinnate leaves, nearly round and the brightest spring green, held on very pretty, rather gracile, deep brown stems. All this adorned with cheery yellow flowers in late winter and spring and blue berries beyond. This is one of the most unique forms of a species native from southern Oregon to Baja. Prefers Mediterranean conditions....sorry Florida. Frost hardy to mid USDA zone 8. Tolerant and pleased with long periods of summer drought in either sun or shade.
Berberidaceae $15 4D

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Mahonia piperiana 'Spoonleaf'
Selected in Oregon's Northern Rogue valley by plantsman Frank Callahan, growing in dry chaparral country. To 4-6 ft and dense, with leaflets nearly round and very shiny. Late winter and early spring flowers are peach tinted, maturing to yellow followed by attractive masses of powdery blue berries. The plants are burnished red with winter frost or drought. Full sun to dappled shade with good drainage and preferring west coast summer dry conditions. Frost hardy to USDA zone 6.
Berberidaceae $015 3D

Mahonia x lindsayae 'Cantab'

Mahonia x lindsayae 'Cantab'
Sturdy 5 ft mound of large glossy upright-held leaves. Mid winter fragrant yellow flowers followed by dense blue berries that birds love. Ignored by deer, it prefers full to part sun and normal water. Zone 8
Berberidaceae $18 4in

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Manihot grahamii [San Marcos]
This South American native, a particularly gracile form from San Marcos Growers, is a 10-15 ft tree with graceful, schefflera-like leaves that remain only on top of the stem, creating a tropical effect. Sun along the coast to light shade inland with average summer water. Deciduous and top hardy to 25F, mid USDA zone 9, freezing back to the ground. Considered root hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
$16 3D

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Melanoselinum decipiens black parsley
Fondly called a ‘carrot-on-a-stick’ around the nursery, this monocarpic perennial from Madeira is serious eye candy. In flower the large pink umbels are stunning on 5-8 ft stalks with lush foliage.The blackness of the common name refers to the black berries that follow. Easy in half sun with normal water. Resprouts in spring in USDA zone 7 and up.
Apiaceae $7 4D

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Melicytus crassifolius UCSC 2007.19 thick-leaved mahoe
A sculptural shrub in the viola family (believe it or not!) from New Zealand. To 3 ft tall or so with small, glossy green leaves on fine-tipped divaricating branches, each stem adorned in sumer with white-pale lavender flowers followed by translucent berries. Good as an architectual specimen, in containers, or planted rock gardens. Enjoys consistent summer water and bright light. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Violaceae $12 3D

Metapanax delavayi

Metapanax delavayidelavay false ginseng
A truly elegant, evergreen aralia relative from Southern China, a shrub to 8-10 ft tall and wide, with finely cut, compound leaves and, in maturity, clusters of white flowers in late summer turning to black berries, winter food for the birds. Best in dappled sun to partial shade in rich, moist soil. Our clone, from the University of Washington Arboretum in Seattle, is frost hardy and undamaged in upper USDA zone 7 and possibly lower. (Synonym: Nothopanax delavayi)
Araliaceae $14 4D

Metapanax delavayi 'Stout'

Metapanax delavayi 'Stout'stout delavay false ginseng
A Cistus introduction. Selected from our seed grown plants, this clone of an already desirable evergreen aralia relative, has rather thickened compound leaves, more schefflera-like than its brethren. A graceful shrub or small tree, these have a sturdy form, maintaining an upright stance. Mature plants produce late summer clusters of white flowers that become black berries providing winter food for the birds. Dappled sun to part shade and rich, moist soil are best. 12ft tall. Frost hardy to upper USDA zone 7 and possibly lower. (The species, until recently, was Nothopanax delavayi.)
Araliaceae $18 4D

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Metrosideros umbellata [Wangaloa] southern rata
This collection from New Zealand's South Island is from one of the colder habitats of one of the most frost hardy of the New Zealand Christmas tree species -- hopefully making these wonderful creatures available to more gardeners. This shrub or small tree grows slowly, eventually reaching 10 or 15 ft or a bit more, with narrow, shiny, bright green leaves and a dense habit, making it a fine garden plant for formality or screen. Mature plants are topped in early summer with bright red, powder puff flowers, magic for bees and hummingbirds. Sun to part shade with regular summer water. As these prefer cooler soils, they are probably not a plant for the US South. We expect these to be fully frost hardy to 15F, mid USDA zone 8, and possibly lower -- let us know. We are very excited to offer this form as we've been looking for hardier southern rata for many years and we think we might have found it.
Myrtaceae $18 2D

Mitraria coccinea - David Mason’s Robust

Mitraria coccinea - David Mason’s Robustchilean mitre flower
South American gesneriad, an evergreen, scrambling shrub or small, interwoven mound with small, dark green leaves and flaming orange-red tubular flowers from late May-July. Requires protection from wind and moist, well-drained soil, rich in humus, in bright light or part shade where roots can remain cool. Easy in USDA zone 9 and tolerates temperatures to 10F, zone 8, in the best locations. Otherwise good in containers with winter protection.
Gesneriaceae $12 3D

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Monardella obispoensis

Lamiaceae $12 2D

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monardella SBH 12325

Lamiaceae $12 2D

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monardella sp. SBH 12298

Lamiaceae $12 3D

Monardella villosa 'Russian River'

Monardella villosa 'Russian River'coyote mint
Native to California, this form was selected by California Flora Nursery from plants found along the Russian River. A tough and vigorous, shrubby perennial, these grow to 1-2 ft tall in clumps to 2 ft wide, with rounded, minty, gray-green leaves on brittle stems. Spring to summer flowers are fragrant, lavendar-pink magnets for hummingbirds and bees. Full sun and well-drained soil are best where summer water is not provided. Said to be deer resistant AND makes a fine tea. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 7.
Lamiaceae $12 2D

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Morus 'Itogawa' thread leaf white mulberry
This unforgettable dwarf mulberry presents a tangled face with twisted branches and cut leaves that curl and float, adding to the complex, lacy texture -- easy to love. This is an old Japanese selection, a small shrub that reaches 1-3 ft tall in sun to part shade. Deciduous and appearing like twisted sticks in the winter once the ribbony leaves have provided their yellow fall display. Works well for bonsai, in containers, or as a striking specimen in the garden. Said to be deer resistant as well. Frost hardy to -20F, USDA zone 5. 'Itoguwa' translates as "Atomic Blast', as if the plant had been through a disaster and survived.
Moraceae $16 4D

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Muehlenbeckia complexa 'Texture Big Leaf'
A straightforward cultivar name for a robust form, shared by Texture Plants of Christchurch, New Zealand, collected quite probably from Three Kings Island. The large leaves, on the same dark stems as others in the genus, can exceed 1" in diameter. Forms a vigorous vine, to 10 ft or more, or a formidable ground cover / spiller. Can root along the stems and could be a bit energetic for the small garden. It can definitely be useful in urban spaces, or where good coverage is wanted in sun to part shade. Spreads slowly or not at all away from summer water, a good control in the American west. Though its origins suggest tenderness, all indications suggest frost hardiness to the single digits F, USDA zone 7b. Wonderful hanging basket or container filler.
Polygonaceae $9 3D

Muehlenbeckia complexa 'Tricolor'

Muehlenbeckia complexa 'Tricolor'tricolor wire grass
A variegated version of the useful, ground-covering wire grass, the leaves splashed with green, white, and pink on dark, wiry stems to only 6" in height, spreading slowly. Evergreen, forming dense mats in sun to part shade in almost any soil but needing some summer water where particularly dry. Very good around steps or larger specimens such as New Zealand flax. Also successful in containers. Frost hardy to 8F, upper edge of USDA zone 7. Sometimes sold as M. axillaris.
Polygonaceae $11 3D

