Plant Catalog for Mail Order: Fall 2017

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Machilus thunbergii
Another favorite Avocado relative, this with a long history in elite gardens of the coastal Northwest and Southeast. To 20-25', with flattened sprays of branches, and an upright, humble form. The 3-5" shiny, green tinted blue and copper (especially in new growth) leaves can be seen from quite a distance. Superb small garden tree, if provided occasional deep watering, and sun to filtered shade. Southern China. USDA zone 7.
Lauraceae $14 3D

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Magnolia grandiflora 'Bracken's Brown Beauty'
Considered one of the best Southern Magnolia cultivars by many horticulturalists--and also one of the most cold hardy--this one with somewhat narrower leaves, shorter but more numerous branching, and a very dense, erect shape. Backs of the leaves are deep brown, thus the name, and flowers are large, fragrant, and saucer-shaped. Overall, we concur, a very nice selection. Height to 30-50' and width to 15-20'. Full sun with rich, moist soil. Evergreen. Frost hardy to USDA zone 7.
Magnoliaceae $14 4D

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Magnolia grandiflora 'Edith Bogue'
Considered one of the best Southern Magnolias for the Pacific Northwest, this medium to large evergreen Magnolia cultivar displays a broad, spreading habit, lustrous pointed leaves, and large, ivory-white, fragrant flowers that are followed by large, festive seed cones, perfect for the holidays. Slow grower, to 15-18' tall and 10-12' wide. Full to part sun in moist, compost-rich soil. Excellent specimen plant. Frost hardy to USDA zone 7.
Magnoliaceae $14 4D

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Magnolia laevifolia 'Free Spirit'
New for 2013. A most lovely small evergreen, a spreading to strongly weeping form of M. laevifolia with satiny copper colored indumentum on the leaves, stems, and flower buds. Very fragrant white flowers appear from early to late spring and occasionally again in autumn. To 3-4 ft tall and particularly useful planted atop walls, slopes or in containers. Best in sun to part shade with regular summer. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Magnoliaceae $16 4D

Magnolia maudiae

Magnolia maudiaesmiling forest monkey tree
Also known as the "smiling forest lily tree", this is one of the best magnolias to arrive from China, though still not easily available. A member of the michelia group which includes some of the most floriferous of the evergreen magnolias, M. maudiae shows off an abundance of large, white, lemon-scented flowers in early spring, and from an early age -- a perfect contrast to the large, blue-green leaves that remain handsome all year long. Fast-growing, reaching 15-20 ft tall x a somewhat narrow 8-10 ft wide in 10 or so years. A stunning and rewarding tree for sun to part shade with regular summer water. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 7.
Magnoliaceae $22 4D

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Mahonia confusa [very silver]
From a lovely group of Mahonias, these in particular have become favorites. These plants from multiple generations of the most silver-colored specimens, look as if made of platinum, creating a ghostly silver rosette in the garden to about 3' wide or more, the plants over 6' in height. A very nice way to carry silvers into the shade and reflect light. Late autumn flowers of light yellow attract hummingbirds and produce very pretty blue fruit, from which you can produce more silver mahonias! Upper USDA Zone 7, a little afternoon shade in our climate makes them happiest.
Berberidaceae $18 3D

Mahonia eurybracteata 'Soft Caress' PP 20183

Mahonia eurybracteata 'Soft Caress' PP 20183
Selected by plantsman Ozzie Johnson as a particularly silver and more frost hardy form of a most lovely species, this plant to about 4 ft tall with finely divided leaves appearing almost as a delicate palm. For dappled shade to full sun with at least occasional summer water where dry. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8a, though known to have come through an Atlanta, zone 7 winter with only scorching.
Berberidaceae $19 3XD

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Mahonia fortunei chinese mahonia
This Chinese mahonia is elegant in its simplicity. Unbranched stems rise 3 to 4 feet with fern-like compound leaves, the leaflets narrow and green above, more yellow below. Clusters of lemony yellow flowers appear in late fall followed by purple black berries. Spreads slowly. Thrives in shade or sun, prefering more sun in colder climates, and prone to mildew in Pacific Northwest shade. Supplemental summer water in dry areas. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8; root hardy in zone 7 with protection.
Berberidaceae $14 3D

Mahonia gracilipes

Mahonia gracilipes
Peek at the brilliant white leaf undersides and fall in love. This rare, Chinese evergreen mahonia, introduced into western horticulture in 1980 by Roy Lancaster, has graceful, blue-green, compound leaves with surprising white undersides, and, in summer, sprays of pretty, delicate flowers with purple-red petals and ivory interiors. Sturdy and choice. Native to shady limestone cliffs, though it’s quite happy in garden conditions in full sun with moist soil to nearly full shade. Can reach about 6 ft high x 5 ft wide eventually. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Berberidaceae $18 3D

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Mahonia haematocarpus - Santa Fe Landscape Red Barberry
Also commonly known as Desert Holly, this Mahonia bears the familiar - although somewhat daintier - evergreen, prickly leaves and the bright yellow flowers of its cousins but with the notable and welcome attribute of bright red berries. Full to part sun, decent drainage, little summer water once established. Hardy in USDA zones 7-11, down to 0F and heat tolerant. Reaching about 8' x 8', lovely for texture variety in the landscape or a formidable and deterrent border hedge.
$18 2in

Mahonia pinnata ssp. insularis 'Shnilemoon'

Mahonia pinnata ssp. insularis 'Shnilemoon'
From the channel islands off southern California, this form named by the fabulous University of California Santa Cruz Arboretum. Makes a rounded shrub of upright branches with multiply-pinnate leaves, nearly round and the brightest spring green, held on very pretty, rather gracile, deep brown stems. All this adorned with cheery yellow flowers in late winter and spring and blue berries beyond. This is one of the most unique forms of a species native from southern Oregon to Baja. Prefers Mediterranean conditions....sorry Florida. Frost hardy to mid USDA zone 8. Tolerant and pleased with long periods of summer drought in either sun or shade.
Berberidaceae $15 3D

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Mahonia repens SBH 9498

$11 4D

Mahonia x lindsayae 'Cantab'

Mahonia x lindsayae 'Cantab'
Sturdy 5 ft mound of large glossy upright-held leaves. Mid winter fragrant yellow flowers followed by dense blue berries that birds love. Ignored by deer, it prefers full to part sun and normal water. Zone 8
Berberidaceae $18 4in

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Marrubium rotundifolium

Lamiaceae $11 4in

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Melicytus crassifolius UCSC 2007.19 thick-leaved mahoe
A sculptural shrub in the viola family (believe it or not!) from New Zealand. To 3 ft tall or so with small, glossy green leaves on fine-tipped divaricating branches, each stem adorned in sumer with white-pale lavender flowers followed by translucent berries. Good as an architectual specimen, in containers, or planted rock gardens. Enjoys consistent summer water and bright light. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Violaceae $12 3D

