Cistus Nursery

*RETAIL - Trachycarpus wagnerianus

*RETAIL - Trachycarpus wagnerianus

To us the most exquisite of the Trachycarpus clan, found nearly 200 years ago in a temple in southern Japan and known only from cultivation. The stiff, symmetric leaves, looking as if shorn carefully at the ends, are lightly edged in white indumentum and often have most attractive pale blue undersides. Because of the rigidity of the leaves, they never tatter in high winds. Their most unique feature and what makes them most easily recognized is the several years spent resembling a miniature palm, as from very early on their fronds become "adult" -- even when only 4" or 5" across. Can be kept dwarf for many years but in the ground, with adequate summer water, they grow even more quickly than typical chusan palms, actually doubling in size for several years. Our 10 year old plants are now approaching 12-15 ft in height. (A small tidbit: though an incorrect entry, a palm book years ago confused T. wagnerianus with T. takil when actually they have little in common.) Best in bright sun. About as frost hardy as T. fortunei but shows damage less easily, e.g. no tattering. Our seed is produced from our own isolated plants. Woohoo! These plants already at least 4 years old and producing adult fronds. Frost hardy to 0F, USDA zone 7.

*THESE SIZES ONLY AVAILABLE FOR SALE IN OUR RETAIL NURSERY

Size

Planting Recommendations

Under most conditions, planting directly into the garden is best. Keep in mind, that in our care, plants have been protected from intense sunlight and drying winds and would therefore require sheltered transition time in order to acclimate to such conditions in your garden.

All plants going into containers (rather than in the ground) should be potted immediately in well-drained potting mix and watered well to ensure the soil is fully moistened with no air pockets. Succulent plants abide by different rules (**see below).

Plants held for later planting are best stored in a cool greenhouse or a well-lit garage or basement, rather than in your house where conditions are likely too warm and dry.

Those plants needing time to acclimate can be set out in pots and provided some shade and shelter for the first week to allow for a successful transition.

**For cacti and other succulents, we recommend using a soil mix of less than 30% organic matter, preferably a 2-1 blend of cactus/succulent potting soil and pumice, perlite or lava rock. These plants are sensitive to prolonged heavy moisture, especially in cool/winter conditions. Keep this in mind when watering them for the first time. It is better to leave them dry in lower temperatures.

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