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Muehlenbeckia ephedroides
From rocky riverbank terraces of New Zealand's south island comes our selection of what looks more like a blue stemmed broom then wire grass. Mounding or spilling to about 18" x well, really wide. Superb container or wall plant. Full to part sun, easy care, but prefers a bit of summer water where dry. Zone 8, probably into 7.
$11 4in

Mukdenia rossii

Mukdenia rossii
Ground-covering perennial, a Heuchera relative from China discovered by the late plantsman, Steve Doonan. Slowly clumping, to 1 ft x 1 ft, in well-drained soil with generous water until established. Quite drought tolerant thereafer. Leaves are a bright, shiny green and the white spring flowers make a nice contrast. Sun to part shade. Frost hardy in USDA zone 4.
Saxifragaceae $9 4D

Muscari macrocarpum 'Wayne's Clone'

Muscari macrocarpum 'Wayne's Clone'
It’s the fragrance! an amazing and rich sweet fragrance that captures everyone who sniffs the flowers of this reasonably rare grape hyacinth selected by our friend Wayne Roderick. Clusters of robust, yellow flowers appear in early spring standing above the grassy foliage that remains evergreen in the upper 20sF. Slowly increases by division of bulbs. Best in well drained soil or in an easily accessible container -- close to paths and close to sniffing level - not to miss the intoxicating scent. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 and possibly into zone 7.
Liliaceae $15 4in

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Myrceugenia [ex suca [Mike Remmick]]
radel 7 taza S +5000 ft
Myrtaceae $14 3D

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Myrtus communis - upright red
This, a result of our hybridizing over the years, forms a most fragrant shrub to 4-6 ft with red stems and upturned leaves, also tinted red especially in new growth. Charming, white spring flowers lead to blue fruit. Otherwise the same as other Myrtus, loving mineral soil, bright light and tolerating of summer drought. Frost hardy to the bottoms of USDA zone 8.
Myrtaceae $14 2D

Myrtus communis 'Variegata'

Myrtus communis 'Variegata'variegated sweet myrtle
Pretty selection of a popular myrtle, the fragrant leaves, glossy green with creamy white margins, creating a lovely background for the abundant, small, white summer flowers -- also fragrant. A medium sized, bushy shrub, reaching 8-10 ft tall and wide, these are easily trimmed or sheared. Useful as a hedge or specimen in the sunny garden. Drought tolerant once established and frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Myrtaceae $12 3D

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Myrtus communis ssp. tarentina 'Variegata'
A very hardy form of myrtle. Sturdy and useful compact shrub, evergreen, to 2-3 ft, with narrow, glossy green leaves edged white and pink-tinged white flowers followed by white berries. Best in full sun without too much supplemental water. Leaves are very aromatic and were once considered an aphrodisiac..... Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Myrtaceae $14 2D

Narcissus bulbocodium var. conspicuus

Narcissus bulbocodium var. conspicuushoop petticoat daffodil
Diminutive and tough little daffodil, superbly adapted to dry areas and rock gardens. The 6-12" tufts of chive-like foliage appear in autumn in mild climates with bright yellow, 1" hoops appearing as early as February. In colder climates, foliage appears in February with flowers in early spring. This European native multiplies freely in well-drained soil in sun to a bit of shade. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.
Amaryllidaceae $11 4D

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Narcissus bulbocodium var. nivalis Hoop-Petticoat
One of the cheeriest of the southern Mediterraneans as far as Narcissi go, this flowering in February and March in our climate, well after many of it's relatives. Chive like spring-green leaves emerge in late autumn to earliest winter with butter yellow trumpets for good contrast. Increases quickly, prefers some summer dry but not necessary. Go for it! USDA zone 6.
Amaryllidaceae $11 2D

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Nerium oleander - double pink variegated
Classic shrub of the Mediterranean, this one with green and yellow leaves and lovely, double pink flowers.. Tough into zone USDA 7, freezing back at the very bottom end but recovering to flower that year, at least in warmer summer climates. To 4ft or so with dense habit in full baking sun with very little summer water.
Apocynaceae $16 4D

Nerium oleander 'Hardy Pink'

Nerium oleander 'Hardy Pink'
Hardiest of the oleander clones in cultivation with bright pink flowers on an evergreen shrub reaching to 4-6 ft tall. Loves full, blasty sun with little to no supplemental summer water once established. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 and, though the leaves can burn around 14F, mid USDA zone 8, these have resprouted from brief spells in the low, single digits F, zone 7.
Apocynaceae $14 2D

Nerium oleander 'Hardy White'

Nerium oleander 'Hardy White'hardy white oleander
The hardiest of the oleander clones in cultivation, these with pure white flowers on 4-6 ft, evergreen shrubs. Full sun, bright and blasty, is what they like without requiring a great deal of supplemental irrigation in summer. Undamaged when temperatures dip to the mid teens, mid USDA zone 8, though the leaves can burn around 14F. Plants have resprouted from the low single digits in zone 7.
Apocynaceae $14 4D

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Olea europaea 'Skylark Dwarf'
This selection seems to top out at about 6-8 ft. Few fruits since it is self sterile and has somewhat (how do I say this?) distorted anthers. Shrubby and ornamental. Full sun in lean, well-drained soil. Water to establish but withhold in late summer to harden. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Oleaceae $14 3D

Olearia x scilloniensis - white form

Olearia x scilloniensis - white formdaisy bush
An extremely tough, little evergreen shrub, to 3-6 ft tall and wide, with a rounded form, gray-green foliage that is handsome year round, and densely held corymbs of pure white flowers -- daisy-like with yellow centers -- over a long spring bloom. This cross between O. lirata and O. phlogopappa is best in sun and lean, well-drained soil with a little summer water. Evergreen to the upper teens F, USDA zone 8b, and frost hardy in zone 8a in a protected spot.
Asteraceae $12 3D

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Ophiopogon 'Golden Zebra'

Liliaceae / Asparagaceae $12 3D

Ophiopogon 'Seiryu'

Ophiopogon 'Seiryu'
Exceptionally useful small scale groundcover or pot filler, this little Mondo, to 5-6" in height, slowly spreading, with threadlike green and white striped foliage, appearing silvery white from a distance, pale blue flowers and translucent purple fruit, useful among other larger plantings, stepping stones, or as contrast for dark foliage. Shade to 3/4 sun in our part of the world, would like reasonably moist soil, though can dry out in summer once established. USDA zone 7, if not 6.
Liliaceae / Asparagaceae $12 3D

Ophiopogon japonicus 'Silver Comet'

Ophiopogon japonicus 'Silver Comet'snake beard
Cheerful, evergreen mondo grass with tallish, grassy leaves, to 8" tall or so, green with fine white stripes. Summer flowers are white, echoing the variegation, and followed by blue berries. Spreads slowly by underground rhizomes, making small, bright clumps in part sun with regular summer water. Frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 6.
Liliaceae / Asparagaceae $12 4D

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Ophiopogon planiscapus 'Way Good Variegated'
A Cistus Introduction. Ultra fine selection of mondo grass with olive green leaves evenly pinstriped a creamy white. Vigorous, spreading at least as fast as more common versions in damp soil. Fine in nearly full sun to fairly dense shade with regular summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6.
$14 3D

Opuntia 'Achy Breaky'

Opuntia 'Achy Breaky'
This complex undoubtedly three way hybrid (O. polyacantha x O. erinaceae v. columbiana x O. fragilis) from the mountains of eastern Oregon (where everyone know things get a little wild) grows only to 6" or so in height and about 3 ft wide, sporting white rust and deep brown spines along with chartreuse and yellow, late spring flowers, and provides interest in both texture and compactness. As is true for one of its parents, O. fragilis, the pads easily detach and connect to anyone or thing walking by. Good for sharing with friends; not so great in regions prone to violent shaking. Cactus requirements -- lean soil, good drainage, and little to no summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $14 3D