Metapanax delavayi

Metapanax delavayidelavay false ginseng
A truly elegant, evergreen aralia relative from Southern China, a shrub to 8-10 ft tall and wide, with finely cut, compound leaves and, in maturity, clusters of white flowers in late summer turning to black berries, winter food for the birds. Best in dappled sun to partial shade in rich, moist soil. Our clone, from the University of Washington Arboretum in Seattle, is frost hardy and undamaged in upper USDA zone 7 and possibly lower. (Synonym: Nothopanax delavayi)
Araliaceae $14 4D

Metapanax delavayi 'Stout'

Metapanax delavayi 'Stout'stout delavay false ginseng
A Cistus introduction. Selected from our seed grown plants, this clone of an already desirable evergreen aralia relative, has rather thickened compound leaves, more schefflera-like than its brethren. A graceful shrub or small tree, these have a sturdy form, maintaining an upright stance. Mature plants produce late summer clusters of white flowers that become black berries providing winter food for the birds. Dappled sun to part shade and rich, moist soil are best. 12ft tall. Frost hardy to upper USDA zone 7 and possibly lower. (The species, until recently, was Nothopanax delavayi.)
Araliaceae $18 4D

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Metrosideros umbellata [Wangaloa] southern rata
This collection from New Zealand's South Island is from one of the colder habitats of one of the most frost hardy of the New Zealand Christmas tree species -- hopefully making these wonderful creatures available to more gardeners. This shrub or small tree grows slowly, eventually reaching 10 or 15 ft or a bit more, with narrow, shiny, bright green leaves and a dense habit, making it a fine garden plant for formality or screen. Mature plants are topped in early summer with bright red, powder puff flowers, magic for bees and hummingbirds. Sun to part shade with regular summer water. As these prefer cooler soils, they are probably not a plant for the US South. We expect these to be fully frost hardy to 15F, mid USDA zone 8, and possibly lower -- let us know. We are very excited to offer this form as we've been looking for hardier southern rata for many years and we think we might have found it.
Myrtaceae $18 2D

Mitraria coccinea - David Mason’s Robust

Mitraria coccinea - David Mason’s Robustchilean mitre flower
South American gesneriad, an evergreen, scrambling shrub or small, interwoven mound with small, dark green leaves and flaming orange-red tubular flowers from late May-July. Requires protection from wind and moist, well-drained soil, rich in humus, in bright light or part shade where roots can remain cool. Easy in USDA zone 9 and tolerates temperatures to 10F, zone 8, in the best locations. Otherwise good in containers with winter protection.
Gesneriaceae $12 3D

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Monardella macrantha 'Marion Sampson'
This selection of native bee balm from Ed Sampson of Mourning Cloak Ranch in Tehachapi, CA, proves to be more vigorous, free-flowering, and disease resistant than the species. To only 3-4" tall and evergreen, these perennials form clumps to over 1' wide with dark green leaves and clusters of large red tubular flowers, a bit of paradise for both hummingbirds and butterflies all summer long. Requires very good drainage and, though drought tolerant, does well with occasional summer water in sun with mulch or in part shade. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Lamiaceae $14 2D

Monardella villosa 'Russian River'

Monardella villosa 'Russian River'coyote mint
Native to California, this form was selected by California Flora Nursery from plants found along the Russian River. A tough and vigorous, shrubby perennial, these grow to 1-2 ft tall in clumps to 2 ft wide, with rounded, minty, gray-green leaves on brittle stems. Spring to summer flowers are fragrant, lavendar-pink magnets for hummingbirds and bees. Full sun and well-drained soil are best where summer water is not provided. Said to be deer resistant AND makes a fine tea. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 7.
Lamiaceae $12 2D

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Morus nigra 'Dwarf Everbearing' DWARF MULBERRY
This dwarf mulberry stays far more compact than the species, to 6' in height and width, though easily kept to 2' with pruning. Produces sweet, medium-sized mulberries in abundance, heaviest in the summer. Full sun, well-drained soil, occasional water. Great as a container plant! USDA zone 7.
Moraceae $16 4D

Muehlenbeckia complexa 'Tricolor'

Muehlenbeckia complexa 'Tricolor'tricolor wire grass
A variegated version of the useful, ground-covering wire grass, the leaves splashed with green, white, and pink on dark, wiry stems to only 6" in height, spreading slowly. Evergreen, forming dense mats in sun to part shade in almost any soil but needing some summer water where particularly dry. Very good around steps or larger specimens such as New Zealand flax. Also successful in containers. Frost hardy to 8F, upper edge of USDA zone 7. Sometimes sold as M. axillaris.
Polygonaceae $11 3D

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Muehlenbeckia ephedroides
From rocky riverbank terraces of New Zealand's south island comes our selection of what looks more like a blue stemmed broom then wire grass. Mounding or spilling to about 18" x well, really wide. Superb container or wall plant. Full to part sun, easy care, but prefers a bit of summer water where dry. Zone 8, probably into 7.
$11 4in

Mukdenia rossii

Mukdenia rossii
Ground-covering perennial, a Heuchera relative from China discovered by the late plantsman, Steve Doonan. Slowly clumping, to 1 ft x 1 ft, in well-drained soil with generous water until established. Quite drought tolerant thereafer. Leaves are a bright, shiny green and the white spring flowers make a nice contrast. Sun to part shade. Frost hardy in USDA zone 4.
Saxifragaceae $9 4D

Muscari macrocarpum 'Wayne's Clone'

Muscari macrocarpum 'Wayne's Clone'
It’s the fragrance! an amazing and rich sweet fragrance that captures everyone who sniffs the flowers of this reasonably rare grape hyacinth selected by our friend Wayne Roderick. Clusters of robust, yellow flowers appear in early spring standing above the grassy foliage that remains evergreen in the upper 20sF. Slowly increases by division of bulbs. Best in well drained soil or in an easily accessible container -- close to paths and close to sniffing level - not to miss the intoxicating scent. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 and possibly into zone 7.
Liliaceae $15 4in

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Myrceugenia [ex suca [Mike Remmick]]
radel 7 taza S +5000 ft
Myrtaceae $14 3D

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Myrtus 'Redside'
A Cistus introduction, a hybrid, between Myrtus communis ‘Compacta’ and M. communis ‘Anne McDonald’, showing compact growth, to only about 20” tall, with attractive, red-tinted stems and densely held leaves, also red-tinted on the undersides. Most useful for small hedges, specimens or topiary. Drought tolerant and free flowering in mid to late spring with white, 1/2 “ flowers. Prefers well-drained, lean soil in full sun. Frost hardy in sun to about 15F, mid USDA zone 8.
Myrtaceae $15 3D

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Myrtus communis ssp. tarentina 'Variegata'
A very hardy form of myrtle. Sturdy and useful compact shrub, evergreen, to 2-3 ft, with narrow, glossy green leaves edged white and pink-tinged white flowers followed by white berries. Best in full sun without too much supplemental water. Leaves are very aromatic and were once considered an aphrodisiac..... Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Myrtaceae $14 2D

