Retail Availability - Spring 2014: GRASSES

 

Running list for 2014 as of May 27 - please check for current availability

 


Acorus gramineus 'Masamune'
Anemanthele lessoniana
Carex elata 'Aurea'
Carex flagellifera
Carex obnupta
Carex phyllocephala 'Sparkler'
Carex platyphylla 'Blue Satin'
Carex testacea
Chlorophytum 'Gold Nugget'
Chondropetalum tectorum
Cortaderia fulvida
Cortaderia richardii
Elegia capensis
Eragrostis elliottii
Festuca glauca 'Elijah Blue'
Festuca glauca 'Festina'
Hedera canariensis 'Variegata'
Imperata cylindrica
Isolepis cernua 'Live Wire'
Libertia peregrinans 'Gold Leaf'
Liriope muscari 'Pee Dee Gold Ingot'
Milium effusum 'Aureum'
Miscanthus sinensis 'Morning Light'
Nolina 'La Siberica' [D07-64]
Nolina microcarpa
Nolina texana
Ophiopogon clarkei
Ophiopogon jaburan
Ophiopogon japonicus 'Silver Comet'
Ophiopogon planiscapus 'Nigrescens''
Phormium 'Jack Spratt'
Phormium cookianum
Restio tetraphyllus
Rhodocoma capensis
Sisyrinchium striatum 'Aunt May'
Stipa tenuissima
Uncinia rubra
Uncinia rubra 'Belindas Find'
Xerophyllum tenax

Acorus gramineus 'Masamune'

Acorus gramineus 'Masamune'dwarf sweet flag
A very old Japanese cultivar, a true dwarf used mainly in bonsai work, but equally at home in the garden where clumps of grassy foliage in variegations of green and white can reach 6" tall. Slowly spreads in part shade to shade where moisture is consistent. Even tolerates shallow standing water. Also can be tucked here and there to hide the cracks. Frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 6.
Acoraceae

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Anemanthele lessoniana pheasant grass
Cool evergreen Australian grass that turns a glowing orange in the winter, fading to a orangish-spring green in summer. Full to half sun with occasional water. This grass is all about texture and highlighting the garden with warm earthy tones. Think backlit by the sun or spilling out near a sidewalk edge. Cold hardy to 5 degrees F, mid USDA zone 7.
Poaceae

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Carex elata 'Aurea' bowles' golden sedge
This golden-edged, medium sized, deciduous sedge is a bright, glowing spot in any border. A clumping grass, to 18-30" tall and wide, blooming in late spring. Easy to grow in part to full shade with lots of water, even shallow standing water. Easily moved and divided as well. Frost hardy to -20F, USDA zone 5.
Cyperaceae

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Carex flagellifera
When only the true touch of bronze will do... Wispy, 18" foliage on this everbrown New Zealand sedge. Full to part sun, normal summer water. Clumping.
Cyperaceae

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Carex obnupta slough sedge
Water-loving sedge for full sun to partial shade in moist soil or even in standing water. Grassy leaves are evergreen, growing in small bunches and spreading by underground rhizomes to form large clumps. Flower spikes are purplish black and stand above the leaves in April-July. Great for erosion control in damp places. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6.
Cyperaceae

Carex phyllocephala 'Sparkler'

Carex phyllocephala 'Sparkler'palm sedge
Tony Avent describes these as tiny variegated palm trees, but you might get the picture. This evergreen, variegated sedge is best on a moist site and out of the blasty sun. To 12-15" high with mini-papryus-like foliage. Handsome in the woodland garden and stunning in a container. From Japan and frost hardy in upper USDA zone 7.
Cyperaceae

Carex platyphylla 'Blue Satin'

Carex platyphylla 'Blue Satin'
A wonderful introduction by Woodlanders Nursery and related to Carex plantaginea. Though frost hardy below USDA zone 5, above zone 7 it remains evergreen with iridescent blue-green leaves glowing in even the deepest of shade. A great contrast to yellows in the garden. Regular moisture, full shade to dappled sun. Cut back in early spring to renew growth.
Cyperaceae

Carex testacea

Carex testacea
Graceful, frost hardy, ever-orange sedge from New Zealand to brighten the garden year round. Best in half sun with regular summer moisture. Do not cut back in winter or spring – it will look like a very bad hair day for quite some time. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6 or lower.
Cyperaceae

Chlorophytum 'Gold Nugget'