Opuntia 'Baby Rita'

Opuntia 'Baby Rita'baby rita prickly pear
One of the most beautifully colored forms of the frost hardy cacti, a compact prickly pear to 2 ft, with pads to 3-4" that emerge blue-green often aging to greenish yellow tinted pink -- in this case a natural occurrence that doesn't indicate a lack of fertilizer. Late spring, ruffled flowers add to the palette. A hybrid cross between O. santa-rita and O. basilaris, this has all the charm of O. santa-rita in a much smaller plant. Full sun with sharp drainage. Frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 6. Great in containers.
Cactaceae $16 2D

Opuntia 'Cyclops'

Opuntia 'Cyclops'cyclops prickly pear
Though the name has been around a long time, this plant's origins are unclear We do know this is a cute little prickly pear to 1 ft or 18" in height, probably having O. macrorhiza in its ancestry, with rounded pads of 4-6" forming tight clusters with dark bunches of spines appearing as polka dots from a distance. Cheery yellow flowers appear in mid to late spring. Good for container or sunny garden. And, as one would expect, very drought tolerant though west of the Sierra or Cascades would like a drink from the hose once in a while to spur growth. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $15 4D

Opuntia 'Golden Lion'

Opuntia 'Golden Lion'
This natural hybrid between Opuntia davisii and O. kleinii, found in the Davis mountains of western Texas, creates a small cholla-like shrub to 3 ft with golden spines – rather obnoxious ones at that -- and pea-green flowers that age to yellow. Frost hardy to -20 F, USDA zone 5, and possibly lower with sharp drainage and full sun.
Cactaceae $15 4D

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Opuntia 'Paradox'

Cactaceae $15 4in

Opuntia 'Red Gem'

Opuntia 'Red Gem'prickly pear
A gorgeous little prickly pear given to us by Colorado's Kelly Grummons and we could find no better description than this with hopefully enough credit due: "An apparent hybrid between O. basilaris or O. aurea with O. fragilis! To 4" high x 18" wide, with small, round, 2-3" wide pads that have very short spines and are fragile (pads break off easily). The petite, deep pinkish red flowers in June are abundant. Beautiful in the rock garden or in containers. Fergusen thinks this MAY be Opuntia polyacantha v. schweriniana … still a mystery." Frost hardy to -30, USDA Zone 4.
Cactaceae $14 4D

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Opuntia basilaris 'Isabella Blue'
A Cistus Introduction: This particularly attractive beavertail with a very light golden pattern of glochids and powdery blue stems comes from a unique spot near Lake Isabella growing among oaks and pines in more typical California oak woodland (rather than in the Mojave Desert). That makes this plant capable of withstanding long periods of summer drought AND a good winter soaking. Strawberry colored flowers in mid spring. To 12-18" in height and 2-3 feet wide (wider if kicked around by cattle as in its native habitat). Careful drainage, bright light. Zone 5.
Cactaceae $15 4D

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Opuntia basilaris SBH 9225

Cactaceae $12 3D

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Opuntia basilaris ssp. whitneyana SBH 7775a beavertail cactus
Plants from these colonies close to 8700 ft elevation near Mt. Whitney in the eastern Sierra Nevada received some of my first collection numbers during a hike just after high school. This more recent collection from the same area forms a rather dense clump of blue-green pads, to about 4", with neatly spaced, orange glochids and abundant purple-pink flowers in late spring. Has been easy in cultivation though seems to like a well-drained mix whether in the garden or in container, the granite scree in which it grows naturally being a good indicator. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4, or lower.
Cactaceae $15 4D

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Opuntia basilaris ssp. whitneyana SBH 7775b
warm orange glaucids
Cactaceae $15 4D

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Opuntia basilaris ssp. whitneyana SBH 7775d
Plants from these colonies close to 8700 ft elevation near Mt. Whitney in the eastern Sierra Nevada received some of my first collection numbers during a hike just after high school. This more recent collection from the same area forms a rather dense clump of blue-green, rounded pads, to about 4", with neatly spaced, orange glochids and abundant purple-pink flowers in late spring. Has been easy in cultivation though seems to like a well-drained mix whether in the garden or in container, the granite scree in which it grows naturally being a good indicator. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4, or lower.
Cactaceae $15 4in

Opuntia basilaris var. brachyclada - San Bernardino County

Opuntia basilaris var. brachyclada - San Bernardino County
Rare and endangered beavertail prickly pear native to chaparral and oak/pine woodland areas in southern California--this one from San Bernardino County--with blue-gray paddles, short and numerous spines, and huge bright pink cup-shaped flowers in late spring and early summer. Height to 12" and width to 3-4'. Full sun. Little to no water needed. Frost hardy to USDA zone 7.
Cactaceae $16 4in

Opuntia basilaris var. brachyclada 'Mormon Rock'

Opuntia basilaris var. brachyclada 'Mormon Rock'
A Cistus introduction from the vicinity of Mormon Rock in southern California. This tightly clumping small form of beavertail has conical blue pads somewhat more flattened than the typical subspecies indicating a possible hybrid. Whatever the botanical case, each pad is only about 3" wide with well-spaced, bright orange glochids giving the whole plant a very cheery appearance. Nice medium-to-cherry-pink flowers appears in mid spring. Not minding extra winter moisture, these are a bit easier to grow than other beavertails, enjoying full sun. Excellent pot or rock garden plant and frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 5, probably zone 4.
Cactaceae $15 4D

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Opuntia basilaris var. heilii - Type local beavertail cactus
Named for botanist Ken Heil and collected from the northeastern population of the beavertail cactus. This clone, found growing in heavy alkaline soil in south central Utah and collected via a single pad years ago by plantsman Tim Hanis, produces dense clusters of blue-bodied plants, rather short on glochids, a good thing! It has been our favorite so far growing robustly and producing abundant, warm pink flowers in late spring. Easy in in the ground or container provided full sun and good drainage. Frost hardy to at least -30F, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $14 4D

Opuntia echinocarpa SBH 7777

Opuntia echinocarpa SBH 7777wiggin's cholla
A Cistus introduction. This collection originally made in 1981 from the eastern Sierra Nevada at the base of Mt. Whitney is of compact form, making a small "tree" cholla adorned with golden spines and greenish flowers mid spring. This one likes particularly well drained soils and is excellent in containers with bright light, especially where it can be back lit. USDA Zone 5 if not colder.
Cactaceae $14 2D

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Opuntia erinacea x 'Pink n' White' - Emory County, UT [TH]
USDA Zone 4, pink flowers
Cactaceae $14 4in

Opuntia erinacea x fragilis var. columbiana 'Clarno'

Opuntia erinacea x fragilis var. columbiana 'Clarno'
Particularly attractive form of this lovely native from the painted desert country in Central Oregon. Rounded pads to 3" across bear evenly spaced, golden spines and form clumps to 18" tall. Lean, well-drained soil provides the best site in the garden with little water in summer. Frost hardy to -20F, USDA zone 5, or lower. A good container or rock garden plant.
Cactaceae $11 4D

Opuntia fragilis - dwarf golden

Opuntia fragilis - dwarf goldendwarf brittle prickly pear
Shared with us by friend Panayoti Kelaidis of Denver, this small mat former, quickly to about 3" high x 18" wide and eventually larger, has 1/2" pads with golden glochids and spines. Shy to flower. Very attractive in troughs, pots, or rock gardens, anywhere a low sun angle can can make the golden spines glow. Cactus conditions required -- sun, lean and well-drained soil, and little summer water. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $12 4D

Opuntia fragilis - Sequim, Washington

Opuntia fragilis - Sequim, Washingtonbrittle pricklypear
From a collection by Ian Barclay near his wonderful nursery in Sequim Washington, this rainshadow population growing on rocks near the Puget Sound might not be the most beautiful form in the world but it certainly is interesting! A rather sparsely spined creature, forming open clumps with occasional light yellow flowers. It is always a surprise to come across a prickly pear west of the Cascades Mountains and these have surprised many a beachcomber taking a break on nearby rocks. Sun for sure. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $12 3D

