Retail Availability - Spring 2013: Bulbs, Ferns, Palms, Cycads, Carnivorous Plants, Annuals, etc.

 

Running list for 2013 as of May 1st - please check for current availability

 


Acoelorrhaphe wrightii1g @ $22
Adiantum venustum4D @ $9
Agapanthus 'Midnight Blue'1g @ $15
Agapanthus 'Tinkerbell'6in @ $11
Agapanthus 'Winter Dwarf'6in @ $11
Agapanthus inapertus ssp. pendulus 'Graskop'6in @ $18
Alstroemeria 'Glory of the Andes'6in @ $9
Alstroemeria psittacina 'Variegata'4in @ $7, 6in @ $11
Amorphophallus konjac6in @ $9
Arachniodes standishii4D @ $14
Araucaria araucana4D @ $18
Arisaema taiwanense4D @ $18
Arum palaestinum6in @ $9
Asplenium scolopendrium6in @ $12
Athrotaxis cupressoides1g @ $24
Athrotaxis laxifolia2g @ $28
Austrocedrus chilensis [Cañon Infernillo, Chile]2g @ $32
Austrocedrus chilensis RCH 4762g @ $24
Billbergia nutans 'Blondie'6in @ $16
Brahea armata2g @ $28
Brahea decumbens1g @ $26
Bulbine frutescens1g @ $14
Butia capitata1g @ $24, 5g @ $55, 15g @ $325
Canna 'Futurity Red'1g @ $12
Canna 'Intrigue'1g @ $14
Canna 'Musifolia'2g @ $26
Canna warszewiczii1g @ $17
Cephalotaxus harringtonia 'Fastigata'1g @ $14
Chamaecyparis lawsoniana 'Van Pelt's Blue'2g @ $1
Chamaecyparis pisifera 'Filifera Aurea'1g @ $14
Chamaecyparis pisifera 'Tsukumo'1g @ $17
Chamaecyparis thyoides 'Glauca Pendula'1g @ $18, 2g @ $32
Chamaedorea radicalis5g @ $47
Chamaerops humilis6D @ $22, 5g @ $47, 15g @ $175
Chamaerops humilis var. cerifera - blue form2g @ $28, 5g @ $47, 15g @ $175
Crinum bulbispermum1g @ $14
Cryptomeria japonica 'Dacrydioides'2g @ $28, 5g @ $55
Cunninghamia lanceolata 'Glauca'10g @ $145
Cunninghamia lanceolata 'Greer’s Dwarf'5g @ $47
Cupressus arizonica 'Taylors Silver'5g @ $47
Cupressus arizonica var. glabra 'Blue Ice'1g @ $14, 2g @ $28
Cupressus arizonica var. montana 'San Pedro Centennial'2g @ $32
Cupressus bakeri5g @ $52
Cupressus chengiana var. kansouensis UCSC 91-8995g @ $52
Cupressus macrocarpa 'Citriodora'2g @ $24
Cupressus macrocarpa 'Wilma Goldcrest'4in @ $11
Cupressus sempervirens 'Glauca'5g @ $47, 15g @ $195
Cupressus sempervirens 'Skinny Princess'4in @ $11, 6in @ $16
Cupressus sempervirens 'Swaine's Golden'2g @ $28
Cyathea cooperi7g @ $65
Cycas revoluta5g @ $67, 15g @ $1400
Cyclamen coum - silver form2in @ $5
Cyrtomium falcatum 'Rochfordianum'1g @ $15
Dahlia 'Fascination'4D @ $9
Dicksonia antarctica1g @ $18
Dryopteris erythrosora 'Brilliance'1g @ $15
Dryopteris uniformis 'Cristata'6in @ $12
Eucomis 'Toffee'1g @ $11
Eucomis comosa 'Maroon Margin'1g @ $12
Eucomis comosa 'Oakhurst'1g @ $12
Eucomis comosa 'Tugela Ruby'6in @ $12
Eucomis pallidiflora ssp. pole-evansii6in @ $12
Eucomis vandermerwei4in @ $7
Haemanthus albiflos - dwarf form6in @ $14
Haemanthus humilis ssp. hirsutus4D @ $9
Hermodactylus tuberosus4in @ $9
Hesperaloe funifera x parviflora5g @ $57
Hesperaloe parviflora - yellow flowered5g @ $47
Ipheion uniflorum 'Charlotte Bishop'4D @ $7
Ipheion uniflorum 'Froyle Mill'4in @ $5
Ipheion uniflorum 'Rolf Fiedler'4in @ $8
Jubaea chilensis - seed: CA3g @ $37, 5g @ $85, 15g @ $285
Jubaea chilensis - seed: Chile5g @ $85, 15g @ $285
Jubaeopsis caffra5g @ $55
Juniperus scopulorum 'Moonglow'7g @ $57
Lycoris chinensis - yellow4D @ $11
Manfreda 'Macho Mocha'1g @ $12
Microbiota decussata1g @ $11, 2g @ $7
Musa basjoo5g @ $42
Narcissus bulbocodium var. conspicuus4in @ $7
Narcissus sp. [China Doll Narcissus]6in @ $11
Nerine 'Blue Flash'4D @ $12
Nerine 'Coral Cape'4D @ $12
Oxalis 'Ruby Slippers'4in @ $8
Oxalis oregana 'Klamath Ruby'1g @ $12
Phlebodium pseudoaureum1g @ $14
Pinus contorta var. contorta4D @ $12
Pinus edulis1g @ $16
Pinus eldarica7g @ $57
Pinus ponderosa - Willamette Valley Collection1g @ $16
Pinus sabiniana - OR State2g @ $28
Platycerium bifurcatum 'Netherlands'4D @ $9
Podocarpus alpinus 'County Park Fire'1g @ $16
Podocarpus alpinus 'Red Tip'1g @ $15
Podocarpus nivalis 'Otari'6in @ $14
Podocarpus salignus2g @ $24
Polianthes tuberosa 'The Pearl'6in @ $12
Polypodium guttatum6in @ $12
Polypodium vulgare 'Bifido Multifidum'1g @ $15
Polystichum setiferum 'Congestum Cristatum'6in @ $12
Pseudotsuga menziesii 'Idaho Weeping'5g @ $65
Pyrrosia hastata2g @ $28
Pyrrosia lingua1g @ $16
Pyrrosia lingua 'Variegata'1g @ $18
Pyrrosia sheareri4D @ $15
Rhapidophyllum hystrix2g @ , 15g @ $125
Rhodohypoxis baurii 'Pintado'4D @ $9
Rhodohypoxis baurii 'Venetia'4D @ $8
Rhodohypoxis baurii var. platypetala4D @ $8
Rhopalostylis sapida5g @ $47
Sabal minor - OK collection2g @ $28, 5g @ $47
Sabal x - Birmingham group6D @ $18
Saxegothaea conspicua1g @ $15
Taxodium distichum 'Pendens'2g @ $37
Taxodium distichum var. imbricatum15g @ $125
Taxodium mucronatum - historic New Mexico population2g @ $26
Taxus baccata 'Fastigiata Aurea'1g @ $14, 3g @ $42, 5g @ $57
Trachycarpus fortunei15g @ $225, box @ $595
Trachycarpus fortunei - precocious fruiting form5g @ $57
Trachycarpus fortunei - Raleigh strain7g @ $85
Trachycarpus latisectus7g @ $95, 15g @ $175
Trachycarpus martianus - Khasia Hills Form1g @ $22
Trachycarpus takil15g @ $195
Trachycarpus takil - cultivated strain25g @ $325
Trachycarpus wagnerianus6in @ $19, 2g @ $37
Trillium kurabayashii - Oak Flats, Chetko River, OR4D @ $18
Tsuga mertensiana2g @ $27
Typhonium venosum1g @ $12
x Amarygia parkeri ‘Hathor’2g @ $28
Zantedeschia aethiopica 'Hercules'4D @ $12, 3g @ $38

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Acoelorrhaphe wrightii silver saw palm
Clumping palm, to 30 ft tall at maturity, with leaves that are green above and silver beneath. Can make a hedge or barrier if suckers are allowed to grow to form a thicket. Best in full sun and lots of heat -- think south wall -- with some summer water. Tolerates very wet areas. Frost hardy to the low teens, lower USDA zone 8.
Arecaceae 1g @ $22

Adiantum venustum

Adiantum venustumhimalayan maidenhair fern
Striking maidenhair fern with lacy foliage that emerges bronzy pink and ages to a gentle green that stands out again the black stems. To only 6” tall, spreading slowly by underground rhizomes to form a clump up to 3 ft across. Light shade with plentiful moisture is best and encourages faster growth. Evergreen to the mid teens F, mid USDA zone 8 and root hardy to at least –20F, USDA zone 5. Also does well in containers, indoors and out.
Adiantaceae 4D @ $9

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Agapanthus 'Midnight Blue' lily of the nile
Gorgeous globes of deep blue-violet flowers on 2.5 ft stalks appear in July and August above 18-24” clumps of dark green, strap-like leaves, narrower than other forms. This Irish selection of a South African native loves sun to part shade, plenty of fertilizer in summer, and well-drained soil. Needs water during the growing season but resents too much water at any time. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.
Amaryllidaceae 1g @ $15