Chlorophytum 'Gold Nugget'gold nugget spider plant
From the Drakensburgs of eastern South Africa and shared with us by plantsman Gary Hammer, this is essentially a dwarf, variegated, ground-covery spider plant -- with no macramé hangers needed. (Does anyone remember macramé?) Has been a wonderful addition to container plantings for us with its 6", light cream and green striped leaves and has been hardy in the ground, frosting back only when temperatures drop to 20F, USDA zone 9, though we would recommend a mulch with such temperatures. Even summer moisture; bright light to fairly deep shade. Decent drainage best.
Asparagaceae

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Chondropetalum tectorum
This stunning South African restio has arching, evergreen foliage, wispy on reed-like stems to 3-5 ft or so, with brown flowers appearing on the stem tipes. Very striking and useful as an accent in the garden, but truly shines in a container. Though the native habitat is wet, these accept both drenched and dry conditions once established. Full to part sun. Protect at 20F, the bottom of USDA zone 9.
Restionaceae

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Cortaderia fulvida mountain toetoe grass
Particularly handsome, smaller toetoe to 4 ft x 4 ft, a New Zealand grass closely related to pampas grass. Flowers are tawny white plumes, feathery and slightly arching, appearing in July and August, earlier than the pampas forms, and standing up to 7 ft tall. Broad, grassy, arching leaves, somewhat more refined than other toetoe forms, develop substantial clumps, or tussocks, in sun to part shade. Best in well-drained soil with regular summer moisture but tolerant of some summer drought. Said to be deer resistant. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Poaceae

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Cortaderia richardii toetoe grass
One of the most attractive of the large grasses, these New Zealand natives form clumps, to over 6 ft tall, of arching, sharp-edged green leaves topped in summer with nodding plumes of creamy white flowers that last well into winter on stalks to 12 ft. Handsome in the background or as a specimen plant in the garden. Tolerates wind, pollution and, it is said, deer as well. Sun to part shade. A bit drought tolerant but prefers moist soils. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8, possibly 7.
Poaceae

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Elegia capensis fountain rush
From the Cape of Good Hope region, S. Africa. Tall, 7-10 ft, spectacular, upright stems, and clusters of fine secondary stems in fluffy masses at nodes. Plant is 3-7 ft wide with flowers borne in large clusters. Lasts for weeks as cut foliage. Frost hardy in USDA zones 8b-11.
Restionaceae

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Eragrostis elliottii blue love grass
A stunning, low clumping, blue-green grass with fluffy white flowers in summertime atop 3' stalks. Foliage to about 18". The plumes sway in the breeze adding a nice effect and last into fall. Full sun best. Regular summer water is encouraged as this grass is native to wet, brackish soils. Best planted in mass as a groundcover or amid wildflower plantings. Hardy to USDA zone 6.
Poaceae

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Festuca glauca 'Elijah Blue'
Fine textured blue buns of grass, to only 1 ft tall and as wide, for bright sun and well-drained soil. Drought tolerant once established. Trim back to 3-4" in spring for renewed growth and color. Evergreen in Portland. A good ground cover in the dry garden with clumps planted close for best effect. Frost hardy in USDA zone 4.
Poaceae

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Festuca glauca 'Festina' blue fescue
A very useful little clumper for the xeric garden, a sunny border, containers, etc. with finely textured, steely blue foliage which sets off its neighboring plants and also looks good all on its own. And it’s easy! In fall, pale green flower stems emerge and then turn a lovely, soft tan color. Plant in full to part sun in well-drained soil. Prune slightly every year to encourage new growth and divide as needed. Height 12-18" and 10-15" in width. Hardy to -30 F, USDA zone 4.
Poaceae

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Hedera canariensis 'Variegata' variegated algerian ivy
A "good" ivy! With all the suspicions surrounding the genus hedera in our part of the world, there are several species -- quite aside from the offending H. helix -- that have no proven desire to spread to our wildlands. Hedera canariensis is one. A bold foliage, the leaves, to over 6" are heart-shaped and cream-streaked, the variegation becoming tinted pink in cold weather. For ground cover or trellis, a bold texture for the subtropical garden. Drought tolerant though thrives with summer water. For full sun to shade in nearly any drainage. Frost hardy in mid to upper USDA zone 7.
Araliaceae

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Imperata cylindrica japanese blood grass
Ornamental, perennial grass, to 12-18" tall, the tops turning deep red in summer, darkening to burgundy over time. Forms clumps to 12" wide creating a bright spot in the garden until going dormant in late fall. Especially lovely when back-lit. Likes well drained soil and moist conditions in part shade or full sun for best color. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.
Poaceae