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Opuntia fragilis 'Alberta Sunset'
A Claude Barr introduction many years ago, this diminutive plant from the northern Great Plains grows only to 4-5" to height forming colonies of dense clumps to 18" in diameter over time. With nearly spineless pads and colors beginning warm yellow and aging through colors of the sunset. Fantastic for the rock garden or a small container. Zone 3
Cactaceae $11 3D

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Opuntia fragilis 'Neon Gold'
A Cistus Inroduction. Our southern Utah collection of this probable hybrid with fragilis, golden spines, and clumping 4 to 6" in height by 2' across in a couple of years. The most striking feature ,brightly salmon to coral colored pads as they emerge in the spring. Excellent container plant, or rock garden subject, for bright light, well drained soil. USDA zone 4 at least.
Cactaceae $12 3D

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Opuntia fragilis 'Red Hill'
A Cistus introduction. From the place of the same name in Oregon's painted hills, this diminutive creature to about 4" in height spreading to 18" or so unless getting caught in your socks, in which case further. Shiny green pads, burnished red with drought or cold, each one looking like little beans with small golden, turning to rust, spines. Light yellow flowers occasionally in spring. Good drainage, excellent for container or rock garden, bright light. USDA Zone 5.
Cactaceae $11 3D

Opuntia fragilis (debreczyi) var. denuda 'Potato'

Opuntia fragilis (debreczyi) var. denuda 'Potato'potato cactus
This variety of the fragile prickly pear from the western Colorado plateau tends to be almost entirely nekkid, not even having the tiny glochids we've come to enjoy. A favorite of rock and trough gardeners, these have round pads, to under 2", that clump to at least 3 ft wide but only a few inches in height, turning purplish in winter and producing occasional lemon-yellow flowers in mid spring. This clone shared with us by Western Colorado's Don Campbell. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA Zone 4, possibly lower.
Cactaceae $12 2D

Opuntia fragilis var. denudata 'Bronze Beauty'

Opuntia fragilis var. denudata 'Bronze Beauty'marble cactus
This little beauty has small, rounded pads, to only 5" tall, that are dark green, turning reddish-bronze in bright light and cool weather. Forms handsome and colorful clumps to 15" wide with obvious orange glochids but no spines. In late spring to early summer, large, pale yellow flowers appear, turning peachy for their second day. Best in full to light shade and lean, well-drained soil. Drought tolerant but occasional summer water improves appearance. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4. Also known as A. fragilis 'Bronze Beauty.
Cactaceae $11 2D

Opuntia fragilis x 'Duchesne Red'
This probable hybrid from the county of the same name, has chubby little pads about 1 by 2", forming 8 to 10" compact clusters with gray and black spines, prominant red glouchids and light yellow flowers. Easy to grow if given bright light and summer moisture along with well drained soil, excellent in containers. USDA zone 4 at least.
Cactaceae $12

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Opuntia fragilis x erinacea 'San Juan Grey'
A Cistus Introduction. From a diverse hybrid cluster southeast of Moab UT comes this 6" by 18" mound former, distinctly greenish grey pads adorned with short black and grey spines, warm yellow flowers mid spring. Happy in any well drained soil, including rock garden or container if provided full sun. USDA zone 3.
$14 2D

Opuntia humifusa - dwarf from Claude Barr

Opuntia humifusa - dwarf from Claude Barr
This early selection by Great Plains plantsman Claude Barr grows to only 5-6" in height but forms a rather dense mat of rounded, shiny green and nearly spineless pads to about 3 ft wide. Cheery yellow flowers appear in summer followed by reddish fruit. Fabulous for planters or as spillers and easy to grow in most soil provided there is no standing water. Some summer water helps to push growth. Frost hardy in USDA zone 3 or 4.
Cactaceae $12 4D

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Opuntia humifusa 'Major'
As the name implies, certainly a particularly large form of this typically creeping prickly pear found throughout the southeastern US. To 4 feet or more in width with 6 inch pads and blunt, golden central spines, making it particularly pretty when backlit. Warm yellow flowers with orange anthers adorn the plant in mid spring and occasionally in summer (when watered) followed by red fruit. Very good container plant or landscape creature. Also one of the best for partial shade. To USDA zone 3
Cactaceae $12 3D

Opuntia macrocentra 'Kunzleri'

Opuntia macrocentra 'Kunzleri'long-spined purplish pricklypear
Named for New Mexico plantsman Horst Kunzler, this short, broad form of a most beautiful prickly pear has bluish pads tinted pink in winter -- each pad at least 6" wide and topped with dark "eyelash" spines -- and yellow, orange-centered flower in mid to late spring. Best with sun and a dryish root run. Frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 6. Fab container plant.
Cactaceae $15 4D

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Opuntia microdasys - dwarf red

Cactaceae $12 2D

Opuntia microdasys 'Albuquerque'

Opuntia microdasys 'Albuquerque'
Given to us long ago and found in an old Albuquerque garden in a rather chilly climate where the species often comes to winter...These bunny's ears grow to about 18" tall and spreading to 3' or more over time. The polka dot yellow pattern of the glochids is attractive... Beware though - their soft appearance is misleading as those glochids can be annoying if brushed. Small yellow flowers in mid spring. Zone 7 with good drainage. A good container specimen.
Cactaceae $12 3D

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Opuntia phaeacantha - Millard County
A Cistus introduction. One of the best opuntias for fruit, shared with us by keen-eyed plantsman Tim Hanis. This low grower, to only about 12-18" but spreading to 4-5' has bluish pads, rusty spines, yellow flowers with a hint of orange, and abundant dark red fruit from mid-summer through autumn. Beautiful in the garden, even if you don't make jelly. Full sun, reasonably well-drained soil, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $15 4in

Opuntia polyacantha

Opuntia polyacanthaplains pricklypear
These common natives of western dry lands in have round to oval pads, from 1-4" long with dense spines ("polyacantha" means "many thorns") up to 2" long, and form spreading mats to 4-12" tall and up to several feet wide. Early summer flowers are pale yellow and abundant. Cold hardy to USDA zone 4
Cactaceae $14 4in

Opuntia polyacantha 'Imnaha Blue'

Opuntia polyacantha 'Imnaha Blue'
A Cistus introduction. A common native of western dry lands, this clone, from northeastern Oregon's Imnaha Canyon, was found weeping several feet off a cliff of red ryolite, the nearly spineless, gray-blue pads appearing almost as if hanging in chains. Assuming not everyone has a cliff, these will form spreading mats to 4-12" tall and up to several feet wide. Early summer flowers are a warm, soft yellow. Ordinary cactus requirements -- sun, lean and well-drained soil, and little or no summer water. Undoubtedly frost hardy into USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $14 3D

Opuntia polyacantha SBH 7505b

Opuntia polyacantha SBH 7505b
A Cistus introduction and a vigorous plant, growing to 15-18" tall x about 3 ft wide, with shaggy white to straw colored spines completely obscuring the pads. In mid to late spring saturated yellow flowers appear, each aging tangerine in time, giving a bi-colored effect. Seems to flower best when allowed to grow as it pleases, so be lenient. Needs full sun, good drainage. Good in rock gardens, troughs, or containers. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $14 4D

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Opuntia polyacantha x - Dechesne, CO

Cactaceae $14 4D

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Opuntia polyacantha x erinacea var. columbiana SBH 7524
Large, 3-4in bluish pads, very twisted spines (few). Warm yellow/orange w/ red stamens. Zone 4
Cactaceae $14 4D