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Agapanthus 'Tinkerbell' dwarf variegated lily of the nile
The variegated companion to Agapanthus ‘Peter Pan’ has dwarf foliage -- green with white edges -- and a dwarf flowering stalk of medium blue flowers rising to 18" above the 8" leaves. Useful as a container plant especially for its sprightly, variegated look. Enjoys sun to part shade in well-drained soil and average summer water. Evergreen to the mid 20s F, and cold hardy to at least USDA zone 8 and probably colder.
Amaryllidaceae 6in @ $11

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Agapanthus 'Winter Dwarf' dwarf lily of the nile
New selections from the old seedling strain of A. ‘Peter Pan’ and even smaller with strap-like leaves to only 6" or so and lavender-blue flowers on foot long stalks. Both dainty and indestructible in the garden. Does best in sun to part shade with regular water in spring and summer. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7 with mulch for extra protection.
Amaryllidaceae 6in @ $11

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Agapanthus inapertus ssp. pendulus 'Graskop' grassland agapanthus
Dark blue, nearly black buds that open to dark, violet-purple flowers mark this striking, deciduous agapanthus. Flowering in July and August, the 3 ft stems rise a foot above the clumps of light green, strap-like leaves. A bit more cold hardy than evergreen relatives, this cultivar from the northeast Transvaal in South Africa enjoys sun, well-drained soil, and spring and summer water. Also tolerates winter rains. Frost hardy to 15 to 20F, mid to upper USDA zone 8.
Amaryllidaceae 6in @ $18

Alstroemeria 'Glory of the Andes'

Alstroemeria 'Glory of the Andes'peruvian lily
An unusual Peruvian lily in that the flowers, a lovely gold with maroon markings, are also slightly sweet and the leaves are variegated, green edged in creamy yellow. Blooming from June through August, plants form clumps to 3 ft tall x 30" wide. Best in rich soil in full sun to part shade with regular summer water. This cultivar is well-behaved in the garden and doesn't spread. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.
Alstroemeriaceae 6in @ $9

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Alstroemeria psittacina 'Variegata' white edged princess lily
A plant with many common names including Peruvian parrot lily, for it's red flowers tipped in green and white, and lily-of-the-Incas, referring to its origins in South America. This Japanese selection has variegated foliage, grayish green with irregular white edges, on stems to 12-18" tall that form slowly widening clumps (eventually enough to share...). Stems emerge in early autumn, flowering in spring and enjoying a period of dormancy in summer. Best in sun to part shade with regular summer water. Frost hardy to at least the bottom of USDA zone 7 with mulch.
Alstroemeriaceae 4in @ $7, 6in @ $11

Amorphophallus konjac

Amorphophallus konjacvoodoo lily
This arum from southeast Asia is widely cultivated for its edible tuber but we grow it for the huge tropical looking leaves and "snakeskin" stem. In spring, long before the leaves appear, a huge and astonishing flower dazzles with a 2 ft, purple spadix standing above the purple-black spathe. (The "perfume", designed to attract flys for pollination, can be mitigated by simply rinsing the flower.) Plant stems and leaves develop after a well-deserved rest and can reach 6 ft tall in part sun to shade with regular summer water. Cold hardy to USDA zone 6.
Araceae 6in @ $9

Arachniodes standishii

Arachniodes standishiiupside-down fern
Much sought-after and hard to find fern, from Japan and Korea, with handsome evergreen to semi-evergreen fronds from 1-3 ft, almost frilly in appearance, and forming clumps that reach 2-3 ft wide after many years, spreading by underground rhizomes. For light to deep shade with average summer water. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.
Dryopteridaceae 4D @ $14

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Araucaria araucana monkey puzzle tree
A heritage tree, given away as seedlings by the Chilean exhibition at Portland, Oregon’s 1905 World’s Fair and planted throughout the city. A coniferous evergeen growing slowly to a stately 30 ft tall x 15-20 ft wide or so in cultivation the crown rounding in maturity. Leaves are tough, dark-green, sharp-pointed, and triangular. Specimens should be carefully placed not to compete with other trees and to avoid nearby pathways as the 15 lb cones can maim! Full sun to partial shade in moist, well-drained soil with regular summer water. Cold hardy to USDA zone 7.
Araucaria 4D @ $18

Arisaema taiwanense

Arisaema taiwanensetaiwan cobra lily
Extremely rare in commerce but we have a good supply from seeds collected by intrepid friends. The lizard-mottled stems bursts out of the woodland ground in April followed by dazzling, cobra-lily black flowers and mind-boggling, deeply cut, acid-flashback leaves. For shade to dappled shade in rich soil with average of summer water. Frost hardy in the ground in upper USDA zone 6, possibly lower.
Araceae 4D @ $18

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Arum palaestinum black calla lily
One of many amazing arums from the mountains of the Middle East and one that clumps for us instead of eating the garden. Winter growing with shiny, bright, 8-12” leaves and velvety, late winter flowers opening black and aging to rich, dark maroon. Seems tolerant of summer moisture or complete summer drought. Good for shade in the dry border. Remained intact in our garden after the December 2008 cold spell to 20F. We reckon root hardiness to at least mid USDA zone 7.
Araceae 6in @ $9

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Asplenium scolopendrium hart's tongue fern
Evergreen fern with bright green, leathery, tongue-shaped fronds forming erect clumps up to 1-1.5 ft tall and wide. This European native for part to full shade is best grown in rich, very well-drained soil with average summer moisture. Thrives in alkaline, limestone soils as well. Frost hardy to -20F, USDA zone 5.
Aspleniaceae 6in @ $12

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Athrotaxis cupressoides tasmanian cedar pencil pine
The Tasmanian pencil plant, also known as the pencil pine, is a unique and rare evergreen, a slow grower, reaching 10 ft in many years. The upright branchlets, eventually weeping, are covered with bright green scales -- think miniature araucaria (monkey puzzle tree). Pencil plants enjoy damp conditions in medium to bright light and cool soil that is mulched or planted with ground covers. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 8.
Taxiodaceae 1g @ $24

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Athrotaxis laxifolia tasmanian pencil plant
One of the Tasmanian pencil plants growing in cool peaty soils high on the Central Plateau. This suspected cross between A. cupressoides and A. selaginoides is a slow grower reaching 10 ft in many years, the branchlets upright, eventually weeping, and covered with bright green scales almost giving it the appearance of a miniature Araucaria (monkey puzzle). Damp conditions and medium to bright light. Maintain cool soil with mulch or ground covers. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8. Probably a no-go in the US southeast.
Taxiodaceae 2g @ $28

Austrocedrus chilensis [Cañon Infernillo, Chile]

Austrocedrus chilensis [Cañon Infernillo, Chile]chilean incense cedar
Lovely, drought adapted tree with somewhat weeping branches of light green cast in blue and a narrow, upright form, to 50 ft tall x 15 ft wide, keeps its columnar shape until quite old when the crown may broaden at the top. Bark is orange to darker brown and peels in narrow strips. This high elevation collection from about 4500 ft indicates cold hardiness of close to 0F, USDA zone 7, if provided bright light and good drainage. Reminiscent of our own native incense cedar, Calocedrus decurrens.
Garryaceae 2g @ $32

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Austrocedrus chilensis RCH 476 chilean cedar
This Randall Hitchin collection has turned out to be a doozy, truly extraordinary. From one single seed collection, we have selected not only a variegated plant but also one with very deep blue foliage. These seedlings, though variable, have all turned out to be a much prettier blue than the typical plants in commerce. A lovely western Andean plant, growing in conditions seemingly analogous to the dry rocky slopes of our western cedar, Calocedrus decurrens. Tested plants seem to have a cold limit of just below 0F, upper USDA zone 6. Though adapted to dry summer places, a little extra water speeds them to 18” to 2 ft of growth a year to an eventual 30 ft tall. The symmetrical sprays of branches make a perfect companion for your monkey puzzle (Araucaria araucana) with which they often grow.
Cupressaceae 2g @ $24

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Billbergia nutans 'Blondie' friendship plant
A variation on a variation with entirely creamy yellow leaves on a perennial to 18" by 3 ft. This "friendship" plant, in our gardens since Victorian times, is a good part shade to shade perennial in upper USDA zone 8 and makes an ideal container plant where temperatures regularly drop below 15F, mid zone 8. Keep moist...and prosper. Named by Luen Miller.
Bromeliaceae 6in @ $16

Brahea armata

Brahea armatamexican blue hesper palm
The leaves are chalky, dusty blue on this most stunning Mexican palm, slow growing, to 20 ft in a long time. Sun to part shade and lean soil that promotes very, very good drainage for best winter hardiness. Drought tolerant but faster growing with some summer moisture. Roots should be disturbed as little as possible when planting. Easy in USDA zone 9; frost hardy with protection in zone 8 or in pots.
Arecaceae 2g @ $28