Narcissus bulbocodium var. conspicuus

Narcissus bulbocodium var. conspicuushoop petticoat daffodil
Diminutive and tough little daffodil, superbly adapted to dry areas and rock gardens. The 6-12" tufts of chive-like foliage appear in autumn in mild climates with bright yellow, 1" hoops appearing as early as February. In colder climates, foliage appears in February with flowers in early spring. This European native multiplies freely in well-drained soil in sun to a bit of shade. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.
Amaryllidaceae $11 4D

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Nerine 'Blue Flash'
Amaryllis relative from South Africa, this very striking cultivar having leaves with an unusally blue cast and coral flowers with cental blue streak. This form seems to multiply quickly as well. As with others in the genus, these are summer dormant, the flowers emerging "nekked" September - November after which the leaves appear in December and January, remaining through spring. Adapted to dry or wet summers provided good drainage and sun. Should be planted with bulb necks slightly above the ground. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 but may lose leaves in the upper teens F. Add mulch for winter protection.
Amaryllidaceae $16 2D

Nerine 'Coral Cape'

Nerine 'Coral Cape'
Amaryllis relative from South Africa, this one with flowers of deep coral, as the name would suggest. Another striking variety. As with others in the genus, these are summer dormant, the flowers emerging "nekked" September - November after which the leaves appear in December and January, remaining through spring. Adapted to dry or wet summers provided good drainage and sun. Should be planted with bulb necks slightly above the ground. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 but may lose leaves in the upper teens F. Add mulch for winter protection.
Amaryllidaceae $16 3D

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Nerine bowdenii x Amaryllis belladonna
A robust cross between two South Africans, both thriving on the US West Coast, Amaryllis belladonna and Nerine bowdenii. Summer dormant, 3'+ stalks topped with trusses of candy pink flowers, August often into November followed by leaves during the wet season, all disappearing by April or so. Perfect for the dry border, any sunny spot. Great companions for Autumn crocus, Cyclamen, maybe surrounded by a sea of Zauschneria. Reliable in USDA zone 8, mulch in 7. Thrives in any PDX garden.
Amaryllidaceae $15 4D

Nerine humilis - deep pink

Nerine humilis - deep pink
Fabulous floriferous bulbs, these amaryllis relatives from South Africa have masses of rather frilly, deep pink flowers, somewhat more finely textured leaves than others. To 12-14" tall. Summer dormant, the flowers emerging "nekked" September-November after which the leaves appear in December and January, remaining through spring. Adapted to dry or wet summers, provided good drainage and sun. Should be planted with bulb necks slightly above the ground. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 but may lose leaves in the upper teens F. Add mulch for winter protection. A fine container plant.
Amaryllidaceae $8 2D

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Nerine sarniensis 'Antique Rose'
Delightful, deep pink flowered amaryllis relative from eastern South Africa, adapted to dry or wet summers provided good drainage and sun. Summer dormant, the flowers emerging "nekked" September - November after which the leaves appear in December and January, remaining through spring. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 but may lose leaves in the upper teens F. Add mulch for winter protection.
Amaryllidaceae $8 4D

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Nerine sarniensis 'Brilliant'
Delightful rich dark pink flowered amaryllis relative from eastern South Africa, adapted to dry or wet summers provided good drainage and bright sun. Summer dormant, the flowers emerge "nekked" in September-November and leaves appear again in December and January. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8, but may lose leaves in the upper teens F. Add mulch for winter protection.
Amaryllidaceae $14 3D

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Nerine sarniensis 'Mrs. Frances Clarke'
And another charming amaryllis relative from South Africa, this flowers on this one rose with a purplish mid-rib. As with the others, flowers emerge "nekked" in September-November before the leaves emerge as winter rains begin. To 14-18" tall. Adapted to dry or wet summers provided good drainage and sun. Should be planted with bulb necks slightly above the ground. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 but may lose leaves in the upper teens F. Add mulch for winter protection. A fine container plant.
Amaryllidaceae $12 4D

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Nerine sarniensis 'Old Rose' guernset lily
This amaryllis relative from eastern South Africa is very floriferous. Summer dormant, the large, deep rose, lily-like flowers appear alone and "nekked" from September through November followed by the grassy foliage that emerges in December and January growing happily with spring rains before going dormant. Adapted to wet or dry summer provided the soil drains well. Should be planted with bulb necks slightly above the ground. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8, but may lose leaves in the upper teens F. Add mulch for winter protection.
Amaryllidaceae $12 4D

Nerine sarniensis 'Pink Satin'

Nerine sarniensis 'Pink Satin'
Another delightful amaryllis relative from eastern South Africa, this with deep pink, lily-like flowers. Summer dormant, the flowers emerge "nekked" September - November after which the leaves appear in December and January, remaining through spring. Adapted to dry or wet summers provided good drainage and sun. Should be planted with bulb necks slightly above the ground. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8, but may lose leaves in the upper teens F. Add mulch for winter protection.
Amaryllidaceae $14 4in

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Nerine sarniensis var. corusca 'Major'
Shared with us years ago by plantmans Nevin Smith, this robust nerine stands as tall as 18" with 5 or more inch heads of eyecrossing orange flowers that become scarlet tinted with age. Autumn flowering at about the same time the leaves begin to emerge for their winter, as the Mediterranean portion of South Africa. Easy going in cultivation, either in the ground where temperatures don't linger below 20F, USDA zone 9, or in pots that can be pulled into a cool, bright damp place for the winter. In containers, keeping them every so slightly rootbound encourages flowering.
Amaryllidaceae $11 4D

Nerium oleander 'Hardy Pink'

Nerium oleander 'Hardy Pink'
Hardiest of the oleander clones in cultivation with bright pink flowers on an evergreen shrub reaching to 4-6 ft tall. Loves full, blasty sun with little to no supplemental summer water once established. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 and, though the leaves can burn around 14F, mid USDA zone 8, these have resprouted from brief spells in the low, single digits F, zone 7.
Apocynaceae $14 2D

Olea europaea 'Frantoio' - Dole 181
Attractive, large, vigorous plant, to 20 ft+; easily kept smaller. Long weeping shoots & medium to large leaves with sage to silver reflective undersides. The late fruit produces some of the best flavored oil. Best in sun in lean, well-drained soil. Supplemental water to establish; withhold in late summer to harden. Hardy to 0ºF, USDA zone 7, if well ripened.
Oleaceae $18 4D

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Olea europaea 'Nevadillo' - Dole 64
A fine, small member of the vast collection of edible-olive cultivars, this form, with its dark, mid to late season fruit and bushy, upright growth, is grown by us mostly "for external use only," as the silvered leaves are particularly handsome in the garden. Produces by itself but does prefer a friend nearby for best fruit set. It, along with other Spanish olive cultivars, is among the hardiest to frost, root-sprouting in its native plantations to temperatures several degrees below 0ºF -- no damage yet having been seen on the West Coast. Has performed mightily in our Portland garden. For best results plant in full sun with low fertility soil and ensure drought after late August or September to induce dormancy in colder climates. USDA zone 8.
Oleaceae $16 4D