Opuntia potsii var. montana

Opuntia potsii var. montana
A wonderful little cactus from Santa Fe, New Mexico, to only 4" tall x 30" wide, with green pads and very short spines. Summer flowers are lemon yellow, single and simple. Best in lean soil, good drainage, and bright light, though these are more shade tolerant than most opuntias. Needs little to no summer water. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA Zone 4.
Cactaceae $14 3D

Opuntia pusilla - gold spined form

Opuntia pusilla - gold spined formcockspur prickly pear
Diminutive, mat-forming prickly pear from the Gulf Coast to the lower Carolinas, found most often in coastal sand dunes with 2" flattened pads, yellow flowers, and, in this form, golden spines, making a most attractive, fast-growing garden or container plant. Pads easily detach and can be shared purposely or not. Frost hardy in low USDA zone 7, possibly zone 6. Quite moisture tolerant as well.
Cactaceae $14 2D

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Opuntia ramosissima 'Semi Freddie' pencil cholla, diamond cholla
A Cistus introduction. This from an area straddling the Arizona/Nevada border, where the forms tend to make 3 to 4' wide, fairly dense clumps of about 18" in height, looking of under sea creatures with but a few small spines atop rose tinted stems. These plants have been subject to much less passive recreation and botanizing, and have been run over a number of times by off-road vehicles......too bad the spines aren't sharper. USDA Zone 6.
Cactaceae $12 2D

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Opuntia sp. SBH 9116b - mini pad

Cactaceae $12 3D

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Opuntia x 'Upright Oblong'
A Cistus introduction. This little gem, collected from a diverse area of Opuntia hybrids near Browse, Utah, shown to us originally by plantsman Tim Hannis, appears to have O. basilaris var. aurea and O. polyacantha in it's genes. A dense clump, to about 12" in height by about 18" wide, with dark green tinted red nearly spineless pads that are shaped well, upright and oblong. Pleasing pink flowers in early to mid spring. Tolerant of most prickly pear conditions if given sharp drainage, mineral soil, good light. USDA zone 5, if not colder.
Cactaceae $14 4D

Osmanthus fragrans

Osmanthus fragransFragrant Tea Olive
The word "osmanthus" means fragrant flower. Imagine warm ripe apricots on a summer evening and you will come close to the floral scent of this ancient Chinese species. An evergreen shrub, to 10-12 ft tall x 6-8 ft wide, with shiny green leaves and, in autumn, clusters of small, cream colored flowers. Best in part shade in rich moist soil receiving regular summer water. Frost hardy to 5F, mid USDA zone 7.
Oleaceae $15 3D

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Osmanthus fragrans 'Nanjing's Beauty' Fragrant Tea Olive
A superior selection of sweet olive. Red-tinged new growth only adds to its main appeal of late fall-blooming, intensely fragrant creamy-white flowers. Traditional plant of Chinese gardens. Evergreen to 10'+, especially useful trained as a small tree. Hardy to 10F. USDA zone 8.
Oleaceae $16 3D

Osmanthus heterophyllus 'Riptide'upright false holly
The form of this lovely creature suggests a very upright and narrow O. heterophyllus 'Gulftide' with shiny, rather prickly leaves, orangey new growth, and white autumn flowers combining to create a fine garden plant. Expected to reach 8-10 ft tall by 4-5 ft wide. Good for formal hedges, specimens, or container plants. Happy in sun or shade, and drought tolerant though, in dry climates, a little summer water helps develop flower buds. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Oleaceae $15 3D

Oxalis 'Plum Crazy'

Oxalis 'Plum Crazy'
Wow. Spectacular heat-loving wood sorrel with a splash of purple and green leaves and petite yellow flowers. Mounded habit is perfect for the woodland garden or as a filler in mixed containers. Full sun to partial shade. Height 6". USDA zone 8.
Oxalidaceae $7 3D

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Oxalis crassipes 'White Pearl'

Oxalidaceae $9 3D

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Oxalis spiralis ssp. vulcanicola 'Molten Lava'
Yellow flowers over small, red, green, orange and yellow foliage. Yum! Nice in a hanging basket or as a punch to that tired border. Frost hardy most winters, but take cuttings to be sure. Sun for best color in all but the hottest climates. Summer water. Has gone through 20F, bottom of USDA zone 9.
Oxalidaceae $9 4in

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Ozothamnus ledifolius
A most textural and delightful shrub with waxy green leaves on golden stems. Light yellow puffy flowers in summer. Grows 3ft tall x 5ft wide. Drought tolerant once established. Grow in sun to part sun. USDA zone 7.
asteraceae $12 2D

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Pachistema myrsinites SBH/GPP 12223

Celastraceae $11 2D

Parahebe perfoliata

Parahebe perfoliata
Light purple pendant bells all summer carried above handsome grey-green foliage. Tough and dependable in the perennial border or draping over a wall. Sun to part shade, regular water.
Plantaginaceae $12 3D

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Parthenocissus henryana - Berkeley Garden Form silvervein creeper
Chinese ... Boston ivy. This elegant clinging vine can reach up to 20 ft or more, the deciduous leaves flushed burgundy with silver markings during the growing season. This clone, a sport from our long-ago gardens in Berkeley CA, has particularly good coloration and the most stunning, red-orange fall color, more pronounced when plants are grown in shade. Drought tolerant once established but would prefer some summer water where very dry. Frost hardy in the upper end of USDA zone 6. A good spiller for containers.
Vitaceae $15 4D

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Penstemon pinifolius Western Pine-leaved Penstemon
Long-lived perennial with evergreen pine-like foliage and orange-red flowers late spring through the summer. Hummingbird candy. Great on a sunny slope or rock garden. Grows to about a foot high x 2 feet wide in sun to part shade Drought tolerant but tolerates regular garden conditions. Frost hardy to -15F, mid USDA zone 5.
Plantaginaceae $9 2D

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Persea podadenia

$16 4D

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Persicaria 'Mercury'
A Cistus introduction, this garden seedling in Persicaria land, noticed by our propagator, Evan Bean, grows only to about 3.5' with narrow, olive green streaked gray, and burgundy leaves. Handsome and vigorous, like Evan himself, and easy as well, but no comment here. Small, bead-like light pink flowers late in season add to it's attractiveness. Adequate moisture, sun to light shade, good in container. USDA zone 5.
Polygonaceae $12 3D

Philadelphus 'Innocence'

Philadelphus 'Innocence'mock orange
A most lovely form of the old-fashioned mock orange with particularly striking variegated leaves on this 6-8 ft, arching, deciduous shrub. Shared with us by our friend, Deborah Chaffee, the flowers are particularly fragrant, noticeable at a great distance from spring through early summer and occasionally thereafter -- with regular watering. Drought tolerant once established; sun to dappled shade. Frost hardy in USDA zone 4.
Hydrangeaceae $014 3D

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Philadelphus madrensis desert mountain mock orange
Sweet little mock orange, native to the US Southwest and extremely drought tolerant, with highly fragrant, small white flowers, sometimes rose-centered, and small leaves, to only 1/2". A deciduous shrub, to 4 ft tall, for bright light and lean, well-drained soil. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7 and possibly into upper zone 6.
Hydrangeaceae $014 3D

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Philadelphus mexicanus 'Floroplena' double flowered mock orange
Choice evergreen, arching shrub with abundant, intoxicatingly fragrant, double white flowers through much of the summer. Can be 15 ft tall with support or maintained as a medium shrub, removing oldest branches after flowering. Full sun to part shade. Drought tolerant once established but accepting of summer water. Tolerates heat with humidity. Frost hardy to mid USDA zone 8 and above.
Hydrangeaceae $14 3D

Philadelphus mexicanus 'Rosemary Brown'

Philadelphus mexicanus 'Rosemary Brown'
A Cistus introduction from a wild collection in the highlands of northeastern Mexico. Evergreen, silvery arching shrub to 4 ft weighted down with squared, pure white, intensely fragrant flowers displayed upright & overlapping. Very desirable. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.
Hydrangeaceae $14 2D