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Brahea decumbens
Fabulous clumping palm from medium and high elevations of northeastern Mexico, these 5 year old seedlings, from Tamaulipas amid oaks and Nolinas, grow to 5 or so ft tall and across with leaves ranging from blue-green to powder-blue -- blue-osity increasing with age. And speaking of age, we will be quite old by the time we see adult specimens as they are slow growing. At home with good drainage and medium to full sun. Heat hastens growth. Frost hardy into the upper teens without damage, upper USDA zone 8, probably as low as 10F in a protected spot.
Arecaceae 1g @ $26

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Bulbine frutescens shrubby bulbine
South African native with grassy, succulent leaves to 6" tall, spreading by underground rhizomes to form clumps to several feet across, topped in autumn to spring with 12-18" spikes of unusual yellow flowers. Fine in morning sun or dappled shade where summer sun is hot. Needs good drainage and tolerates summer drought but grows more quickly with occasional summer water. Prefers dry winters if possible. Frost hardy to 10f, USDA zone 8.
Liliaceae 1g @ $14

Butia capitata

Butia capitatajelly palm
From the highlands of southeastern Brazil, this stout, feather palm, slow growing to 10-15 ft, has long arching blue-grey fronds and a handsome thatched trunk. Site where heat can accumulate, such as near walls or concrete, in full sun and, preferably, well-drained soil. Drought tolerant but faster growing and more attractive with summer. These seed trees have been undamaged with overhead protection at 12F, the lower end of USDA zone 8.
Arecaceae 1g @ $24, 5g @ $55, 15g @ $325

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Canna 'Futurity Red'
Shared with us by Virginia Israelite, this old hybrid– the canna, not Virginia– reaches only 2-3 ft with orange-red leaves and true red flowers. As with all cannas, best with sun, fertilizer, and plentiful summer water. Good drainage is essential as well, providing protection from winter rains. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8, with mulch and that good drainage.
Cannaceae 1g @ $12

Canna 'Intrigue'

Canna 'Intrigue'
Peach apricot flowers and dusty purple narrow leaves on this vigorous 6-8 ft plant. Full to half sun with summer water and good drainage for winter protection. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8. It will change your life.
Cannaceae 1g @ $14

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Canna 'Musifolia'
This bold canna grows to 12-14 ft tall in clumps to 3-4 ft wide in a season with huge leaves with bronze-red margins, to 3 ft long and nearly 1/2 as wide, on thick reddish stems. Very banana like and perfect for a lush, tropical garden. Red, midsummer flowers only add more pizzazz. Sun to part shade with plentiful summer water and well-drained soil to avoid problems with winter wet. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Cannaceae 2g @ $26

Canna warszewiczii

Canna warszewiczii
A wonderful species canna with dark burgundy stems, deep green leaves and cherry-red flowers from late spring through frost. As with most species canna, the flowers are smaller, more elegant, and they fall freely from the spike, maintaining a tidy look without much effort on your part. Grows to 6 feet high. Full to part sun, rich soil and summer water for the best growth. Hardy to 10F or so, give it good drainage and mulch in winter for extra protection. A great addition to the hardy tropical garden.
Cannaceae 1g @ $17

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Cephalotaxus harringtonia 'Fastigata' japanese plum yew
Intensely vertical "cow’s tail pine" from Japan, slow growing, eventually reaching 10 ft tall x 6 ft wide over a long time. Evergreen and a rich dark green, the new growth appears as paler green creating a nice contrast. Best in morning sun with afternoon shade, with regular summer water. Makes an excellent ,very hardy accent or exclamation point for the garden. Cold hardy to USDA zone 6.
Cephalotaxaceae 1g @ $14

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Chamaecyparis lawsoniana 'Van Pelt's Blue' lawson's false cypress
This selection of our Pacific Northwest native false cypress shines all year with its sprays of intense blue foliage. Considered one of the best of the Lawson cypresses, this is a moderate grower, reaching 10-12 feet high x 3-4 feet wide in 10 years. Prefers full sun, well-drained soil, and little summer water once established. Frost hardy to at least -15F, mid USDA zone 5.
Cupressaceae 2g @ $1

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Chamaecyparis pisifera 'Filifera Aurea' golden japanese false cypress
Bright, evergreen shrub with golden, weeping, thread-like foliage that stands out in any garden spot. This is a dense, semi-dwarf shrub, to only 6-7 ft tall in more than 10 years, with peeling, red bark that contrasts with the yellow foliage. Best in a bit of shade where soil is rich and moist but well-drained. Tolerates drought as well but grows more quickly with some summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 4.
Cupressaceae 1g @ $14

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Chamaecyparis pisifera 'Tsukumo' tsukumo false cypress
Lovely evergreen shrub, small enough to fit into any yard, with fine-textured foliage or green needles tinted blue on the undersides, forming a small bun to only 10" tall for a long, long time, eventually reaching 1 1/2 ft tall and wide. A perfect punctuation mark. Tolerates drought once established but prefers rich, moist soil that drains well. Frost hardy in USDA zone 4.
Cupressaceae 1g @ $17

Chamaecyparis thyoides 'Glauca Pendula'

Chamaecyparis thyoides 'Glauca Pendula'atlantic white cedar
Evergreen shrub to small tree from the southeastern United States, fast-growing to 8 ft tall, eventually to 15 ft or so, with spreading, pendulous branches and green-blue foliage etched white. Yum! Great accent for full sun and fertile, well-drained soil where it can receive summer water. Frost hardy to USDA zone 5 and possibly colder with good drainage and ample water.
Cupressaceae 1g @ $18, 2g @ $32

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Chamaedorea radicalis mexican parlor palm
This little sweetheart thrives for us in the Portland area, weathering winters well and happy as a clam in half shade with consistent moisture. Single stems, but spreads by suckers. From our own collections in NE Mexico. Tops out at waist height. Mulch well.
Arecaceae 5g @ $47

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Chamaerops humilis MEDITERRANEAN FAN PALM
This palm is a fixture of old Portland gardens with stiff armed foliage and multi-trunked exuberance. Eventually to 5-10 ft tall by 5 ft wide. Site in full to part sun. Cold hardy in upper USDA zone 8 but be prepared to throw a blanket over it at ±15F.
Arecaceae 6D @ $22, 5g @ $47, 15g @ $175

Chamaerops humilis var. cerifera - blue form

Chamaerops humilis var. cerifera - blue formMediterranean Fan Palm
Chalky blue-leaved form of the Mediterranean fan palm from above the tree line in the Atlas Mountains of Morocco. Multitrunked to 6 ft, becoming a palm mound with age. Best with great heat (near concrete, afternoon sun). Said to be the hardiest form of the species. Seed collected in the wild by Martin Gibbons. Evergreen to 15F and able to resprout in USDA zone 8.
Arecaceae 2g @ $28, 5g @ $47, 15g @ $175

Crinum bulbispermum

Crinum bulbispermumsouth african river lily
Striking South African lily with a large long-necked bulb. Arching, strap-like, blue-green leaves form clumps to 3 ft tall & wide, topped in mid-spring with large, funnel-shaped, fragrant flowers in white or shades of pink with a red streak on each petal. Best in sun or part shade in hot climates with plentiful water during during the growing season. Tolerates soggy soil but appreciates a dryer environment in dormancy. Dislikes being transplanted and takes time to establish so patience is required as well. Frost hardy in USDA zones 7-10.
Amaryllidaceae 1g @ $14

Cryptomeria japonica 'Dacrydioides'

Cryptomeria japonica 'Dacrydioides'Whip-cord japanese cedar
Stunning shrub to small tree, to as much as 10-20 ft tall eventually, with long, pendulous branches and gray-green, aromatic foliage that adds brown overtones in winter. Needle-like leaves overlap, creating a rope-like, or whipcord texture. Best in full sun with adequate summer water in soil that drains well. Frost hardy to at least USDA zone 6.
Cupressaceae 2g @ $28, 5g @ $55

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Cunninghamia lanceolata 'Glauca' chinese blue fir
From a fine old specimen in the Medford, OR garden of Boyd Kline, this tropical looking redwood relative, to a pyramidal 30 ft or more in time, has coppery orange bark and luxurious powder blue branchlets that have a once-a-year partial shedding in mid fall. Able to withstand some drought once established. Frost hardy into the upper end of USDA zone 6.
Taxodiaceae 10g @ $145

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Cunninghamia lanceolata 'Greer’s Dwarf'
Dwarf China fir that seems only to get about 6 ft tall, growing only 4-6" per year with the distinctive needles of the species, tightly held and only 4-6" long. The striking blue-green foliage turns a bronzy color in winter creating interest throughout the year. Happy in full sun or part shade with average summer water. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7. Our plants received from their namesake, Harold Greer of Greer Gardens.
Taxodiaceae 5g @ $47

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Cupressus arizonica 'Taylors Silver' smooth arizona cypress
A very tough, drought tolerant cypress, usually of rugged, picturesque character, that is well adapted to the moderate and warmer regions of the west away from the coastal fog belt. This form, newly introduced from Europe, grows to 25 ft tall and is distinguished by its blue-ness and somewhat columnar habit. Sun to a little shade, with average drainage and little or no summer watering when established. Frost hardy in upper USDA zone 5.
Cupressaceae 5g @ $47