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Olearia nummulariifolia
Stiffly upright little New Zealand daisy shrub with a profusion of small, white, daisy-like flowers. Grown more for its foliage which is evergreen and dense. To 6 ft tall x 4 ft wide in the Pacific Northwest. Sun to part shade. Drought tolerant once established so only occasional summer water for mature plants. Does very well on slopes. Frost hardy to 10 to 15F, USDA low zone 8.
Asteraceae $11 3D

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Ophiopogon 'Golden Zebra'

Liliaceae / Asparagaceae $12 3D

Ophiopogon 'Seiryu'

Ophiopogon 'Seiryu'

Liliaceae / Asparagaceae $12 3D

Ophiopogon japonicus 'Silver Comet'

Ophiopogon japonicus 'Silver Comet'snake beard
Cheerful, evergreen mondo grass with tallish, grassy leaves, to 8" tall or so, green with fine white stripes. Summer flowers are white, echoing the variegation, and followed by blue berries. Spreads slowly by underground rhizomes, making small, bright clumps in part sun with regular summer water. Frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 6.
Liliaceae / Asparagaceae $12 4D

Opuntia 'Cyclops'

Opuntia 'Cyclops'cyclops prickly pear
Though the name has been around a long time, this plant's origins are unclear We do know this is a cute little prickly pear to 1 ft or 18" in height, probably having O. macrorhiza in its ancestry, with rounded pads of 4-6" forming tight clusters with dark bunches of spines appearing as polka dots from a distance. Cheery yellow flowers appear in mid to late spring. Good for container or sunny garden. And, as one would expect, very drought tolerant though west of the Sierra or Cascades would like a drink from the hose once in a while to spur growth. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $15 4D

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Opuntia 'Golden Globe' prickly pear
A Cistus introduction. From one of our favorite cactus habitats not far north of the aptly named Cactus Mountain Oregon, we believe actually named for particularly large specimens of pediocactus growing on its flanks. This selection from an obviously hybrid colony (parents = Opuntia polyacantha x erinacea var. columbiana) has shaggy upright pads to about 5" creating clumps 8-10" high by 3-4 ft wide with densely petalled flowers of undulating gold yellow, the orange stamens combining to create quite a show. Careful drainage is a must with these cliff dwellers and full sun. More summer drought tolerant than other prickly pears. Probably frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $15 4D

Opuntia 'Golden Lion'

Opuntia 'Golden Lion'
This natural hybrid between Opuntia davisii and O. kleinii, found in the Davis mountains of western Texas, creates a small cholla-like shrub to 3 ft with golden spines – rather obnoxious ones at that -- and pea-green flowers that age to yellow. Frost hardy to -20 F, USDA zone 5, and possibly lower with sharp drainage and full sun.
Cactaceae $15 3D

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Opuntia 'Paradox'

Cactaceae $15 4in

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Opuntia 'Peach Chiffon' prickly pear
A wonderful new strain of prickly pear with a profusion of silky, peach colored flowers in June on very compact plants, to under 6" tall forming clumps to 30” wide. n extremely prickly creature for full sun to light shade in well-drained soil. Drought tolerant but happily accepts occasional water. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $15 4D

Opuntia 'Red Gem'

Opuntia 'Red Gem'prickly pear
A gorgeous little prickly pear given to us by Colorado's Kelly Grummons and we could find no better description than this with hopefully enough credit due: "An apparent hybrid between O. basilaris or O. aurea with O. fragilis! To 4" high x 18" wide, with small, round, 2-3" wide pads that have very short spines and are fragile (pads break off easily). The petite, deep pinkish red flowers in June are abundant. Beautiful in the rock garden or in containers. Fergusen thinks this MAY be Opuntia polyacantha v. schweriniana … still a mystery." Frost hardy to -30, USDA Zone 4.
Cactaceae $14 4D

Opuntia aff. columbiana IB 06 - H65

Opuntia aff. columbiana IB 06 - H65
Collected by plantsman Ian Barclay near Naches, WA where the forms of small padded opuntias are numerous and varied. This form has small, flattened, 1" pads producing downward pointed golden spines and pleasing yellow flowers on clumps to 3-4" tall and spreading. We thank Ian for finding this clone; we love it! More tolerant of winter moisture than many other opuntias and a good pot specimen. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4, or below if that is possible.
Cactaceae $14 2D

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Opuntia basilaris ssp. whitneyana SBH 7775b
warm orange glaucids
Cactaceae $15 4D

Opuntia basilaris var. brachyclada - San Bernardino County

Opuntia basilaris var. brachyclada - San Bernardino County
Rare and endangered beavertail prickly pear native to chaparral and oak/pine woodland areas in southern California--this one from San Bernardino County--with blue-gray paddles, short and numerous spines, and huge bright pink cup-shaped flowers in late spring and early summer. Height to 12" and width to 3-4'. Full sun. Little to no water needed. Frost hardy to USDA zone 7.
Cactaceae $16 4in

Opuntia basilaris var. brachyclada 'Mormon Rock'

Opuntia basilaris var. brachyclada 'Mormon Rock'
A Cistus introduction from the vicinity of Mormon Rock in southern California. This tightly clumping small form of beavertail has conical blue pads somewhat more flattened than the typical subspecies indicating a possible hybrid. Whatever the botanical case, each pad is only about 3" wide with well-spaced, bright orange glochids giving the whole plant a very cheery appearance. Nice medium-to-cherry-pink flowers appears in mid spring. Not minding extra winter moisture, these are a bit easier to grow than other beavertails, enjoying full sun. Excellent pot or rock garden plant and frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 5, probably zone 4.
Cactaceae $15 4D

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Opuntia basilaris var. heilii - Type local beavertail cactus
Named for botanist Ken Heil and collected from the northeastern population of the beavertail cactus. This clone, found growing in heavy alkaline soil in south central Utah and collected via a single pad years ago by plantsman Tim Hanis, produces dense clusters of blue-bodied plants, rather short on glochids, a good thing! It has been our favorite so far growing robustly and producing abundant, warm pink flowers in late spring. Easy in in the ground or container provided full sun and good drainage. Frost hardy to at least -30F, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $14 4in

Opuntia echinocarpa SBH 7777

Opuntia echinocarpa SBH 7777wiggin's cholla

Cactaceae $14 2D

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Opuntia erinacea x 'Pink n' White' - Emory County, UT [TH]

Cactaceae $14 4in

Opuntia erinacea x fragilis var. columbiana 'Clarno'