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Phlomis 'Sunningdale Gold' jerusalem sage
Always interested in fuzzy plants, we are captivated by the warm, golden indumentum that covers leaf and stem of this evergreen shrublet. Shared with us by British plantsman John Grimshaw, it is our new favorite phlomis. Early summer brings cheerful yellow and fuzzy flowers that lead to fuzzy seed capsules in summer and autumn. To about 3 ft tall with a broad pyramidal growth habit. Perfect for the Mediterranean border in any spot with sun, well-drained soil and limited summer water. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Lamiaceae $12 2D

Phlomis fruticosa

Phlomis fruticosaJerusalem sage
Wooly leaved shrub - to 4 x 4 ft -- the leaves a soft gray on top and white underneath. Whorls of yellow, drapey, slightly fuzzy flowers -- very cheerful -- on upright stems from spring through summer. Full sun to light shade with little summer water for these natives of Mediterranean Europe. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Lamiaceae $12 3D

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Phlomis monocephala jerusalem sage
Wooly leaved shrub, from Turkey and very much like its close relative P. fruticosa. To 4 ft tall and wide with pale, blue-green, slight fuzzy leaves that take on a coppery fuzz over time and, in spring to early summer, two-lipped, yellow flowers appear on upright stems. Full sun to light shade and well-drained soil with little summer water for these natives of Mediterranean Europe. Evergreen and frost hardy to 15F, mid USDA zone 8.
Lamiaceae $14 2D

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Phormium - 'Dusky Chief' x 'Emerald Gem' [1st generation]

Xanthorrhoeaceae $14 3D

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Phormium cookianum 'Blondie' New Zealand Flax
A short-growing, weeping New Zealand Flax with green margins and cream-yellow stripes. Height to 2' and width slightly more. Due to its long slender leaves, this cultivar will often swallow its container by reaching way past the soil level. It's a bit like Rod Stewart's hair. Plant in part to full sun; in hot areas, it may appreciate a location in afternoon shade to avoid leaf burn. Regular summer watering. Protect from hard frost, USDA zone 8b.
Xanthorrhoeaceae $15 4D

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Physocarpus opulifolius 'Diablo'
A handsome garden classic, ours first purchased from the famous Western Hills Nursery in 1979 or so. Upright, arching, deciduous shrub, to 8' or more, with deepest burgundy leaves and adorned with white flowers early to mid spring. If pruned into small tree form, the golden flaky bark is visible and attractive. We copice ours every 2-3 years to maintain density (the shrubs, not us). Easy-going, sun or shade. Summer water where dry. USDA zone 5.
Rosaceae $12 3D

Pileostegia viburnoides

Pileostegia viburnoidesclimbing hydrangea
Self-clinging evergreen vine with terminal white flowers in large clusters in late summer to early autumn. Foliage is handsome, the leaves dark green and leathery. For half sun to full shade in fertile, well-drained soil. An excellent candidate to run up that Douglas fir out back, as long as it gets a bit of summer water. (Not recommended on brick as it clings a bit too tightly.) From China and cold hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Hydrangeaceae $12 3D

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Pittosporum bicolor
Small tree, ours collected from the tablelands of Tasmania, though usually grown in gardens as a quite narrow shrub from 6-12' ft. The Italian cypress-like shape is striking enough....but wait, there's more! The 1" leaves, narrow and lightly cupped, are a deep olive-green above with a light gold to silver indumentum beneath, creating wonderful bicolor contrast over the entire shrub. Has performed in gardens in the US Southeast, but by far the most rewarding along maritime West Coast where temperatures rarely dip below USDA zone 8 levels. In colder pockets, place on the lea side of cold drying winds. Provide even summer moisture in sun to dappled shade.
Pittosporaceae $14 3D

Pittosporum heterophyllum

Pittosporum heterophyllumchinese mock orange
This evergreen "mock orange" should be in every shopping center parking lot– it’s that tough. Sadly, it’s not well represented anywhere. Medium shrub to small tree,12 to 15 ft, with glossy, narrow foliage and, in spring, pale yellow, intoxicatingly scented flowers. Delicious! Sun to part shade with regular water. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 7.
Pittosporaceae $14 3D

Pittosporum heterophyllum 'Winter Frost'

Pittosporum heterophyllum 'Winter Frost'variegated chinese mock orange
One of the most frost hardy of the Chinese mock oranges, this form, introduced only a few years ago from Japan, grows to 4 ft or so with 2” leaves margined and streaked most attractively in white and cream. Creamy flowers are scented of orange blossoms in mid spring to early summer. Can be shorn as hedge or used as specimen plants in decently drained soil. Prefers sun to half shade and supplemental summer water where very dry. Easy. Frost hardy to 5F, mid USDA zone 7.
Pittosporaceae $14 3D

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Pittosporum illicioides 'Nappy'
A Cistus introduction. This, one of our newest hybrids, to 8-10' pyramidal in form, with leaves up to 6" long by only 1/2" wide or less, falling gracefully from the whorled branches and producing clouds of pale yellow flowers in spring and occasionally later. Indeed, a dreamy plant. Can be kept as a shrub or pruned into a small tree and encouraged to grow to 10-12'. Full sun to dappled shade with occasional summer water. A very pretty evergreen. USDA zone 7.
Pittosporaceae $14 3D

Pittosporum illicioides 'Strappy'

Pittosporum illicioides 'Strappy'
Too rare in horiticulture. Selected by Sean Hogan from Taiwanese collections by Dan Hinkley - P. illicioides DJHT 99079, chosen for the extremely narrow leaves that present a fine texture in the garden. A tall, evergreen shrub, to 12-15 ft, with fragrant, white flowers in spring and, in autumn, very small, blue-black fruit in orange capsules. Best in light shade with regular summer water. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8, and expected in zone 7.
Pittosporaceae $16 2D

Pittosporum parvilimbum

Pittosporum parvilimbum
A Pittosporum for USDA zone 7! one known to have survived many harsh winters at the JC Raulston Arboretum in North Carolina. Having been introduced there as the completely unrelated Phillyrea, it was only after many years the plant was noticed and properly identified as this recently described and excellent species. From China, a tall, evergreen shrub, to 10-12 ft, densely branched and adorned with small, narrow leaves. Blooms in spring with small, white fragrant flowers followed by tiny, black fruits in orange capsules. Sun to part shade with regular water. A treasure for the Pittosporum-lover’s garden!
Pittosporaceae $16 2D

Pittosporum patulum

Pittosporum patulum
A most unusual member of the genus from New Zealand southern South Island, endemic to only a couple of spots along the Bellcloutha River. Growth is narrow and upright to 8-15' with black, spidery leaves in youth, enlarging only somewhat in adulthood, with more rounded bright green leaves and a multitude of deep maroon flowers said to be the most fragrant of the genus, reminiscent of carnations. This should make a fine new addition to the garden, especially the Goth garden. We have surmised hardiness to zone 8 that has been verified by surviving 12F in winter 2014 in the garden of our super friend Loree, where she and the plant survived the winter unscathed.
Pittosporaceae $14 3D

Pittosporum sahnianum

Pittosporum sahnianum
A hardy pittosporum, the hardiest we know, having withstood winter rigors of -8F, lower USDA zone 6, in North Carolina. And it's handsome, too, an evergreen shrub, to 6-8 ft tall x 4-6 ft wide, with fragrant, pale yellow flowers in spring. Although now placed by some within P. illicioides, we know that our plant, from the JC Raulston Arboretum, is smaller with wider leaves. Summer water in full sun to medium dappled shade and well-drained soil. A pittosporum to enjoy with no worries about weather.
Pittosporaceae $16 3D