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Cupressus arizonica var. glabra 'Blue Ice' Blue Ice Arizona Cypress
Wonderfully soft blue cypress for dry conditions that reaches up to 15 ft tall x 6-8 ft wide in bright sun with good air circulation and well-drained soil. Drought tolerant once established, forming deeper and more stable root structures in dryer conditions. Makes a striking accent or hedge. Beautiful and very frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Cupressaceae 1g @ $14, 2g @ $28

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Cupressus arizonica var. montana 'San Pedro Centennial'
A Cistus introduction, this stately cypress from the Sierra San Pedro Martyr reaches 30-40 ft eventually remaining narrow with up-turned branches clothed in vibrant silver-blue, scaley needles. Deep orange bark adds to the fun. Quite drought tolerant in bright situations and lean soil. Frost hardy to upper USDA zone 6.
Cupressaceae 2g @ $32

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Cupressus bakeri modoc or baker cypress
Native to northern California and southern Oregon, this slow growing cypress -- to 50 ft in several generations -- does well in tough, sunny situations as long as the soil is well-drained and it gets water until established. Foliage is Gray-blue, somewhat pendulous foliage, aromatic twigs, and red bark, are just a few of the pluses. Cold hardy to USDA zone 5.
Cupressaceae 5g @ $52

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Cupressus chengiana var. kansouensis UCSC 91-899
Rare, found only in China and endangered there, this is a tall, graceful conifer, to 30 ft plus in the garden with branches that are densely arranged and spreading. Foliage is green against reddish bark that peels in strips with age. Does well in sun and well drained soil. Little summer water once established. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7. Also known as C. chengiana var. chengiana.
Cupressaceae 5g @ $52

Cupressus macrocarpa 'Citriodora'

Cupressus macrocarpa 'Citriodora'Golden Monterey Cypress
This Monterey Cypress selection from the United Kingdom has luscious, dense foliage, both lemon-colored and deliciously lemon-scented. Somewhat smaller than other forms, this one can reach 20 ft tall eventually, but is easily kept smaller and maintained as a large shrub by pruning or perhaps through hedging. Best in full sun in well-drained soil, these need little summer water once established. Frost hardy to 10F, USDA zone 8.
Cupressaceae 2g @ $24

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Cupressus macrocarpa 'Wilma Goldcrest' Monterey Cypress
Small, evergreen conifer with glowing, lemon-yellow and lemon scented foliage. Upright, narrow, and columnar, this is a slow grower, to 6 ft in 10 years and eventually to 15 ft, a perfect accent for the small garden. Sun with good drainage and very little summer water for best performance. Frost hardy at least into the low to mid teens, low to mid USDA zone 8 and, reported, into zone 7. A good pot specimen as well.
Cupressaceae 4in @ $11

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Cupressus sempervirens 'Glauca' Italian Cypress
A lovely blue form of the classic Italian cypress. This landscape plant for Mediterranean climates grows to 10 ft tall x 18” wide in as many years, an excellent upthrusting element in your urban landscape. Full sun, well-drained soil and not much supplemental water once established. Also good in pots. Cold hardy to the single digits, mid USDA zone 7.
Cupressaceae 5g @ $47, 15g @ $195

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Cupressus sempervirens 'Skinny Princess'
A Cistus introduction with a name that sounds good but has no particular meaning -- except that plants are skinny. This selection, chosen from a random planting of seedlings, produces, in ten years, plants 12-15 ft tall but no more than 12” in width. Skinny, indeed, with dense, dark green foliage and absolutely no inferiority complex. Seriously, we have repeated this in the garden to great effect, and recommend it over the very poor and disease-prone cultivar C. 'Tiny Tower.' Full sun for best effect with little to no summer water once established. Frost hardy in mid USDA zone 7.
Cupressaceae 4in @ $11, 6in @ $16

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Cupressus sempervirens 'Swaine's Golden'
Fabulous form of the Italian cypress, to 15 ft or more, with bright yellow-dusted-blue-green foliage. Like its cohorts, very drought tolerant. We us it in our garden as an accent surrounded by lots of blue and dark green foliage. it's been around for awhile, but unfortunately seldom offered and, for us, a bit slow and difficult to root. Full sun. Careful drainage. Can easily be shorn or tied should it become shaggy looking. USDA zone 8; quite possibly zone 7 with a protected south wall.
Cupressaceae 2g @ $28

Cyathea cooperi

Cyathea cooperilacy tree fern
This Australian tree fern is well known in cultivation, growing quickly at nearly 1 ft per year to 12 ft tall in good conditions, part sun to dappled shade with regular water and fertilizer. The trunk is slender, to only 3-6" thick while the lacy fronds can reach 8 ft long. Less hardy than C. brownii and C. australis, where temperatures go below the upper 20s F, these can be grown in a pot and, for best results, brought indoors at freezing temperatures. Planted in the garden, they can be lifted or wrapped if cold temperatures threaten.
Cyatheaceae 7g @ $65

Cycas revoluta

Cycas revolutasago palm
Handsome evergreen, not a true palm at all, but rather, a primitve survivor related to cone bearing conifers. With stiff, feather-like leaves up to 10 ft tall eventually, these plants make a striking, tropical accent in the garden. For a sunny, well-drained spot with regular summer water. Best to cover or wrap when temperatures drop into the teens F, mid USDA zone 8. Makes an excellent houseplant as well.
Cycadaceae 5g @ $67, 15g @ $1400

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Cyclamen coum - silver form
A delightful form of Cyclamen coum, the round green leaves more splashed with silver than the straight species. A wonderful plant for dry shade where soil is well-drained, providing colorful foliage all winter and pink to white flower from fall to spring. Spreads by dividing the underground tubers to form lovely colonies under shrubs and anywhere color is wanted. To 5-10" tall forming small colonies. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.
Primulaceae 2in @ $5

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Cyrtomium falcatum 'Rochfordianum' Japanese holly fern
Leaves are dark green and glossy on this cultivar, to 2 ft tall forming 2-3 ft, vase-shaped clumps of nearly erect, evergreen fronds. Handsome in part to full shade planted in rich, well-drained soil that is watered regularly in summer. Mulch to maintain consistent moisture. Frost hardy to -10F, USDA zone 6. A fine and frost hardy container specimen.
Dryopteridaceae 1g @ $15

Dahlia 'Fascination'

Dahlia 'Fascination'
Dark black purple foliage with iridescent lavender flowers. Seems to be hardy in well-drained ground when tubers are 6" or so deep. Foliage reaches 2 ft tall and flowers stand above to 4 ft. Sun and summer water. Nice in front of your new cobalt wall. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 with good winter drainage.
Asteraceae 4D @ $9

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Dicksonia antarctica TASMANIAN TREE FERN
This highly sought after fern matures with huge 6 ft+ fronds. Can achieve a considerable trunk with age. Best out of winds & under the high shade of evergreen trees. Sails through most years, but requires wrapping or lifting at 20F or so. Well worth it. Spore grown; NOT the wild collected trunks some sell.
Dicksoniaceae 1g @ $18

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Dryopteris erythrosora 'Brilliance' autumn fern
A small fern, great for the shady or woodland garden, with wonderfully colored foliage that begins with coppery new growth, greening in summer and re-coppering again in fall. Evergreen through most winters in the Pacific Northwest, recovering easily from any unusual temperatures. Plants are 24-36" tall by 15" wide and do well in part to full shade. Regular moisture is best. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.
Dryopteridaceae 1g @ $15

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Dryopteris uniformis 'Cristata' crested uniform wood fern
Useful and lovely evergreen fern for deep to moderate shade with slowly clumping rosettes of scalloped fronds with variable fans toward each tip. We use these even in dryish shade though they appreciate moisture when particularly hot. Fully evergreen into USDA zone 7. Responding to leaf damage in zone 7 and to the bottom of zone 6.
Dryopteridaceae 6in @ $12

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Eucomis 'Toffee' pineapple lily
Cultivar of a South African native, this one with light pink, “pineapple”-like flowers on contrasting mahogany stalks in August - September. Leaves are long, narrow and tropical looking. Plants emerge in spring and need water for proper growth. Best in bright light, full sun to part shade, where they can be protected from excess winter water, perhaps by an overhang. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7; lower with mulch. Can be grown in pots or lifted for the winter.
Liliaceae 1g @ $11

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Eucomis comosa 'Maroon Margin' Pineapple Lily
An exquisite plant with an unexciting name. This pineapple lily from the Drakensburg Mountains of South Africa forms a slowly colonizing clump of wide-leaved, deep green rosettes -- edged burgundy in this form. In late summer the flowers appear as dense clusters atop the long stem, supported and topped by small rosettes of leaves -- yes, looking very much like a pineapple. A native of moist swales, all Eucomis are tolerant of heavy soil. This species is deciduous at first frost, resprouting as soon as soil warms. Even moisture. Frost hardy to USDA zone 6 with many reports of success in 5. Mulch where soil freezes deeply.
Liliaceae 1g @ $12