Opuntia erinacea x fragilis var. columbiana 'Clarno'
Particularly attractive form of this lovely native from the painted desert country in Central Oregon. Rounded pads to 3" across bear evenly spaced, golden spines and form clumps to 18" tall. Lean, well-drained soil provides the best site in the garden with little water in summer. Frost hardy to -20F, USDA zone 5, or lower. A good container or rock garden plant.
Cactaceae $11 4D

Opuntia fragilis - dwarf golden

Opuntia fragilis - dwarf goldendwarf brittle prickly pear
Shared with us by friend Panayoti Kelaidis of Denver, this small mat former, quickly to about 3" high x 18" wide and eventually larger, has 1/2" pads with golden glochids and spines. Shy to flower. Very attractive in troughs, pots, or rock gardens, anywhere a low sun angle can can make the golden spines glow. Cactus conditions required -- sun, lean and well-drained soil, and little summer water. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $12 4D

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Opuntia fragilis 'Alberta Sunset'
A Claude Barr introduction many years ago, this diminutive plant from the northern Great Plains grows only to 4-5" to height forming colonies of dense clumps to 18" in diameter over time. With nearly spineless pads and colors beginning warm yellow and aging through colors of the sunset. Fantastic for the rock garden or a small container. Zone 3
Cactaceae $11 3D

Opuntia fragilis 'Little Gray Mound'

Opuntia fragilis 'Little Gray Mound'brittle pricklypear
Very cold hardy little cactus, to only 3" tall in clumps to 12" wide, with brownish red glochids and pads that turn purple in cold weather. Produces bright yellow flowers in early summer. Tolerates part shade but prefers full sun and good drainage; tolerates drought but enjoys occasional summer water. Cold hardy to -35F, USDA 3b. Also fine in containers.
Cactaceae $11 2D

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Opuntia fragilis 'Red Hill'

Cactaceae $11 3D

Opuntia fragilis (debreczyi) var. denuda 'Potato'

Opuntia fragilis (debreczyi) var. denuda 'Potato'potato cactus
This variety of the fragile prickly pear from the western Colorado plateau tends to be almost entirely nekkid, not even having the tiny glochids we've come to enjoy. A favorite of rock and trough gardeners, these have round pads, to under 2", that clump to at least 3 ft wide but only a few inches in height, turning purplish in winter and producing occasional lemon-yellow flowers in mid spring. This clone shared with us by Western Colorado's Don Campbell. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA Zone 4, possibly lower.
Cactaceae $12 2D

Opuntia fragilis var. denudata 'Bronze Beauty'

Opuntia fragilis var. denudata 'Bronze Beauty'marble cactus
This little beauty has small, rounded pads, to only 5" tall, that are dark green, turning reddish-bronze in bright light and cool weather. Forms handsome and colorful clumps to 15" wide with obvious orange glochids but no spines. In late spring to early summer, large, pale yellow flowers appear, turning peachy for their second day. Best in full to light shade and lean, well-drained soil. Drought tolerant but occasional summer water improves appearance. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4. Also known as A. fragilis 'Bronze Beauty.
Cactaceae $11 2D

Opuntia fragilis x 'Duchesne Red'
This probable hybrid from the county of the same name, has chubby little pads about 1 by 2", forming 8 to 10" compact clusters with gray and black spines, prominant red glouchids and light yellow flowers. Easy to grow if given bright light and summer moisture along with well drained soil, excellent in containers. USDA zone 4 at least.
Cactaceae $12 4D

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Opuntia fragilis x erinacea 'San Juan Grey'
A Cistus Introduction. From a diverse hybrid cluster southeast of Moab UT comes this 6" by 18" mound former, distinctly greenish grey pads adorned with short black and grey spines, warm yellow flowers mid spring. Happy in any well drained soil, including rock garden or container if provided full sun. USDA zone 3.
$14 2D

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Opuntia humifusa 'Major'
As the name implies, certainly a particularly large form of this typically creeping prickly pear found throughout the southeastern US. To 4 feet or more in width with 6 inch pads and blunt, golden central spines, making it particularly pretty when backlit. Warm yellow flowers with orange anthers adorn the plant in mid spring and occasionally in summer (when watered) followed by red fruit. Very good container plant or landscape creature. Also one of the best for partial shade. To USDA zone 3
Cactaceae $12 3D

Opuntia humifusa x macrorhiza

Opuntia humifusa x macrorhiza
Visually striking, low-growing wild opuntia hybrid, staying under 6" in height but spreading to 24", with nicely contrasting bright blue-green pads and bright yellow, slightly ruffled flowers with orange-red centers. Full sun. Excellent container specimen in well-drained soil and little to no watering. Frost hardy to USDA zone 6.
Cactaceae $12 4D

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Opuntia leptocaulis 'Barnhart'
A Cistus Introduction: Our collection from central Arizona below the Mogollon Rim several years ago where ranchland meets rocks, this makes a small succulent shrub of cholla-like stems but only about 1/8" wide and adorned with golden spines. A fairly long flowering period of yellow flowers followed by small red fruit, often lasting through much of the year. The whole plant grows to only about 18" in height. Easy to grow in a container. For bright, well drained garden conditions (just watch out for the winter sog). Zone 5
Cactaceae $12 4D

Opuntia macrocentra 'Kunzleri'

Opuntia macrocentra 'Kunzleri'long-spined purplish pricklypear
Named for New Mexico plantsman Horst Kunzler, this short, broad form of a most beautiful prickly pear has bluish pads tinted pink in winter -- each pad at least 6" wide and topped with dark "eyelash" spines -- and yellow, orange-centered flower in mid to late spring. Best with sun and a dryish root run. Frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 6. Fab container plant.
Cactaceae $15 4D

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Opuntia microdasys - large form

Cactaceae $15 4D

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Opuntia polyacantha 'Citrus Punch' prickly pear
Another beautiful prickly pear from Colorado's Kelly Grummons, this spreading creature of under 1 ft in height but eventually to 3-4 ft wide has orange and yellow spines and warm apricot flowers darkening with age. Superb in rock gardens or containers and frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4 or below. Full sun and sharp drainage.
Cactaceae $15 4D

Opuntia polyacantha 'Imnaha Blue'

Opuntia polyacantha 'Imnaha Blue'
A Cistus introduction. A common native of western dry lands, this clone, from northeastern Oregon's Imnaha Canyon, was found weeping several feet off a cliff of red ryolite, the nearly spineless, gray-blue pads appearing almost as if hanging in chains. Assuming not everyone has a cliff, these will form spreading mats to 4-12" tall and up to several feet wide. Early summer flowers are a warm, soft yellow. Ordinary cactus requirements -- sun, lean and well-drained soil, and little or no summer water. Undoubtedly frost hardy into USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $14 4D

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Opuntia polyacantha 'Imnaha Sunset'
A Cistus introduction. A common native of western dry lands, these found in northeastern Oregon's Imnaha Canyon. They have round to oval pads -- from 1-4" long with dense, orange spines (polycantha means "many thorns) up to 2" long -- and form spreading mats to 4-12" tall and up to several feet wide. Early summer flowers are, in this selection, yellow with orange stamens and particularly abundant. Frost hardy at least into USDA zone 4.
Cactaceae $14 4D