Pittosporum tenuifolium

Pittosporum tenuifoliumkohuhu, black matipo
Fabulous unnamed selection of this well behaved, evergreen, New Zealand shrub that can reach 15-20 ft tall x 10-15 ft wide in time. Full to half sun with occasional summer water. once established. Shiny, medium green leaves with wavy, undulating edges are held on dark, nearly black stems, with tiny, dark purple, sweetly fragrant flowers adding magic in spring. Makes a love hedge, easily trimmed to size. Fine in coastal sun, enjoying a bit of afternoon shade inland with regular summer water for best appearance. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Pittosporaceae $12 3D

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Argentea Nana'

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Argentea Nana'
Of the often jewel-like members of this highly selected species from New Zealand, P.t. 'Argentea Nana' is indeed one of the most exquisite. Young plants form mounds, 18" to 2 ft , of densely held, 1/4" leaves on black stems. As plants emerge into their adult phase, the leaves grow farther apart and the plants become more open. This too is attractive but if one misses the old days, a little shearing can never hurt. On older plants late spring flowers are under 1/3", maroon to nearly black with the fragrance of dianthus. Dappled shade to full sun with regular summer water preferred. Exquisite container plant. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Pittosporaceae $16 2D

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Atropurpureum'

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Atropurpureum'purple kohuhu
Though doubtless many purple-leaved forms have been introduced under the name Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Atropurpureum', this one is ours, grown from cuttings of the lovely 12 ft tall x 4 ft wide specimen in the garden of Western Hills Nursery in Northern California. The 1", rounded leaves, yes purple and held among black stems, and carnation-scented, nearly black flowers, might possibly sound morbid but are, in fact, dazzlingly beautiful. Plants, easily kept as a formal element or background hedge in the garden, are easily shorn to maintain even tighter shape. Prefers bright light or only dappled shade with regular summer water in dry climates. This has proven to be one of the frost hardiest cultivars, surviving 7F briefly in the garden at Western Hills in 1990 and having turned not a leaf with a windy 20F in our garden. Frost hardy to at least 10F, USDA zone 8; a container plant or an experiment in zone 7.
Pittosporaceae $16 4D

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'County Park Dwarf'

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'County Park Dwarf'
Introduced by the United Kingdom's famed County Park Nursery, the source of many a wonderful new plant, this is a newer version of a more old fashioned cultivar, Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Tom Thumb'. To 4-5 ft, with a densely mounding habit and 3 in, ever-so-slightly ruffled burgundy leaves adorned with the typical deep purple flowers that are difficult to see amid the foliage but can certainly be found by the fragrance of carnations in early to mid spring. Pittosporum tenuifolium 'County Park Dwarf' has proven several degrees hardier to frost than P. t 'Tom Thumb' and has maintained, at least so far, a somewhat more compact habit in our garden. Regular water; leanish soil; bright light for best color. Fabulous container plant. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 7 if protected from freezing winds.
Pittosporaceae $15 2D

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Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Ebony Giant'
Visually striking and very difficult to find pittosporum cultivar with curly, deep purple-black leaves and a taller growth habit. New growth emerges light green, for a nice contrasting effect. Height to at least 15' and width of 4-6'. Evergreen. Moderate to fast grower, especially with added fertilizer. Excellent against walls or planted as a tall hedge. Frost hardy to USDA zone 8.
Pittosporaceae $15 2D

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Elizabeth'

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Elizabeth'
A southern hemisphere pittosporum from New Zealand, this is a vigorous male cultivar. Small, nearly black flowers provide deliciously fragrant inspiration in spring and the shiny, wavy edged, light blue-green leaves -- variegated with white edges, pink flushed especially in winter -- contrasting with purplish stems provide a nice texture year round. A large shrub to small tree, possibly to 25 ft, but more probably remaining 10-12 ft x 6-8 ft, it can be easily trimmed as a hedge. Enjoying regular summer water, they are best in well-drained soil in sun or part shade, perhaps with extra protection of a south wall or overstory where temperatures dip into the teens regularly. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8, with good protection.
Pittosporaceae $14 2D

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Grey Ghost'

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Grey Ghost'kohuhu
New on the scene, this plant, shared with us by plantsman Luen Miller, has all the terrific attributes of the species and, even better, a very narrow profile, to about 3-4 ft wide to 10 ft or more without pruning. Leaves are narrow and silvery gray (grey…) and early spring flowers are tiny, nearly black bells that look enchanting amonst the silvery foliage. A very nice specimen and a good addition to the hedge or privacy screen possibilities. Bright light for best color and occasional summer water where dry. Also makes a very good pot specimen. Frost hardy to 15F, mid USDA zone 8.
Pittosporaceae $14 2D

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Silver Ruffles'

Pittosporum tenuifolium 'Silver Ruffles'ruffled kohuhu
Small, gray-green, wavy leaves float above black stems on this delicately textured shrub, possibly reaching 12 ft in time. Tiny black flowers appear in spring, stunning against the foliage and highly fragrant as well. Best when backed by darker foliage. Site out of wind and close to a path to be admired. Sun to part sun in hottest climates with some summer water. Frost hardy to at least 10F, USDA zone 8.
Pittosporaceae $16 2D

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Pittosporum tobira 'Florafour'
A vigorous mock orange to 6-8', with robust bright flowers of white. Less orange-tinted than other P. tobiras, these stand out from the dark green foliage and occur mid to late spring, occasionally repeating. Full sun to dappled shade, easily pruned into small tree form. Handsome with such friends as star jasmines, Gardenias, and Daphnes. Enjoy a summer rain every once in awhile. USDA zone 8a, possibly 7b.
$16 4D

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Pittosporum tobira 'Platinum' silver-gray mock orange
A Cistus introduction. A sport occurring in our garden some years ago, this 5-6 ft graceful shrub has leaves to 4", surfaced silver-gray and thinly edged in cream with a hint of green. Typical mock orange flowers in spring, often through summer, creamy white with the fragrance of orange blossom. At its silveriest with afternoon shade in hottest climates. Drought tolerant, though appreciates some summer water. Average soil and fertilizer conditions. A must have for the white garden. Can be shorn or pruned to maintain shape. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Pittosporaceae $016 4D

Pittosporum tobira 'Tall n Tough'

Pittosporum tobira 'Tall n Tough'mock orange
The hardiest of P. tobira clones, this selection is from JC Raulston Arboretum has survived temperatures to 0F without blinking. Large, evergreen shrub to small tree, to 8 ft tall x 6 ft wide, has shiny, dark green, rounded leaves and, in early summer, intensely fragrant, citrus-like, white flowers. Appreciates full sun to part shade, with regular summer water until established. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Pittosporaceae $16 3D

Podocarpus alpinus 'County Park Fire'

Podocarpus alpinus 'County Park Fire'alpine plum yew
OoooH! We think we are becoming quite enamored with these little podocarps. Another down-under plant selected by famed County Park Nursery in the United Kingdom, this jewel-like little conifer, reaches only about 3 ft with densely held, shiny, rounded needles of deepest green/maroon in summer, taking on fiery purple-orange tints in winter, especially in new growth. A fabulous addition to container or garden. The P. alpinus group is one of the most hardy of the genus, this plant having been hardy to close to 0F in several gardens. Stunning when planted with other party goers such as Uncinia rubra and, maybe our favorite, Libertia peregrinans for a rusty contrast. Average soil conditions; bright light best; not appreciative of prolonged drought. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Podocarpaceae $16 4D

Podocarpus lawrencei 'Purple King'

Podocarpus lawrencei 'Purple King'
Spreading shrub to small tree from New Zealand with foliage that turns a very dark purple in winter, lightening a bit in summer. Has very nice red berries. Can be easily hedged, making it a nice alternative to yew or other more commonly used conifers. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 7.
Podocarpaceae $12 4D