Eucomis comosa 'Oakhurst'

Eucomis comosa 'Oakhurst'purple pineapple lily
Dark leaved pineapple lily that holds its reddish purple color late into the season. To 1-3 ft tall, the leaves forming tropical looking clumps, with late summer flowers, pink florets topped with a crown of bracts, atop an 18" flower stalk. Rich, well-drained soil, in any sunny location that does not collect too much water in the winter. Frost hardy into USDA zone 7, colder with mulch. This wonderful plant adds a dramatic punch to the mixed border or potted plant collection.
Asparagaceae 1g @ $12

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Eucomis comosa 'Tugela Ruby' pineapple lily
Upright, somewhat fleshy leaves to 18” tall, colored a deep, dark purple in this cultivar and, in mid summer, saturated pink, fragrant flowers, darkening over time. The flower stalks, looking indeed a bit like pineapples, make very good cut flowers. Full sun or part shade in hottest climates gives the best foliage color. Requires water in the spring and summer growing season and relief from winter moisture – very well-drained soil or overhead protection. This South African native is best left undisturbed for a long and fruitful life. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7; mulch for extra protection.
Liliaceae 6in @ $12

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Eucomis pallidiflora ssp. pole-evansii Giant Pineapple lily
From South Africa, a wonderful and hard-to-find perennial with rosettes of bright, pale-green leaves, to 3 ft tall and 4-5" wide, appearing in late spring and topped in late summer by creamy, green-center florets in a long cone with tufts of green leaves at the top. An impressive presence in sun to partial light shade. Tolerates poor drainage but prefers well-drained soil, especially in winter wet, and performs best with average summer water. Mulch and drainage improve winter cold hardiness to 0F, USDA zone 7. A fine container plant.
Asparagaceae 6in @ $12

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Eucomis vandermerwei dwarf spotted pineapple lily
A rare pineapple lily and one of the most graceful, this form has prolific rosettes, to 6" tall in clumps to 15" wide, of ruffled leaves tinted purple with darker polka dots and a pinkish flower spike of only 6-8" in height. Native to the Drakensberg Mtns in rocky crevices, they need very good drainage for winter survival. A lovely perennial bulb and easy with summer water anywhere the ground does not freeze deeply, e.g., mid to upper USDA zone 7. Otherwise a very nice container specimen.
Liliaceae 4in @ $7

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Haemanthus albiflos - dwarf form
Lovely amaryllis from South Africa's Drakensberg Mountains, this form given to us by California plantswoman Myrtle Wolf, each bulb sitting above ground with thickened, opposite leaves covered with a most endearing fur. The plants quickly offset, the larger bulbs producing white flowers consisting mostly of stamens, looking well….like floss or a shaving brush…. Bright light for best look and regular summer water. Has actually been garden hardy for us in USDA zone 8 in protected spots but we recommend small containers anywhere temperatures drop to 20F, bottom of USDA zone 9.
Amaryllidaceae 6in @ $14

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Haemanthus humilis ssp. hirsutus
Our collection years ago from the eastern Drakensburgs of South Africa growing in the grasses with many other scrumptious plants at about 9,000 ft. Opposite leaves covered with fine hairs emerge from a bulb that can reach 6" or more. White, rounded flowers appear in spring and summer. Bright light and at least some summer water is a must for happy plants. The bulbs alone are attractive enough that they are often lifted in pots to be grown almost as bonsai. Strangely, we have not planted any of ours outside, though their collection location suggests frost hardiness to at least upper USDA zone 8. Excellent pot specimen.
Amaryllidaceae 4D @ $9

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Hermodactylus tuberosus Snake's head iris
Wonderfully exotic, wonderfully fragrant, late winter flowering irid from the Mediterranean regions in unique colors of beige and purple blue. To 12-18" tall. Rhizomatous and forming colonies that love sun and gritty soil. Seemingly, the more extreme the climate, the better. Though this irid would hate hothouse conditions, it has grown and flowered profusely adjacent to a heat loving tuberose. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6.
Iridaceae 4in @ $9

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Hesperaloe funifera x parviflora
Stunning evergreen perennial originally from Mt. States Nursery’s hybridizing, this with more of the size and vigor of H. funifera, the leaves reaching 6 ft, and the lovely peach to coral flower tones and purpling leaves of H. parviflora. Flower stalks rise to 6 ft +, flowering all summer Ohh! Bright light brings out leaf color. Frost hardy into USDA zone 6. Easy to grow with good drainage.
Liliaceae 5g @ $57

Hesperaloe parviflora - yellow flowered

Hesperaloe parviflora - yellow flowered
A selection from Ron Gass at Mountain States Nursery in Glendale, Arizona, this form is typical of H. parviflora in its 3-4 ft rosettes and 5-6 ft flower stalks but with canary yellow flowers. A very pretty and unusual selection and most attractive when combined in single plantings with the coral-orange flowered forms. Full sun to part shade with little summer water. An easy grower, frost hardy in USDA zone 6.
Liliaceae 5g @ $47

Ipheion uniflorum 'Charlotte Bishop'

Ipheion uniflorum 'Charlotte Bishop'pink spring starflower
A somewhat new, pink form of this always popular flowering bulb, with lightly fragrant and particularly large, star-shaped, bright pink flowers in late winter to early spring. Clumps of, grassy, blue-green leaves rise to only 4-5", fitting anywhere in sun to part shade. Drought tolerant but appreciates some summer water. Particularly useful under the bright edges of shrubs where there is much root competition or anywhere spring pink is welcome. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.
Amaryllidaceae 4D @ $7

Ipheion uniflorum 'Froyle Mill'

Ipheion uniflorum 'Froyle Mill'starflower
This native of Uruguay was selected for its deep, uniform blue-purple color and its large flower size. A hardy bulb, its foliage appears with the flowers in early spring, then fades in summer heat, returning in September. Best in light shade in rich, light soil with regular summer water. Extremely easy to naturalize. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.
Amaryllidaceae 4in @ $5

Ipheion uniflorum 'Rolf Fiedler'

Ipheion uniflorum 'Rolf Fiedler'spring starflower
One of the prettiest of the numerous cultivars now available, ‘Rolf’ forms a moderately expanding clump of blue-green leaves rising to only 4-5“ with fragrant, deep purple-blue streaked flowers fading to violet from fall here to early spring. Likes sun to part shade and appreciates summer water though doesn't depend on it. Particularly useful under the bright edges of shrubs where there is much root competition. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.
Amaryllidaceae 4in @ $8

Jubaea chilensis - seed: CA

Jubaea chilensis - seed: CAChilean wine palm
Amazingly large trunked palm native to both sides of the Central Valley of Chile. Historically harvested for sweet sap used to make an alcoholic beverage. Semi-hardy in the Northwest; the trick is to give it enough heat accumulation for it to grow! These from 100 year old Northern California trees that have gone through 8F, upper USDA zone 7.
Arecaceae 3g @ $37, 5g @ $85, 15g @ $285

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Jubaea chilensis - seed: Chile chilean wine palm
Amazingly large trunked palm native to both sides of the Central Valley of Chile. Historically harvested for sweet sap used to make an alcoholic beverage. Semi-hardy in the Northwest; the trick is to give it enough heat accumulation for it to grow!
Arecaceae 5g @ $85, 15g @ $285

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Jubaeopsis caffra Pondo palm
A most beautiful palm from S. Africa, slowly growing to 15-20 ft. Needs heat, good drainage, and unfortunately no freezing temperatures, so containers are the answer in the Pacific Northwest. Will eventually sucker to form a clump of plants. Frost hardy in USDA zone 9b.
Arecaceae 5g @ $55

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Juniperus scopulorum 'Moonglow' moonglow rocky mountain juniper
Very striking, small, evergreen conifer, to 20 ft tall in time, forming a broad pyramid of dense, silver-blue foliage. Can be used as a single specimen or to create a hedge wherever there is sun and soil with good drainage. Drought tolerant once established; can also tolerate occasional summer water if the drainage is excellent. Said to deer resistant as well. Frost hardy to -30F, USDA zone 4.
Cupressaceae 7g @ $57

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Lycoris chinensis - yellow golden surprise lily
And-suddenly-the-earth-smiles -- this translation of the Chinese name perfectly describes these summer-dormant, amaryllis relatives emerging from bare earth to produce their flowers prior to leafing out. Though one of a series introduced by Jim Wattick as L. aurea, it is probably not since aurea seems to be species in which to lump every occurrence that isn’t red. This, with pleasing creamy yellow florets, has been relatively vigorous, seemingly happy with winter or summer drought in lightly dappled shade to full sun. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.
Amaryllidaceae 4D @ $11

Manfreda 'Macho Mocha'

Manfreda 'Macho Mocha'
Possibly a hybrid between Manfreda jaliscana and Agave scabra, this nearly 2 ft plant, from the semi-desert canyons just over the mountains from Monterey, Mexico, boasts deep purple leaves with, indeed, coffee-colored polka dots over the entire plant. For sun, good drainage, and average summer water. Evergreen to 20F and root hardy into the low teens, USDA zone 8.
Amaryllidaceae 1g @ $12