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Opuntia polyacantha x - Dechesne, CO

Cactaceae $14 4D

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Opuntia polyacantha x erinacea var. columbiana SBH 7524
Large, 3-4in bluish pads, very twisted spines (few). Warm yellow/orange w/ red stamens. Zone 4
Cactaceae $14 4D

Opuntia potsii var. montana

Opuntia potsii var. montana
A wonderful little cactus from Santa Fe, New Mexico, to only 4" tall x 30" wide, with green pads and very short spines. Summer flowers are lemon yellow, single and simple. Best in lean soil, good drainage, and bright light, though these are more shade tolerant than most opuntias. Needs little to no summer water. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA Zone 4.
Cactaceae $14 3D

Opuntia pusilla - gold spined form

Opuntia pusilla - gold spined formcockspur prickly pear
Diminutive, mat-forming prickly pear from the Gulf Coast to the lower Carolinas, found most often in coastal sand dunes with 2" flattened pads, yellow flowers, and, in this form, golden spines, making a most attractive, fast-growing garden or container plant. Pads easily detach and can be shared purposely or not. Frost hardy in low USDA zone 7, possibly zone 6. Quite moisture tolerant as well.
Cactaceae $14 2D

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Opuntia sp. SBH 9116b - mini pad

Cactaceae $12 3D

Opuntia violacea var. santaritasanta rita prickly pear
Striking, round-padded, miniature tree, to 4-6 ft, this variety from Chochise Country in southeastern Arizona, has pads almost completely round, tinted deep pinky purple especially in winter, and few or no central spines. Flowers are dark yellow ringed with copper. Very good, if not classic container specimen or garden plant in full sun with very well-drained soil and occasional summer water where monsoons don’t hit. Frost hardy to about 0F to –5F, USDA zone 7, if dry.
Cactaceae $015 3D

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Osmanthus fragrans 'Angyo Compacta'
Evergreen shrub from the Himalayas, China and Japan share with us by Ted Stephens, 6-8 ft tall and wide, with shiny green leaves and, in autumn, clusters of small, cream-colored flowers. This cultivar, from the old Angyo nursery district north of Tokyo, is best in part shade in rich moist soil receiving regular summer water. Frost hardy to 5F, mid USDA zone 7b.
Oleaceae $16 4D

Osmanthus heterophyllus 'Ogon'

Osmanthus heterophyllus 'Ogon'golden false holly
Of all the forms now available of this fragrant olive, O. h. ‘Ogon’ is possibly the most striking. These dwarf evergreen shrubs are slow to 4-5 ft and widely pyramidal with leaves a summer chartreuse and remaining gold throughout winter. The flowers are produced like the others, in fall with a sweet, carrying fragrance. Particularly beautiful when massed around contrasting plants such as Mahonia x media ‘Charity’ with its leaves almost matching the Mahonia flowers in winter color and intensity. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 7. Bright light in coastal conditions, dappled shade elsewhere with regular summer water.
Oleaceae $15 4D

Osmanthus heterophyllus 'Rotundifolius'

Osmanthus heterophyllus 'Rotundifolius'
Slow growing and quite showy evergreen shrub with rounded, shiny, dark green foliage -- a very unlikely sweet olive. White flowers in winter, small but intensely fragrant. Reaches 5 x 5 ft or so at maturity in sun to part shade where the soil is rich and receives regular summer water. Can be used for a low hedge. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.
Oleaceae $16 3D

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Oxalis crassipes 'White Pearl'

Oxalidaceae $9 3D

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Oxalis oregana 'Klamath Ruby'
A Cistus Introduction. A native of northern California and southern Oregon; these from a wild collection on the Klamath River. An excellent evergreen ground cover for shade with velvety, evergreen foliage, dark green above with dark red undersides, and large, pale, silk pink flowers. Try it in your deepest dark, dry shade, or in dappled sun with little summer water. Cold hardy in USDA zone 7.
Oxalidaceae $11 4in

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Oxalis spiralis ssp. vulcanicola 'Molten Lava'
Yellow flowers over small, red, green, orange and yellow foliage. Yum! Nice in a hanging basket or as a punch to that tired border. Frost hardy most winters, but take cuttings to be sure. Sun for best color in all but the hottest climates. Summer water. Has gone through 20F, bottom of USDA zone 9.
Oxalidaceae $9 4in

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Ozothamnus ledifolius
A most textural and delightful shrub with waxy green leaves on golden stems. Light yellow puffy flowers in summer. Grows 3ft tall x 5ft wide. Drought tolerant once established. Grow in sun to part sun. USDA zone 7.
asteraceae $12 2D

Parahebe perfoliata

Parahebe perfoliata
Light purple pendant bells all summer carried above handsome grey-green foliage. Tough and dependable in the perennial border or draping over a wall. Sun to part shade, regular water.
Plantaginaceae $12 3D

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Penstemon linarioides 'Mt. Lemon' Toadflax Penstemon
A Cistus introduction. This small species, our collection from the Sta. Catalina Mts. of SE Arizona, to only 6" in height, and twice the width. Delicate, narrow blue-green leaves, lavender flowers in spring, often through autumn, with the entire plant developing a purplish hue through the winter months. Easy to grow for trough, wall, or small-scale garden, given good drainage and not too rich a soil, bright light. USDA zone 5, probably colder.
Scrophulariaceae $14 2D

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Peumus boldus - clone 1
Small, slow growing, evergreen tree from dry sunny slopes in Chile, its wood, bark, and fruit all used widely in traditional medicinal preparations and modern pharmacutical drugs. The aromatic leaves are shiny, 1-2.5”, dark green above and paler beneath; the summer flowers off-white, appearing in clusters; and the fruits (drupes) red -- but, as these are dioecious plants, only set if a suitable friend is nearby. Sun to part sun with little added summer moisture and well-drained soil. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 in a protected location.
Lauraceae $16 3D

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Philadelphus lewisii SBH 6826 Lewis' mock orange
Sean’s collection from Oregon's Deschutes River country of this deliciously fragrant, native mock orange, discovered and named for Meriwether Lewis. A deciduous shrub, to only 4 ft tall and spreading to 8 ft wide with handsome foliage, green above and paler below and, in spring, profuse, single white, intensely fragrant flowers. Shrub to 4 feet, perhaps 8 if super happy. Tolerates sun to part sun, moisture and drought but occasional summer water enhances appearance. Frost hardy to -20F, USDA zone 5.
Hydrangeaceae $12 2D

Phlebodium pseudoaureum

Phlebodium pseudoaureumblue rabbit's foot fern
Once part of a more familiar genus and known as Polypodium areolatum, these ferns are handsome by any name with their evergreen, glaucous gray-blue, deeply lobed fronds to only 12" tall emerging from fuzzy red rhizomes that lie close to the surface. Wonderful in the garden in well-drained, consistently moist soil in part sun to dappled shade. Striking as cut foliage. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Polypodiaceae $16 4D