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Podocarpus macrophyllus 'Royal Crown'
All the virtues of this long used NW classic from Japan, to 15' or more, with generous 4" needles, these in this case, holding forth with a burst of warm gold with each growth cycle. We have found it to be slightly slower growing than others, but very good lighting for a darker corner of the garden. Summer water, at least on occasion, dappled shade for best effect. USDA zone 8a.
$16 2D

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Podocarpus nivalis snow totara
The hardiest of the podocarps, this alpine ‘totara’ from the mountains of New Zealand’s south island is very much at home in the Pacific Northwest. A small shrub, to 6 ft or so, with dense foliage that shows off bronze highlights in winter. Place out of blazing sun. Cold hardy in USDA zone 7.
Podocarpaceae $14 3D

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Podocarpus nivalis UCSC 75.43 alpine totara
The hardiest of the podocarps, this alpine totara, a Univeristy of California at Santa Cruz collection from Mt. Ruapehu on New Zealand's North Island, is a small, bushy shrub, slow-growing to 3 ft tall and up to 6 ft wide, with dense, needle-like, green foliage that turns an exquisite bronze in winter. Happy growing over walls or banks -- even in containers, in sun to shade where soil is well-drained. Summer drought tolerant once established. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Podocarpaceae $12 3D

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Podocarpus nivalis UCSC 75.44

$14 3D

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Podocarpus nivalis x totara UCSC 90.569

Podocarpaceae $14 2D

Podocarpus salignus

Podocarpus salignuswillowleaf podocarp
One of a number of exquisite and rare conifers from southern Chile, this upright, forest dweller with weeping branches and gracefully hanging foliage looks for all the world like the bamboo you always wanted. Particularly beguiling as it grows in several places with the Chilean native Chusquea culeou, a combination we observed during our first collections in Chile some years ago. Nothofagus and luma are other associates in this moist cool maritime environment. Unlike some other rarities, it has become quite at home in cultivation, adding a graceful subtropical effect in our courtyard and having remained undamaged in temperatures in the low teens F in several gardens. A plant for reasonably moist soil and average fertility, bright light to dappled shade (weeps a bit more in dappled shade). Eventually to 25-30 ft, more reasonably to 15 ft in the garden. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Podocarpaceae $16 2D

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Podocarpus totara 'Pendula' weeping totara
Large, gracefully weeping shrub, easily trained to small tree size, to 8-12 ft tall or so, with yellow-green, densely held needles and dense weeping branches as well, though these can be thinned to enhance the fine, graceful appearance. Easy care, requiring regular but infrequent water in dry summer places and sun for best needle color, though perfectly happy in dappled shade. This New Zealand native seems adaptable to both east and west. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7. Excellent container plants.
Podocarpaceae $15 3D

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Podocarpus totara x nivalis

Podocarpaceae $15 2D

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Podocarpus totara x nivalis UCSC 84.121

Podocarpaceae $16 2D

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Polygonatum odoratum - Suncrest

$15 3D

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Polygonatum odoratum 'Fireworks'
This rare selection of Solomon's Seal is a stunning addition to any shade garden. Found in Japan, this form has bright creamy streaks and splashes down the length of its leaves. The red stems contrast nicely with the bright leaves. Small white bell flowers appear in Spring. Grows 2 feet high and spreads out overtime forming a colony. Shade to part shade. Grow in moist, draining, rich soil. Deciduous perennial. Frost Hardy in USDA zone 6.
$18 4D

Polygonatum odoratum var. pluriflorum 'Jinguji Form'

Polygonatum odoratum var. pluriflorum 'Jinguji Form'red stem solomon's seal
Upright perennial, a Japanese form of the traditional Solomon's seal, this with red stems that create a sharp contrast with the green leaves and spring bell-flowers that dangle from the stem followed by black berry-like fruit. Best in dappled shade to full shade, reaching 20-24" tall in clumps to 2-3 ft wide. Moist, fertile soil is best for beautiful plants standing over a long period. Frost hardy to -30F, at least, USDA zone 4.
Liliaceae / Asparagaceae $15 4D

Polypodium scouleri

Polypodium scoulerievergreen licorice fern
Native to the coastal forest along the immediate Pacific Coast, growing on rocks and atop and among the gnarled branches of ancient redwoods. Our only evergreen licorice fern and an attractive plant in the garden -- even without the ancient trees -- to about 12" tall and slowly spreading. Very good for container, rooftop, or evergreen groundcover. Best where soil is rich and well-drained, in shade inland or sun along the immediate coast. Enjoys some summer moisture but dislikes being too wet. Frost hardy to 10F, zone 8.
Polypodiaceae $12 3D

Prostanthera cuneata

Prostanthera cuneataaustralian mint bush
This little sweetheart from down under came to us via the University of California at Santa Cruz Arboretum. Its dense and fragrant foliage alone is enough reason to grow it, but in midsummer it covers itself in perfect, white, outfacing bells that perfume the air. To 3-4 ft tall in sun to part shade. Prefers well-drained soil and moist conditions. Dislikes sunlight on wet foliage. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Lamiaceae $9 2D

Prostanthera lasianthos

Prostanthera lasianthosvictorian christmas bush
Tall and lush evergreen shrub, the largest of the Australian mint bushes, to 15 ft tall x 7-8 ft wide though easily kept smaller, with dark green, slightly toothed leaves, very minty when brushed or crushed. Lovely fat sprays, of white bell-flowers with purple and orange markings hang from the branches in late spring. Best in full to part sun, protected from winds and difficult winter weather, with regular summer water in driest climates at least until well-established. Frost hardy to the mid teens F, USDA zone 8b.
Lamiaceae $11 4D

Prunus lusitanica 'Variegata'

Prunus lusitanica 'Variegata'Variegated portuguese laurel
A very useful garden accent and an enduring evergreen in a variegated form, the shiny green foliage splashed cream with pink winter highlights. Reddish purple new shoots add to the excitement. Early summer flowers are white and fragrant, producing red fruit that ripens to black. Slow growing, eventually reaching 12 ft or so, this large shrub can easily be pruned to tree form or used as a hedge. Does well in sun to part shade and prefers regular summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.
Rosaceae $12 3D

Pseudopanax discolor - Nelson, NZ

Pseudopanax discolor - Nelson, NZ
Fascinating evergreen aralia from New Zealand, this particular purple-leaved form from serpentine soils in Nelson, South Island, NZ. Shrub to small tree -- to 15' to 20' but easily kept as small as 3' by nipping -- produces palmate leaflets, somewhat fan-shaped, and the deepest green, tinted purple in summer, darkening to a rich purple in cooler periods. Small, sputnik flowers, typical of the Aralia family appear in spring and summer followed by dark berries that add to the plants attractiveness in fall. A plant for moist woodland conditions or a bright garden in parts of the country where summers are not unreasonably warm. Consistent moisture; a little organic matter is a plus but fairly low fertility overall is preferred. Wonderful container plant. Frost hardy in the upper reaches of USDA zone 8; totally reliable in zone 9.
Araliaceae $14 4D

Pyrrosia lingua 'Eboshi' [Contorta]

Pyrrosia lingua 'Eboshi' [Contorta]contorted tongue fern
Intriguing, sloooooow-growing, tongue fern from Japan with evergreen, contorted, (possibly convulsing) fronds, glossy above, pale brown and furry beneath. A plant for a shade rockery or special container. Keep damp. Root hardy in upper USDA zone 7.
Polypodiaceae $16 4D

Pyrrosia sheareri

Pyrrosia shearerishearer's felt fern
This lovely and unusual evergreen fern, not often available, hardly looks like a typical fern at all with its long, narrow and leathery fronds, pea green with silver hairs on the undersides when young and maturing to dark green with rusty brown hairs on the undersides. To only about 30" tall in clumps to 15-18" wide, growing best in rich, well-drained soil in morning sun to shade with summer water. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Polypodiaceae $18 4D

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