Microbiota decussata

Microbiota decussata
Woody, evergreen groundcover with feathery foliage in flattened sprays -- dark green in summer, turning bronze with cold weather and remaining so until spring. Slow growing to 1 foot high x 6 feet or so wide in sun and well-drained soil. Easy with some summer water and hardy to zone 3.
Cupressaceae 1g @ $11, 2g @ $7

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Musa basjoo hardy fiber banana
One of the boldest plants we sell. After 3 years, 20 foot stems with 10 foot long leaves and drooping branches of huge yellow flowers followed by real (insipid) bananas. Full to part sun, serious irrigation and heavy fertilizer. Plant 6" deeper than soil in can. Cold hardy in USDA zone 7a. Wow.
Musaceae 5g @ $42

Narcissus bulbocodium var. conspicuus

Narcissus bulbocodium var. conspicuushoop petticoat daffodil
Diminutive and tough little daffodil, superbly adapted to dry areas and rock gardens. The 6-12" tufts of chive-like foliage appear in autumn in mild climates with bright yellow, 1" hoops appearing as early as February. In colder climates, foliage appears in February with flowers in early spring. This European native multiplies freely in well-drained soil in sun to a bit of shade. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.
Amaryllidaceae 4in @ $7

Narcissus sp. [China Doll Narcissus]

Narcissus sp. [China Doll Narcissus]
A lovely creature with a long history in horticulture; a plant introduced from its Asian origin hundreds of years ago via the silk road. Also a favorite from Sean’s childhood garden. Several fragrant, 1” flowers with a yellow-orange trumpet are produced in late November but certainly by January. For a sunny spot with good summer baking. Frost hardy to the bottom of USDA zone 8.
Amaryllidaceae 6in @ $11

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Nerine 'Blue Flash'
Amaryllis relative from South Africa, this very striking cultivar having leaves with an unusally blue cast and coral flowers with cental blue streak. This form seems to multiply quickly as well. As with others in the genus, these are summer dormant, the flowers emerging "nekked" September - November after which the leaves appear in December and January, remaining through spring. Adapted to dry or wet summers provided good drainage and sun. Should be planted with bulb necks slightly above the ground. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 but may lose leaves in the upper teens F. Add mulch for winter protection.
Amaryllidaceae 4D @ $12

Nerine 'Coral Cape'

Nerine 'Coral Cape'
Amaryllis relative from South Africa, this one with flowers of deep coral, as the name would suggest. Another striking variety. As with others in the genus, these are summer dormant, the flowers emerging "nekked" September - November after which the leaves appear in December and January, remaining through spring. Adapted to dry or wet summers provided good drainage and sun. Should be planted with bulb necks slightly above the ground. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 but may lose leaves in the upper teens F. Add mulch for winter protection.
Amaryllidaceae 4D @ $12

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Oxalis 'Ruby Slippers' woodsorrel
One of the most colorful plants around, this primarily winter grower emerges with the deepest of burgundy purple leaves then adds intermittent coral-peach, 2 cm flowers from autumn or winter into mid spring. Can easily be kept going through summer in cool climates but happily summer dormant in pots. Excellent container plant, or very small scale groundcover, best in sun. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Oxalidaceae 4in @ $8

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Oxalis oregana 'Klamath Ruby'
A Cistus Introduction. A native of northern California and southern Oregon; these from a wild collection on the Klamath River. An excellent evergreen ground cover for shade with velvety, evergreen foliage, dark green above with dark red undersides, and large, pale, silk pink flowers. Try it in your deepest dark, dry shade, or in dappled sun with little summer water. Cold hardy in USDA zone 7.
Oxalidaceae 1g @ $12

Phlebodium pseudoaureum

Phlebodium pseudoaureumblue rabbit's foot fern
Once part of a more familiar genus and known as Polypodium areolatum, these ferns are handsome by any name with their evergreen, glaucous gray-blue, deeply lobed fronds to only 12" tall emerging from fuzzy red rhizomes that lie close to the surface. Wonderful in the garden in well-drained, consistently moist soil in part sun to dappled shade. Striking as cut foliage. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Polypodiaceae 1g @ $14

Pinus contorta var. contorta

Pinus contorta var. contortabolander's beach pine
Endemic to a narrow coastal area of California near Mendocino, these pines are often shrubby in their natural, windy habitats,but in less extreme, garden conditions, they can reach 15-20 ft tall and wide. A two-needle pine with short, narrow needles in this variety and knobby, open cones, these trees are endangered in their natural habitat. Preferring full sun and good drainage, they are adapted to summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 and best with protection from winter winds.
Pinaceae 4D @ $12

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Pinus edulis two needle pinyon
A bushy pine, native to the US southwest, eventually reaching up to 30 ft tall or so and nearly as wide in the garden, with many spreading branches covered in pairs of 1-2" needles green with whitish stomata on the surfaces, particularly the inner surfaces. Female cones are small, about 2" long, and produce edible nuts, tasty to wildlife and people. Loves sun and lean, well-drained soil. Drought tolerant once established but doesn't mind occasional summer water. A handsome addition to the garden, frost hardy in USDA zone 5.
Pinaceae 1g @ $16

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Pinus eldarica Afghan pin
This dark-needled pine, from Russia and Afghanistan, loves dry conditions, growing quickly when young, eventually reaching 30-80 ft tall by 15-25 ft wide with a symmetrical form, rounding on top over time. Needles are 6" long in sets of two and occasionally 3. Tolerates poor soils but good drainage is best for long term health. Drought tolerant once established, but accepts occasional deep watering, in full sun inland or on the coast where plants tolerate windy conditions. Frost hardy to -10, USDA zone 6.
Pinaceae 7g @ $57

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Pinus ponderosa - Willamette Valley Collection ponderosa pine
Beautiful, massive native tree, these from plants that grow in the Willamette Valley. Needles are up to 10" long. Bark is very dark brown when young, maturing to a yellow-red-brown, becoming very thick and furrowed, breaking up into "jigsaw puzzle" like pieces. Eventually reaches 175 ft but not quickly. Adapted to full sun, well-drained soil and little or no summer water once established. Frost hardy to -40F, USDA zone 3.
Pinaceae 1g @ $16

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Pinus sabiniana - OR State grayleaf pine, foothills pine
Often seen among other blue leaved plants from the serpentine soils of much of California and into southern Oregon. These cuttings from a champion tree at Oregon State University in Corvallis, a tree that measures 4/5 ft in diameter and 106 ft tall! Upright, and graceful (some old grumps say straggly) with a crooked trunk, often forked; dark gray, furrowed bark; and 10", silver-blue needles thinly covering the open crown. Superb back lit in winter light. Sun, lean soil, and very little summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7, and into zone 6.
Pinaceae 2g @ $28

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Platycerium bifurcatum 'Netherlands' staghorn fern
A fern and an epiphyte with pale, gray-green, fertile fronds to up to 3 ft long. A vigorous grower in a moisture retentive medium such as sphagnum moss in a pot or an open basket. Best watered well and allowed to dry out before watering again though the 'Netherlands' form is more tolerant of more frequent watering. Bright light is best but out of direct sun. Can be grown outdoors, perhaps tied to a tree limb, in USDA zone 9. Otherwise, a pot or basket plant.,
Polypodiaceae 4D @ $9

Podocarpus alpinus 'County Park Fire'

Podocarpus alpinus 'County Park Fire'alpine plum yew
OoooH! We think we are becoming quite enamored with these little podocarps. Another down-under plant selected by famed County Park Nursery in the United Kingdom, this jewel-like little conifer, reaches only about 3 ft with densely held, shiny, rounded needles of deepest green/maroon in summer, taking on fiery purple-orange tints in winter, especially in new growth. A fabulous addition to container or garden. The P. alpinus group is one of the most hardy of the genus, this plant having been hardy to close to 0F in several gardens. Stunning when planted with other party goers such as Uncinia rubra and, maybe our favorite, Libertia peregrinans for a rusty contrast. Average soil conditions; bright light best; not appreciative of prolonged drought. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.
Podocarpaceae 1g @ $16

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Podocarpus alpinus 'Red Tip' alpine plum yew
A very hardy podocarp selection from New Zealand, a dwarf conifer with needle foliage that emerges burnished red in spring and matures to dark, blue-green. Grows slowly to only 1 ft tall, spreading to 3 ft wide with an arching habit. Inconspicuous flowers produce red berries. Lean soil and regular summer water in full to part sun. Cold hardy to USDA zone 7.
Podocarpaceae 1g @ $15

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Podocarpus nivalis 'Otari' mountain totara
Male variety of this handsome podocarp, growing slowly to 3-4 ft x 5-6 ft wide, with olive green, needled foliage that turns a very rich, bright bronze in winter, becoming green again in summer. Best with good drainage and even moisture in bright light for good winter color. Frost hardy at temperatures close to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Podocarpaceae 6in @ $14