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Isolepis cernua 'Live Wire' live wire fiber optic grass
Grass-like plant with thin blades, up to 12" tall in a clump to 18-20" wide, growing upright then draping nicely over walls or in containers. Tiny white balls at the tops of stems are actually flowers and add interest to this unusual and charming creature. Regular summer water; more for sunny locations and less for part shade. Tender perennial, frost hardy to 28F, upper USDA zone 9, so best in a pot to bring inside for wintry weather.
Cyperaceae

Libertia peregrinans 'Gold Leaf'

Libertia peregrinans 'Gold Leaf'orange new zealand iris
Introduced from New Zealand in about 2006 this evergreen “flag” makes spreading clumps of plants, to 18” tall, with dainty, iris-like foliage tinted a golden-orange that is more intense in winter. Slightly lean soil and bright light for best color. White spring flowers produce clusters of black fruit, attractive against the foliage. Able to withstand wet soil and all but severe drought. Another good container specimen and/or knitter. Frost hardy to 0F, the low end of USDA zone 8.
Iridaceae

Liriope muscari 'Pee Dee Gold Ingot'

Liriope muscari 'Pee Dee Gold Ingot'golden lily turf
This golden-foliaged monkey grass, from the highlands of Kentucky, can take a bit of shade and still flower just like the regular green one, producing purple clusters in midsummer, a great contrast with the chartreuse foliage. Accepts half sun to full shade, growing to 12” or so. Useful as edging or in a container. Be the first on the block with this stunner. Frost hardy to USDA zone 6.
Liliaceae

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Milium effusum 'Aureum'
Bright, grassy foliage for a shady, moist spot, emerges bright yellow in spring and ages to cheerful chartreuse. To about 1 ft high x 1 ft wide in the shady garden, they need regular summer summer water in rich soil. Frost hardy to -25F, mid USDA zone 5.
Poaceae

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Miscanthus sinensis 'Morning Light' eulalia
A reasonably well behaved Miscanthus with narrow foliage that is finely variegated with white on the margins, the overall appearance becoming silvery. Excellent backlit by morning (or evening) sun. Slow growing, eventually forming clumps to 4-6 ft tall in bright light, full to part sun, with coppery red flowers in September, appearing above the foliage and turning to long-lasting white plumes with seeds. Prefers moist soil and regular summer water. Frost hardy to -20, USDA zone 5.
Poaceae

Nolina 'La Siberica' [D07-64]

Nolina 'La Siberica' [D07-64]
A Cistus introduction. Selected from seed collected at 8000 ft, in La Siberica, Mexico, this handsome plant, a symmetrical fountain of long, graceful, flowing leaves, eventually develops a trunk up to 6 ft tall. Definitely attracts attention in the Cistus garden. Enjoys full sun and requires very little summer water. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Agavaceae

Nolina microcarpa

Nolina microcarpasacahuista, sawgrass, beargrass
Smallish clumping sotol. Three foot long narrow leaves form a dense evergreen mound. White flowers held well above foliage in summer. Full sun, a little summer water. Good drainage.
Agavaceae

Nolina texana

Nolina texanatexas sacahuista
A bigger, bolder version of the somewhat more common and varied N. microcarpa. This Texas native grows to a bold textured 5 ft with deep green arching leaves and creamy white flower spikes rising to 8 ft or more in spring and summer. Exceedingly drought tolerant but a little summer water would increase its growth rate. Sun to dappled shade. Frost hardy to about 0F, USDA zone 7, or even a little below.
Agavaceae

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Ophiopogon clarkei narrow-leaved monkey grass
A much more gracile form of monkey grass with green, grassy foliage up to 10” tall. This slowly spreading, Chinese evergreen is perfect for a shady nook. White flowers blushed pink and metallic royal blue berries. Very striking. Prefers regular summer water, but surprisingly drought tolerant as well. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Liliaceae / Asparagaceae

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Ophiopogon jaburan white dragon lilyturf
Lovely, variegated lilyturf, a Japanese native with white-striped, green leaves adding texture to the garden as a ground cover or specimen. Leaves can be as long as 2 ft forming clumps to 1 ft in diameters and spreading by underground rhizomes. Later summer flowers add color with clusters of purple-blue flowers on 6" stems. Full to part sun with regular summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.
Liliaceae / Asparagaceae

Ophiopogon japonicus 'Silver Comet'

Ophiopogon japonicus 'Silver Comet'snake beard
Cheerful, evergreen mondo grass with tallish, grassy leaves, to 8" tall or so, green with fine white stripes. Summer flowers are white, echoing the variegation, and followed by blue berries. Spreads slowly by underground rhizomes, making small, bright clumps in part sun with regular summer water. Frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 6.
Liliaceae / Asparagaceae