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Phlomis anatolica 'Lloyd's Variety' Jerusalem Sage
Rugged and useful shrubby perennial with fuzzy stems and on velvety light green, almost gray, leaves. Evergreen. Blooms on this selection are brighter, a flag-yellow, and lightly fragrant reminiscent of cloves. Indeed, all of the Jerusalem sages are proven winners in dry, sunny spaces and on hot, exposed slopes where other plants suffer from higher winds and drought. Height 3-4' and width often more (give them space), creating a soft, mounding appearance. Well-drained soil and light summer watering. Frost hardy to USDA zone 7.
Lamiaceae $12 2D

Phlomis fruticosa

Phlomis fruticosaJerusalem sage
Wooly leaved shrub - to 4 x 4 ft -- the leaves a soft gray on top and white underneath. Whorls of yellow, drapey, slightly fuzzy flowers -- very cheerful -- on upright stems from spring through summer. Full sun to light shade with little summer water for these natives of Mediterranean Europe. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Lamiaceae $12 3D

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Phlomis fruticosa - compact form
Drought tolerant shrub, with furry, wooly leaves gray-blue on top and lighter and brighter beneath. This form smaller and more compact, to only 2-3 ft tall and wide, but with the same cheerful flowers, whorls of yellow, drapey, slightly fuzzy blossoms, on upright stems from spring through summer. Full sun to light shade with little summer water for these natives of Mediterranean Europe. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Lamiaceae $12 2D

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Phlomis monocephala jerusalem sage
Wooly leaved shrub, from Turkey and very much like its close relative P. fruticosa. To 4 ft tall and wide with pale, blue-green, slight fuzzy leaves that take on a coppery fuzz over time and, in spring to early summer, two-lipped, yellow flowers appear on upright stems. Full sun to light shade and well-drained soil with little summer water for these natives of Mediterranean Europe. Evergreen and frost hardy to 15F, mid USDA zone 8.
Lamiaceae $12 2D

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Phormium - 'Dusky Chief' x 'Emerald Gem' [1st generation]

Xanthorrhoeaceae $14 3D

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Phormium cookianum 'Blondie' New Zealand Flax
A short-growing, weeping New Zealand Flax with green margins and cream-yellow stripes. Height to 2' and width slightly more. Due to its long slender leaves, this cultivar will often swallow its container by reaching way past the soil level. It's a bit like Rod Stewart's hair. Plant in part to full sun; in hot areas, it may appreciate a location in afternoon shade to avoid leaf burn. Regular summer watering. Protect from hard frost, USDA zone 8b.
Xanthorrhoeaceae $15 4D

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Physocarpus opulifolius 'Diablo'
A handsome garden classic, ours first purchased from the famous Western Hills Nursery in 1979 or so. Upright, arching, deciduous shrub, to 8' or more, with deepest burgundy leaves and adorned with white flowers early to mid spring. If pruned into small tree form, the golden flaky bark is visible and attractive. We copice ours every 2-3 years to maintain density (the shrubs, not us). Easy-going, sun or shade. Summer water where dry. USDA zone 5.
Rosaceae $12 3D

Pileostegia viburnoides

Pileostegia viburnoidesclimbing hydrangea
Self-clinging evergreen vine with terminal white flowers in large clusters in late summer to early autumn. Foliage is handsome, the leaves dark green and leathery. For half sun to full shade in fertile, well-drained soil. An excellent candidate to run up that Douglas fir out back, as long as it gets a bit of summer water. (Not recommended on brick as it clings a bit too tightly.) From China and cold hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Hydrangeaceae $12 3D

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Pittosporum aff. daphniphylloides DJHT 99111
Dan Hinkley's collection from Taiwan of one of our favorite genera. These can be grown into a large, multi-stemmed shrub or trained as a miniature, single-trunked tree, to 10-12 ft, with lance-like foliage both shiny and beautifully rain tipped. Flowers are small, greenish white, and highly fragrant appearing in mid to late spring and followed by yellow fruit. Best with some summer water in full sun to medium dappled shade and well-drained soil. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Pittosporaceae $14 3D

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Pittosporum bicolor
Small tree, ours collected from the tablelands of Tasmania, though usually grown in gardens as a quite narrow shrub from 6-12' ft. The Italian cypress-like shape is striking enough....but wait, there's more! The 1" leaves, narrow and lightly cupped, are a deep olive-green above with a light gold to silver indumentum beneath, creating wonderful bicolor contrast over the entire shrub. Has performed in gardens in the US Southeast, but by far the most rewarding along maritime West Coast where temperatures rarely dip below USDA zone 8 levels. In colder pockets, place on the lea side of cold drying winds. Provide even summer moisture in sun to dappled shade.
Pittosporaceae $14 3D

Pittosporum heterophyllum 'Winter Frost'

Pittosporum heterophyllum 'Winter Frost'variegated chinese mock orange
One of the most frost hardy of the Chinese mock oranges, this form, introduced only a few years ago from Japan, grows to 4 ft or so with 2” leaves margined and streaked most attractively in white and cream. Creamy flowers are scented of orange blossoms in mid spring to early summer. Can be shorn as hedge or used as specimen plants in decently drained soil. Prefers sun to half shade and supplemental summer water where very dry. Easy. Frost hardy to 5F, mid USDA zone 7.
Pittosporaceae $14 3D

Pittosporum illicioides 'Strappy'

Pittosporum illicioides 'Strappy'
Too rare in horiticulture. Selected by Sean Hogan from Taiwanese collections by Dan Hinkley - P. illicioides DJHT 99079, chosen for the extremely narrow leaves that present a fine texture in the garden. A tall, evergreen shrub, to 12-15 ft, with fragrant, white flowers in spring and, in autumn, very small, blue-black fruit in orange capsules. Best in light shade with regular summer water. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8, and expected in zone 7.
Pittosporaceae $14 3D

Pittosporum patulum

Pittosporum patulum
A most unusual member of the genus from New Zealand southern South Island, endemic to only a couple of spots along the Bellcloutha River. Growth is narrow and upright to 8-15' with black, spidery leaves in youth, enlarging only somewhat in adulthood, with more rounded bright green leaves and a multitude of deep maroon flowers said to be the most fragrant of the genus, reminiscent of carnations. This should make a fine new addition to the garden, especially the Goth garden. We have surmised hardiness to zone 8 that has been verified by surviving 12F in winter 2014 in the garden of our super friend Loree, where she and the plant survived the winter unscathed.
Pittosporaceae $14 3D

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Pittosporum tobira 'Florafour'
A vigorous mock orange to 6-8', with robust bright flowers of white. Less orange-tinted than other P. tobiras, these stand out from the dark green foliage and occur mid to late spring, occasionally repeating. Full sun to dappled shade, easily pruned into small tree form. Handsome with such friends as star jasmines, Gardenias, and Daphnes. Enjoy a summer rain every once in awhile. USDA zone 8a, possibly 7b.
$12 3D