Podocarpus salignus

Podocarpus salignuswillowleaf podocarp
One of a number of exquisite and rare conifers from southern Chile, this upright, forest dweller with weeping branches and gracefully hanging foliage looks for all the world like the bamboo you always wanted. Particularly beguiling as it grows in several places with the Chilean native Chusquea culeou, a combination we observed during our first collections in Chile some years ago. Nothofagus and luma are other associates in this moist cool maritime environment. Unlike some other rarities, it has become quite at home in cultivation, adding a graceful subtropical effect in our courtyard and having remained undamaged in temperatures in the low teens F in several gardens. A plant for reasonably moist soil and average fertility, bright light to dappled shade (weeps a bit more in dappled shade). Eventually to 25-30 ft, more reasonably to 15 ft in the garden. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8.
Podocarpaceae 2g @ $24

Polianthes tuberosa 'The Pearl'

Polianthes tuberosa 'The Pearl'
Wonderfully fragrant bulb from Mexico loving dappled shade to sun and all the heat you can give it. Thought by many to have been selected originally by the Mayans back before ... the 1960s, but definitely discovered in the 1870s by nurseryman John Hendserson. Clusters of deliciously fragrant, creamy white, double flowers appear in late summer to autumn on 2-3 ft stalks, opening from pink-blushed buds. Given hot sun and ample fertilizer and summer moisture, these are cold hardy in USDA zone 7. Otherwise great as pot plants -- a necessity once one has become addicted to the fragrance. Can be allowed to dry in winter.
Amaryllidaceae 6in @ $12

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Polypodium guttatum
One unique fern, with its horizontally stacked fronds and almost plastic texture. Like some kind of prehistoric rhizomatous cycad-like creature. This little lovely is from Mexico, though frost hardy to 15F, and perfect for a Portland garden. Staying under 18 inches tall and slowly creeping outward, best in light to full shade with summer irrigation for plumpness. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8b. Fernalicious good!
Polypodiaceae 6in @ $12

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Polypodium vulgare 'Bifido Multifidum' Common Polypody
Deciduous fern, to 12-18" tall, with leathery fronds, deeply cut and crested. Attractive and tolerant of dry shade! Easy to grow out of wind in well-drained soil and part shade to shade with little summer water once established. Frost hardy to at least 0F, USDA zone 7.
Polypodiaceae 1g @ $15

Polystichum setiferum 'Congestum Cristatum'

Polystichum setiferum 'Congestum Cristatum'
A lovely dwarf form of the soft shield fern. This fern is evergreen and stays under 1 ft tall and as wide. Very fluffy fronds are soft to the touch and contrast nicely with brown papery stems. For part sun to part shade. Some drought tolerance once established, though occasional summer water is best. Frost hardy to USDA zone 6.
Dryopteridaceae 6in @ $12

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Pseudotsuga menziesii 'Idaho Weeping'
This Doug Fir selection has a weeping habit and is significantly more slow growing that the species. Not prostrate, the weeping is the branches and branch tips. Magnificently graceful in appearance. Full sun. 30’ or more.
Pinaceae 5g @ $65

Pyrrosia hastata

Pyrrosia hastataFelt Fern
An evergreen fern, quite rare in cultivation as it spreads very slowly, but attractive with thick, three lobed leaves, up to 16" long x 6-8" wide, green above and stippled with coppery felt below, on black stems to 6-12” tall and slowly expanding into larger clumps. Found clinging to rocks and tree trunks in China, Japan, and Korea, these are best in part shade to shade in well-drained, even rocky soil with summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 and into zone 7 with winter protection. Also does well in pots and as an indoor plant.
Polypodiaceae 2g @ $28

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Pyrrosia lingua Tongue Fern
A very special addition to any woodland garden, these evergreen ferns (yes, ferns) spread slowly to form dramatic clumps of one foot tall, erect "tongues" with copper-brown felty backsides. Shade to part shade and even moisture. Hardy to 5F - mid USDA zone 7. A curiosity and a wonderful accent.
Polypodiaceae 1g @ $16

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Pyrrosia lingua 'Variegata'
A special, variegated form of a special addition to any woodland garden, these evergreen ferns spread slowly to form dramatic clumps of one foot tall, erect "tongues" with copper-brown felty backsides. Shade to part shade and even moisture. Frost hardy to 5F, mid USDA zone 7. A curiosity and a wonderful accent.
Polypodiaceae 1g @ $18

Pyrrosia sheareri

Pyrrosia shearerishearer's felt fern
A lovely and unusual evergreen fern, one that is not often available and hardly looks like a typical fern at all, the long, narrow leathery fronds -- pea green with silver hairs on the undersides when young -- maturing to dark green with rusty brown hairs on the undersides. To about 30" tall in clumps to 15-18" wide, growing best in rich, well-drained soil in morning sun to shade with summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.
Polypodiaceae 4D @ $15

Rhapidophyllum hystrix

Rhapidophyllum hystrixNeedle palm
Wonderful rare species growing amid the cypress swamps of northern Florida, Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia, and just nipping into South Carolina. This slow growing clumper -- eventually to 10 ft with multiple offsets -- has a trunk covered with blackish fur and numerous spines, and graceful, glossy green leaves on long petioles. An easy plant in the garden; happy in shade to full sun in coastal climates and appreciative of generous summer water. Slow growing where nights are cool. Possibly the hardiest palm with numerous reports of little to no damage at 0 to -10F, USDA zone 6, and some of survival as cold as -22F, upper USDA zone 4, with only a little protection. Avoid root disturbance when transplanting. Very slow from seed. Ours are 7 years old.
Arecaceae 2g @ , 15g @ $125

Rhodohypoxis baurii 'Pintado'

Rhodohypoxis baurii 'Pintado'rosy posy
Small plant, to only 5" tall, the grass-like leaves forming small clumps topped in late spring / early summer with the palest pink flowers tipped and centered in red. Said to be the most fragrant of the species. Best grown in full sun with summer moisture and soil that drains very well. These are winter deciduous and happiest if entirely protected from winter rains through movable pots or troughs. Late to emerge in spring, their spot should be well marked for safety. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Hypoxidaceae 4D @ $9

Rhodohypoxis baurii 'Venetia'

Rhodohypoxis baurii 'Venetia'rosy posy
From the Drakensberg Mountains of South Africa, a tiny, clumping perennial with grassy leaves, to only 3-4" tall. Grown mostly for its charming, star-shaped, rose-red flowers that sit on the top of each stem in late spring. Sun and well-drained soil is best with consistent moisture in summer and little moisture in winter. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 with good drainage.
Hypoxidaceae 4D @ $8

Rhodohypoxis baurii var. platypetala

Rhodohypoxis baurii var. platypetala
South African perennial, small in all its parts, the grassy foliage to only 2-3" tall, topped in summer with, in this form, white flowers, star-shaped and sometimes tinged with pink. These little gems spread by underground rhizomes and require exquisite drainage to survive where winters are wet. Grows happily in dry and rocky, well-drained places. Appears somewhat late in spring so be sure and mark the spot well. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8 with that good drainage.
Hypoxidaceae 4D @ $8

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Rhopalostylis sapida shaving brush palm
New Zealand native, from dense forests with lots of rain, this the furthest south growing palm and this collection from the southernmost area in which it grows. A lover of cool coastal conditions. To 15-20 ft or so and very s-l-o-w-l-y... Frost hardy briefly into the teens F. Sun along the coast, dappled shade inland and summer water in dry climates. The perfect plant for Brookings, Oregon.
Arecaceae 5g @ $47

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Sabal minor - OK collection dwarf palmetto
Hard to believe, but the seed for these plants was collected from its northernmost native stand in Oklahoma. [shiver] The trunk runs underground & only the leaves are visible. Large 3 ft fans of blue green fronds, very stiff. Full sun where it can accumulate heat, such as near concrete. Needs some summer water. Very hardy in USDA zone 7 and possibly as low as upper zone 5 with mulch.
Arecaceae 2g @ $28, 5g @ $47

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Sabal x - Birmingham group
Indeed found at the courthouse in Birmingham Alabama; seed shared with us by Hayes Jackson. This vigorous, blue-tinted palm looks to be a relatively stable hybrid between S. palmetto and S. minor. Though not as large growing as S. palmetto, it does form a trunk with large, blue-green leaves. Quick to establish in the Southeast; slow but worth it on the West Coast, unless, of course you live in the Yuma, where it would clip along quite quickly. It has produced 2 to 3 fronds per year in our Portland garden. 4 year old plants in 6” deep containers.Has recovered from below 0F, upper USDA zone 6; leaves appear undamaged at 10F, zone 8.
Arecaceae 6D @ $18

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Saxegothaea conspicua Prince Albert’s yew
From what’s left of the dense forests of Chile’s Patagonia, this bridge between the families Podocarpaceae and Araucariaceae is not only botanically interesting, it is a fantastic addition to the garden. Small tree, to 10 ft or so tall, with a loose habit (much like the boys who sport PA’s). Best in a somewhat moist situation with high shade or morning sun. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7b.
Podocarpaceae 1g @ $15