Ophiopogon planiscapus 'Nigrescens''

Ophiopogon planiscapus 'Nigrescens''black mondo grass
Purples and black in the garden have become the new beige, dark colors being the perfect contrast and background for just about anything. This small lily relative grows only to about 6" in height, spreading contentedly if given plenty of moisture. The black, evergreen leaves and small lilac flowers make any brightly colored object stand out and look wonderful with your new Goth look -- white powdered makeup not included. Full sun to deep shade; a bit slow growing either way. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 6.
Liliaceae / Asparagaceae

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Phormium 'Jack Spratt'
An old cultivar that has proven to be extremely tough in the Pacific Northwest. To only 18"-2 ft tall, with dark reddish leaves that are a bit twisted, this phormium can be a workhorse in your garden, in large plantings, or in containers. Accepts full to part sun and, though somewhat drought tolerant prefers regular summer water. Should have reasonable drainage as well. Frost hardy to 15F, USDA zone 8b, but may resprout from lower temperatures if protected.
Xanthorrhoeaceae

Phormium cookianum

Phormium cookianummountain flax
Green phormium, lushly green with no stripes or color interruptions on the gracefully arching leaves, to 2.5" wide in clumps to 4-5 ft tall. Stalks of yellow-orange flowers stand above the foliage in late spring / early summer followed by fruit in the form of attractive, long, black pods. Good in sun or shade -- in sun with regularly summer water in the inland garden, or shade with lower water requirements as in coastal sun. Not often offered, the are lovely and gracious plants. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8 with mulch for protection against freezing.
Xanthorrhoeaceae

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Restio tetraphyllus tassel cord rush
This little Tasmanian devil is sweeeeeet. Stiffly erect spring green stems are capped (if it’s a girl) with architectural bronze seed heads. Boys are a bit less stunning. Though varying greatly in elevation where native, this seems to be one of the frost hardiest restios, often thriving in USDA zone 7, it’s a no brainer for USDA zone 8 and above. Full to part sun. Doesn't mind wet feet, otherwise water periodically where dry. Fabulous container plant.
Restionaceae

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Rhodocoma capensis
Looks for all the world like Elegia capensis but this creature has never had a shred of damage for us. Plumes of asparagus-like foliage, to 4-5 ft and eventually even larger, produce cleverly coordinated rust-brown bracts and seed heads in winter. These are excellent garden plants in well-drained soil with bright light and they make wonderfully architectural container plants. Though somewhat drought resistant, they can also sit in water for an extended period. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8a.
Restionaceae

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Sisyrinchium striatum 'Aunt May' variegated yellow-eyed grass
This gorgeous iris relative is coveted by collectors and it's easy to see why. Aunt May behaves herself in the garden unlike the rest of that side of the family. With mostly evergreen, creamy variegated foliage with dainty yellow flowers in mid summer this is a clumper that spreads out slowly. Nice accent, border, or wall plant. Stands out in any container combination. Easy and frost hardy to mid USDA zone 8.
Iridaceae

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Stipa tenuissima Feather grass
The feathery seed heads on this bright green tall grass, to 2 ft, make a delicate texture. Summer blooming, this is a clumping grass for full sun and well-drained soil. Useful in dried flower arrangements. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.
Poaceae

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Uncinia rubra red hook sedge
Ever-red, clumping sedge. Slow growing, to 12" tall x 15" wide and best used in the garden in combination with yellow or light green foliaged plants. For full sun to part shade with regular water in summer. Seed heads can get caught in fur -- both animal and people -- and are best removed. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Cyperaceae

Uncinia rubra 'Belindas Find'

Uncinia rubra 'Belindas Find'belinda's hook sedge
One of the bright, clumping sedges, this with bronze leaves variegated with striking. bright red coloration. Slow growing, to 12" tall x 15" wide and best used in the garden in combination with yellow or light green foliaged plants. For full sun to part shade with regular water in summer. Seed heads can get caught in fur -- both animal and people -- and are best removed. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Cyperaceae

Xerophyllum tenax

Xerophyllum tenaxbear grass
A grass-like, evergreen perennial, native to the western states and once used in basket-making. Leaves are grassy and flowers are not -- spectacularly so. Rather they are fluffy plumes of white standing above the foliage on stems to 4 ft tall. Gorgeous in a large grouping. Happy in well-drained soil in sun to part shade and drought tolerant once established. Frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 6.
Melanthiaceae

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