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Pittosporum tobira 'Platinum' silver-gray mock orange
A Cistus introduction. A sport occurring in our garden some years ago, this 5-6 ft graceful shrub has leaves to 4", surfaced silver-gray and thinly edged in cream with a hint of green. Typical mock orange flowers in spring, often through summer, creamy white with the fragrance of orange blossom. At its silveriest with afternoon shade in hottest climates. Drought tolerant, though appreciates some summer water. Average soil and fertilizer conditions. A must have for the white garden. Can be shorn or pruned to maintain shape. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Pittosporaceae $016 3D

Podocarpus lawrencei 'Purple King'

Podocarpus lawrencei 'Purple King'
Spreading shrub to small tree from New Zealand with foliage that turns a very dark purple in winter, lightening a bit in summer. Has very nice red berries. Can be easily hedged, making it a nice alternative to yew or other more commonly used conifers. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 7.
Podocarpaceae $12 4D

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Podocarpus macrophyllus 'Royal Crown'
All the virtues of this long used NW classic from Japan, to 15' or more, with generous 4" needles, these in this case, holding forth with a burst of warm gold with each growth cycle. We have found it to be slightly slower growing than others, but very good lighting for a darker corner of the garden. Summer water, at least on occasion, dappled shade for best effect. USDA zone 8a.
$16 2D

Podocarpus matudae

Podocarpus matudae
From 5200 ft in the Sierra Madre Orientale cloud forest, our collection of this lovely and rare Mexican podocarp, one of the most beautiful hardy conifers for tropical effect. To 20 ft tall or so with weeping branches and a graceful form -- a large textured presence in the garden. Damp soil and dappled shade is best with protection from drying winds. Has tolerated temperatures below 10F, upper USDA zone 7, so far.
Podocarpaceae $19 2D

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Podocarpus nivalis snow totara
The hardiest of the podocarps, this alpine ‘totara’ from the mountains of New Zealand’s south island is very much at home in the Pacific Northwest. A small shrub, to 6 ft or so, with dense foliage that shows off bronze highlights in winter. Place out of blazing sun. Cold hardy in USDA zone 7.
Podocarpaceae $14 3D

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Podocarpus nivalis x totara UCSC 90.569

Podocarpaceae $14 2D

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Podocarpus totara 'Pendula' weeping totara
Large, gracefully weeping shrub, easily trained to small tree size, to 8-12 ft tall or so, with yellow-green, densely held needles and dense weeping branches as well, though these can be thinned to enhance the fine, graceful appearance. Easy care, requiring regular but infrequent water in dry summer places and sun for best needle color, though perfectly happy in dappled shade. This New Zealand native seems adaptable to both east and west. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7. Excellent container plants.
Podocarpaceae $15 3D

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Podocarpus totara x nivalis

Podocarpaceae $15 2D

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Polygonatum biflorum SBH Soloman's seal
A wonderful wildflower, native to the eastern US, with unbranched, upright stems, handsome leaves, and in spring, the great treat -- white flowers dangling down from the arching stems. Spreads by rhizomes to form clusters. To 1-3 ft tall in clumps to 3 ft wide in part shade to full shade with summer water for best appearance. Dies back in winter and returns in all its glory with spring temperatures. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Liliaceae / Asparagaceae $12 4D

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Polygonatum odoratum - Suncrest

$15 4D

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Polygonatum odoratum 'Fireworks'
This rare selection of Solomon's Seal is a stunning addition to any shade garden. Found in Japan, this form has bright creamy streaks and splashes down the length of its leaves. The red stems contrast nicely with the bright leaves. Small white bell flowers appear in Spring. Grows 2 feet high and spreads out overtime forming a colony. Shade to part shade. Grow in moist, draining, rich soil. Deciduous perennial. Frost Hardy in USDA zone 6.
$18 4D

Polygonatum odoratum var. pluriflorum 'Jinguji Form'

Polygonatum odoratum var. pluriflorum 'Jinguji Form'red stem solomon's seal
Upright perennial, a Japanese form of the traditional Solomon's seal, this with red stems that create a sharp contrast with the green leaves and spring bell-flowers that dangle from the stem followed by black berry-like fruit. Best in dappled shade to full shade, reaching 20-24" tall in clumps to 2-3 ft wide. Moist, fertile soil is best for beautiful plants standing over a long period. Frost hardy to -30F, at least, USDA zone 4.
Liliaceae / Asparagaceae $15 4D

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Polygonatum punctatum 'BSWJ 2395'

Liliaceae / Asparagaceae $12 4D

Polypodium scouleri

Polypodium scoulerievergreen licorice fern
Native to the coastal forest along the immediate Pacific Coast, growing on rocks and atop and among the gnarled branches of ancient redwoods. Our only evergreen licorice fern and an attractive plant in the garden -- even without the ancient trees -- to about 12" tall and slowly spreading. Very good for container, rooftop, or evergreen groundcover. Best where soil is rich and well-drained, in shade inland or sun along the immediate coast. Enjoys some summer moisture but dislikes being too wet. Frost hardy to 10F, zone 8.
Polypodiaceae $12 4D

Prostanthera cuneata

Prostanthera cuneataaustralian mint bush
This little sweetheart from down under came to us via the University of California at Santa Cruz Arboretum. Its dense and fragrant foliage alone is enough reason to grow it, but in midsummer it covers itself in perfect, white, outfacing bells that perfume the air. To 3-4 ft tall in sun to part shade. Prefers well-drained soil and moist conditions. Dislikes sunlight on wet foliage. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Lamiaceae $9 2D

Prunus lusitanica 'Variegata'

Prunus lusitanica 'Variegata'Variegated portuguese laurel
A very useful garden accent and an enduring evergreen in a variegated form, the shiny green foliage splashed cream with pink winter highlights. Reddish purple new shoots add to the excitement. Early summer flowers are white and fragrant, producing red fruit that ripens to black. Slow growing, eventually reaching 12 ft or so, this large shrub can easily be pruned to tree form or used as a hedge. Does well in In sun to part shade and prefers regular summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.
Rosaceae $12 2D

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Punica granatum 'Nana Plena' dwarf pomegranate
Dwarf, double-flowered pomegranate, to only 3 ft tall or so, with leaves smaller than the species and small, but spectacular, double flowers
Lythraceae $12 3D

Pyrrosia sheareri

Pyrrosia shearerishearer's felt fern
This lovely and unusual evergreen fern, not often available, hardly looks like a typical fern at all with its long, narrow and leathery fronds, pea green with silver hairs on the undersides when young and maturing to dark green with rusty brown hairs on the undersides. To only about 30" tall in clumps to 15-18" wide, growing best in rich, well-drained soil in morning sun to shade with summer water. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Polypodiaceae $18 4D

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