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Taxodium distichum 'Pendens' pendens baldcypress
Deciduous conifer, a long-lived tree that can reach 40-50 ft in half as many years. Enjoys moist soil, even wetlands, but is successful in moist, well-drained soil as well, even tolerating occasional drought. The branch tips droop slightly on this cultivar, creating a graceful profile and cones are larger than the species. Sun to dappled shade. This North American native is frost hardy to -20F, USDA zone 5
Cupressaceae 2g @ $37

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Taxodium distichum var. imbricatum pond cypress
We saw this cypress all over the lowland areas of South Carolina on our last visit, standing like somber sentinels.... These are deciduous conifers, growing to 30 ft or so in the garden, taller in the wild. Leaves are needle-like, spirally arranged close to the stems, deep green in summer and turning lovely orange-brown in fall. Native to coastal areas of the American south, these love water, every kind of water. Easily grown in full sun in moist and water retentive soil -- even in occasional standing water. Frost hardy to -20F, USDA zone 5.
Cupressaceae 15g @ $125

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Taxodium mucronatum - historic New Mexico population montezuma cypress
A tall, handsome, Mexican native tree, to 50 ft or more by 30-40 ft wide and semi-evergreen, with a spreading crown, horizontal branches, and weeping foliage. Prefers sun to part sun and lean soil with regular summer water, though tolerant of summer drought. The Montezuma cypress was once thought to grow only in warmer climes of USDA zone 9 or so, but these plants, cutting grown from seed collected off 500 year old trees at 5000 ft in New Mexico, are very happy in the Pacific Northwest USDA zone 8. Taxodium huegelii is a synonym accepted by some as the proper name.
Cupressaceae 2g @ $26

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Taxus baccata 'Fastigiata Aurea' golden irish yew
Upright, very evergreen conifer, very like its close relation but with golden leaves, giving a brighter appearance over all. A great vertical accent in the garden. Slow growing -- say 15 ft in your lifetime -- with crowded upright branches forming a dense, narrow column. Accepts hard pruning. Drought tolerant but best in sun to part shade with regular summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6.
Taxaceae 1g @ $14, 3g @ $42, 5g @ $57

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Trachycarpus fortunei Chinese Windmill palm
Hardiest and best palm for Portland. Medium growing to 20 ft or more. Best in full sun with ample moisture. Site out of wind to prevent tattering of leaves. Frost hardy to anything Portland can give it, easy in USDA zone 8; zone 7 and upper 6 with protection.
Arecaceae 15g @ $225, box @ $595

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Trachycarpus fortunei - precocious fruiting form Chusan Palm
Shared with us by great Texas plantsman, Scott Ogden, this little fella forms a short trunk that, though eventually growing to typical chusan palm size, forms a dense crown and flowers after only a few years from seed, producing heavy amounts of blue black fruit on yellow stems -- of great ornamental value. Full sun to only lightly dappled shade. Summer water for best growth. At least as typically frost hardy, to 0F with some reports of -10F. Five year old plants in 6" long pots.
Arecaceae 5g @ $57

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Trachycarpus fortunei - Raleigh strain
Seedlings from plants in Raleigh, NC that have been through -9F, USDA zone 6. Probably the hardiest Trachycarpus form available and the hardiest and easiest palm for Portland. To 15 ft or so in time with sun and regular summer water. A must have.
Arecaceae 7g @ $85

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Trachycarpus latisectus windamere palm
This hardy variation on windmill palm has much larger leaves, many more segments to each leaf and leaf tips that usually droop. Reaches 20 ft tall over time. More showy than T. fortunei. Site our of wind in sun to part shade with regular summer water. Fronds are hardy into the low 20s F, USDA zone 9, with plants recovering in the low to mid teens, mid zone 8.
Arecaceae 7g @ $95, 15g @ $175

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Trachycarpus martianus - Khasia Hills Form Himalayan windmill palm
This most graceful Himalayan windmill palm, to 30 ft in time, is easily recognized by its narrow petioles and wide fans lined in short fur. The trunk often sheds its wool in age; unusual for a Trachycarpus. The entire tree has a decidedly more tropical effect than others of its genus and … well... for good reason.…It is. Unlike the below 0F frost hardiness hardiness of T. fortunei, 15 to 20F, mid USDA zone 8, seems to be the lower limit of this lovely plant. Enjoys sun and summer water. Plant where protected or use as a container plant.
Arecaceae 1g @ $22

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Trachycarpus takil kumaon fan palm
A vigorous chusan palm with exceptionally large fronds, standing upwards of 4-5 ft and bending in a uniform manner giving the tree a robust and almost weeping effect. Quick growth, sometimes more than 18" of trunk per year in happy times. Best in sun, though quite elegant in dappled shade, in rich soil with summer water where dry. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7 though fans can tatter below 10F, regrowing in summer.
Arecaceae 15g @ $195

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Trachycarpus takil - cultivated strain
Vigorous form of the chusan palm with exceedingly large fronds, standing upwards of 4' to 5', and quick growth, sometimes more than 18" of trunk per year in happy times. The appearance of the entire plant is quite lush with the ends of these large fronds drooping downward. In theory the trunks can lose their fibrous leaf bases with age but we have not see this happen without mechanical intervention. These plants, from isolated strains long in cultivation on the West Coast. Sun, though quite elegant in dappled shade. Their reputation has them as hardier than typical Trachycarpus fortunei, Cold weather, below 10ºF can tatter the graceful fans, especially if accompanied by winds. But no matter, the plants themselves have survived brief periods as low as -6ºF and the fronds quickly regrow with summer warmth.
Arecaceae 25g @ $325

Trachycarpus wagnerianus

Trachycarpus wagnerianusjapanese temple palm
To us the most exquisite of the Trachycarpus clan, found nearly 200 years ago in a temple in southern Japan and known only from cultivation. The stiff, symmetric leaves, looking as if shorn carefully at the ends, are lightly edged in white indumentum and often have most attractive pale blue undersides. Because of the rigidity of the leaves, they never tatter in high winds. Their most unique feature and what makes them most easily recognized is the several years spent resembling a miniature palm, as from very early on their fronds become "adult" -- even when only 4" or 5" across. Can be kept dwarf for many years but in the ground, with adequate summer water, they grow even more quickly than typical chusan palms, actually doubling in size for several years. Our 10 year old plants are now approaching 12-15 ft in height. (A small tidbit: though an incorrect entry, a palm book years ago confused T. wagnerianus with T. takil when actually they have little in common.) Best in bright sun. About as frost hardy as T. fortunei but shows damage less easily, e.g. no tattering. Our seed is produced from our own isolated plants. Woohoo! These plants already at least 4 years old and producing adult fronds. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.
Arecaceae 6in @ $19, 2g @ $37

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Trillium kurabayashii - Oak Flats, Chetko River, OR
Collected from Oak Flats near Oregon's Chetko River, and selected for their particularly purple spotted leaves. These, from seed, grow to 18" tall and have handsome flowers in the red range. As with most West Coast native trilliums, These prefer dappled shade and dry summers. Easy in the right conditions. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7.
Melanthiaceae 4D @ $18

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Tsuga mertensiana mountain hemlock
Handsome, evergreen conifer, native along the Pacific Coast from southern Alaska to the mountains of central California. Can reach 20-30 ft tall x 10-15 ft wide in the garden. Enjoys cool temperatures and moist conditions; does well in part shade or in full sun if not allowed to dry out. Consistent summer water is best. Frost hardy in USDA zone 5.
Pinaceae 2g @ $27

Typhonium venosum

Typhonium venosummonarch of the east
Striking, tuberous Araceae, the spring flowers (spathe) mottled in fleshy pink to metallic maroon and followed by an attractive, single leaf on a 2-3 ft petiole. Stunning, especially in flower. Very tropical. Also aromatic, redolent of fly-attracting odors that can be mitigated by a spray of water or left to work their own kind of magic. Best in half sun with regular summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 6.
Araceae 1g @ $12

x Amarygia parkeri ‘Hathor’

x Amarygia parkeri ‘Hathor’
An outstanding autumn flowering bulb from the late Amaryllid breeder Les Hannibal. Perfect for the summer dry garden. Large bulbs often exceeding 6-8 inches are slow to offset, but produce 1 to several stems ringed with 5-6inch white trumpets in August and September before the winter leaves emerge. Frost hardy in USDA zone 8. Full Sun. Best in gritty well drained soil.
Amaryllidaceae 2g @ $28

Zantedeschia aethiopica 'Hercules'

Zantedeschia aethiopica 'Hercules'hercules calla lily
A truly large form of calla lily that we obtained from Western Hills Nursery in Occidental, CA, bigger in both leaves and flowers -- and, of course, better. Leaves are spotted with cream dots and 8-10”, white flowers appear in early spring on stalks up to 6 ft tall. Full sun to part shade with adequate summer water. Frost hardy in USDA zone 7. Bulbs can be mulched or lifted in colder climates.
Araceae 4D @ $12, 3g @ $38

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